Where We Are Going Today: Bafarat Cafe

Updated 23 August 2019

Where We Are Going Today: Bafarat Cafe

The Bafarat Company was established in 1952 as an exporter of herbs, spices, and coffee. 

The business has been thriving since its formation. 

The Bafarat cafe is a place where the old meets the new, making this place ideal for every age group.

The cafe is one of Jeddah’s oldest and most popular spots for people to meet. 

Its products are completely worth the money and many of them are unique.

A personal favorite of mine has been their date cheesecake. 

As a huge fan of dates, this combination was a treat.

Cafes are usually known for their rare blends of coffee, but Bafarat prefers to keep it simple.

The simplicity works. Their cappuccino is a customer favorite and in my view it is one of the best cappuccinos in Jeddah.


What We Are Reading Today: GDP: A Brief but Affectionate History

Updated 14 August 2020

What We Are Reading Today: GDP: A Brief but Affectionate History

Author: Diane Coyle

Why did the size of the US  economy increase by 3 percent in one day in mid-2013—or Ghana’s balloon by 60 percent overnight in 2010? Why did the UK financial industry show its fastest expansion ever at the end of 2008—just as the world’s financial system went into meltdown? And why was Greece’s chief statistician charged with treason in 2013 for apparently doing nothing more than trying to accurately report the size of his country’s economy? The answers to all these questions lie in the way we define and measure national economies around the world: Gross Domestic Product. This entertaining and informative book tells the story of GDP, making sense of a statistic that appears constantly in the news, business, and politics, and that seems to rule our lives—but that hardly anyone actually understands.
Diane Coyle traces the history of this artificial, abstract, complex, but exceedingly important statistic from its 18th- and 19th-century precursors through its invention in the 1940s and its postwar golden age, and then through the Great Crash up to today.
The reader learns why this standard measure of the size of a country’s economy was invented.