Pakistani opposition urges government to send Kashmir envoys to lobby in key capitals

Kashmiri refugees in Azad Jammu and Kashmir take part in an anti-Indian protest rally in Muzaffarabad on Aug. 18, 2019. (AFP)
Updated 21 August 2019
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Pakistani opposition urges government to send Kashmir envoys to lobby in key capitals

  • Last government of Nawaz Sharif appointed 22 parliamentarians as special envoys on Kashmir in August 2016
  • Pakistan is already lobbying the US, European countries and multilateral bodies since India revoked Kashmir's special status on Aug 5

ISLAMABAD: Pakistan’s major opposition parties on Tuesday urged the government to dispatch “multiparty delegations of parliamentarians” to key world capitals as special envoys to highlight human rights abuses in the disputed Kashmir region where a security clampdown and communications blackout was imposed almost two weeks ago.
On August 5, India removed the decades-old autonomy the Muslim-majority territory of Jammu and Kashmir enjoyed under the Indian constitution. The move blocks the territory’s right to frame its own laws, opens the door for residents of all parts to buy property and compete for government jobs and college spots, and has raised fears that the region will be flooded with outsiders.
Indian Prime Minister Narendra Modi’s surprise move has also increased tensions with arch rival Pakistan which lays claim to Kashmir and has accused India of human rights violations in the territory at the heart of more than 70 years of hostility between the two countries, both of whom have nuclear weapons.
Islamabad has recently been lobbying the United States, European countries and international bodies like the United Nations against India’s unilateral decision to strip Kashmir of its special status. In the past, UN Secretary-General Antonio Guterres has called on the two countries to refrain from any steps that could affect Jammu and Kashmir’s special status.
In Aug 2016, the last government of Prime Minister Nawaz Sharif had appointed 22 special envoys who traveled to key capitals to lobby for Indian-held Kashmir after deadly protests broke out over the killing of a popular freedom fighter, Burhan Wani, in a gunfight with Indian security forces. 
“The government needs to dispatch special multiparty delegations to world capitals to tell the world about Indian human rights violations in Kashmir,” Taj Haider, senior leader of the opposition Pakistan Peoples Party, told Arab News.
Referring to a United Nations report this July that accused India of human rights violations in Kashmir and called for the formation of a commission of inquiry into the allegations, Haider too urged the government to push the UN on the inquiry body. 
“The US and European countries are very sensitive to human rights abuses, and we need to put the case of Kashmiris effectively at the UN and other international forums,” Haider said.
Last week, the 15-member United Nations Security Council met behind closed doors at the request of China and Pakistan to discuss the Kashmir situation, but did not issue a statement after the United States, France and Germany objected. Such statements are agreed by consensus.
Senator Raja Zafarul Haq of the opposition Pakistan Muslim League-Nawaz party said the government should not have celebrated the UNSC’s session on Kashmir as “this was convened on the request of China and prorogued without giving any direction to resolve the decades-old dispute.”
“We cannot plead the case of our Kashmiri brothers effectively on international forums until we forge domestic political unity,” he told Arab News, urging the government to utilize all resources to internationalize the Kashmir dispute with the support of opposition parties.
Pakistan’s UN Ambassador Maleeha Lodhi has described her country’s push for last Friday’s Security Council meeting as “the first and not the last step.” She said it was the first time in more than 50 years that the council had taken up the issue.
“The fact that this meeting took place is testimony to the fact that this is an internationally recognized dispute,” Lodhi had told reporters. “The people of Jammu and Kashmir may be locked up ... but their voices were heard today at the United Nations.”
The Security Council adopted several resolutions in 1948 and in the 1950s on the dispute between India and Pakistan over the region, including one which says a plebiscite should be held to determine the future of mostly Muslim Kashmir. Another resolution also calls upon both sides to “refrain from making any statements and from doing or causing to be done or permitting any acts which might aggravate the situation.”
UN peacekeepers have been deployed since 1949 to observe a cease-fire between India and Pakistan in Jammu and Kashmir.
US President Donald Trump spoke to Modi and Pakistan Prime Minister Imran Khan on Monday urging them to reduce tensions over Kashmir. “A tough situation, but good conversations!” Trump said in a Twitter post after the calls.


Makkah, Karachi chambers agree to jointly develop business sector

Updated 20 min 10 sec ago
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Makkah, Karachi chambers agree to jointly develop business sector

  • Saudi Arabia is one of the top exporters to Pakistan
  • Mutual events and joint investment can help enhance bilateral business ties, says MCCI chief

MAKKAH: Makkah Chamber of Commerce and Industry (MCCI) chief Hisham bin Mohammed Kaaki met with his Pakistani counterpart Junaid Ismail, president of the Karachi Chamber of Commerce and Industry (KCCI) on Sunday in a bid to explore ways of jointly developing the business sector of the two countries, the Saudi Press Agency reported.
The meeting, headed by the visiting Saudi official, aimed at strengthening bilateral ties and to mull over areas of shared interests for the business community in Saudi Arabia and Pakistan.
Ibrahim Bardisi, secretary-general of the MCCI, was also in the attendance.
Kaaki said that the visit to KCCI would help strengthen mutual cooperation, exchange of expertise, arrange bilateral visits and events, in addition to organizing forums and exhibitions to help develop private sector and result in strong ties between the entrepreneurs on both sides. 
He added that interaction between the Saudi and Pakistani business community can be enhanced through various mutual activities, exhibitions and joint investments.
He lauded the relations between the two countries noting that he highly valued his visit to KCCI, which was Pakistan’s largest business body.
Ismail highlighted that Pakistan had a well developed textile and military industry, in addition to offering prospects in technology sector, civil engineering and other scopes of mutual interest. Organizing exhibitions would help strengthen bilateral ties indeed, he said.
The non-oil Saudi exports to Pakistan in the last five years are estimated at SR17 billion ($4.42 billion), including food items and construction material estimated at SR191 million and SR965 million respectively.
The Kingdom is one of the top exporters to Pakistan, while the latter exports textile goods, cloth, processed cotton, rice, meat, fruits, vegetables, spices, leather products, electronic and chemicals to Saudi Arabia.