Australia’s Hazlewood celebrates Ashes return with 3 wickets

Hazlewood, the lone change to the Australia side that won the first Test by 251 runs at Edgbaston last week, took three wickets for 58 runs from 22 overs. (Reuters)
Updated 15 August 2019
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Australia’s Hazlewood celebrates Ashes return with 3 wickets

  • At the close Ashes-holders Australia, were 30-1 —  a deficit of 228 runs
  • England suffered an all-too familiar collapse as they slumped to 138-6

LONDON: Australia’s Josh Hazlewood marked his entry into this season’s Ashes with three wickets as England were dismissed for 258 after the second Test at Lord’s finally got under way on Thursday.

World Cup-winning England fast bowler Jofra Archer then marked his Test debut with an electrifying opening spell but the only wicket Australia lost before stumps was when David Warner was bowled by Stuart Broad.

At the close Ashes-holders Australia, were 30-1 —  a deficit of 228 runs.

Cameron Bancroft was five not out and Usman Khawaja 18 not out.

England suffered an all-too familiar collapse as they slumped to 138-6 before a seventh-wicket stand of 72 between Jonny Bairstow and Chris Woakes repaired some of the damage.

Only opener Rory Burns (53) and wicketkeeper Bairstow, last man out for 52, passed 50 in the innings.

Hazlewood, the lone change to the Australia side that won the first Test by 251 runs at Edgbaston last week, took three wickets for 58 runs from 22 overs.

New-ball partner Pat Cummins took 3-61 from 21 while off-spinner Nathan Lyon equalled Australia pace great Dennis Lillee’s tally of 355 Test wickets with a return of 3-68.

Australia captain Tim Paine decided to field first on winning the toss after Wednesday’s first-day washout.

Hazlewood backed him up when, with just the ninth ball of the day, his third, he had Jason Roy caught behind by wicketkeeper Paine after the batsman fended at a rising delivery outside off stump.

Hazlewood then had England captain Joe Root LBW for 14 to a ball that nipped back.

Burns, fresh from his maiden Test century at Edgbaston, was dropped on 16 when Khawaja failed to hold a routine gully chance off Peter Siddle.

But although the sunny conditions appeared good for batting, wickets tumbled early in the second session.

Joe Denly (30), shaken up by a couple of short balls from Cummins, was caught behind off Hazlewood.

But Paine then dropped a low left-handed chance off Siddle to give Burns, now on 47, another reprieve

Burns completed an admirable 119-ball fifty including seven fours but was out when Bancroft held a brilliant diving left-handed catch at short leg off Cummins.

And England were 138-6 when Ben Stokes (13) was LBW on the sweep to Lyon.

Woakes was out shortly after being hit on the head by a Cummins bouncer.

Bairstow completed a defiant 82-ball 50 that came after he had managed just 30 runs in his six previous Test innings before he holed out off Lyon.

Archer, replacing the injured James Anderson, England’s record wicket-taker, was given the new ball alongside Broad on the ground where he had bowled the Super Over that had secured a World Cup final win over New Zealand last month.

His second ball cut sharply back up the Lord’s slope and just missed Bancroft’s off-stump and he beat the bat repeatedly in a thrilling six-over spell.

Thursday saw Lord’s turn red in support of the Ruth Strauss Foundation — a lung cancer charity set up to honor the late wife of Andrew Strauss, the former England captain, who died from the disease.

 

 


Mayor of town in north Japan bemoans lack of Olympic funds

Updated 15 September 2019
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Mayor of town in north Japan bemoans lack of Olympic funds

  • Tokyo is reportedly spending about $20 billion to prepare the city to host the games
  • Tokyo organizers have faced a series of hurdles as they prepare to host the games

TOKYO: The mayor of a town in northeastern Japan that will host Olympic soccer games says his city has received no funding from the central government that has promised to use the 2020 Tokyo Olympics to help in the reconstruction of the region.

The Japanese government and Tokyo 2020 organizers are hoping to use the Olympics to showcase Japan’s recovery from the 2011 earthquake and tsunami. Several Olympic events, including soccer and baseball, will be held in northeastern Japan.

But with less than a year to go before the opening ceremony, Yutaka Kumagai, the mayor of Rifu in Miyagi Prefecture, says his city has seen no funding from the central government.

“There is no help from the government, we don’t have any budget from them, none,” Kumagai said on Saturday. “Tokyo 2020 is said to be a symbol of the reconstruction but when it comes to the budget, we don’t have any budget from the Olympic games here in Rifu.”

Kumagai made the comments during a media tour of Miyagi Stadium, a 49,000-seat facility in Rifu that will host men’s and women’s football at the 2020 Olympics.

About 50,000 people are still displaced in the Tohoku region as of August, according to the Reconstruction Agency. Yoshiaki Suda, the mayor of Onagawa in Miyagi Prefecture, concurred with Kumagai. Like Rifu, Onagawa is a coastal city that sustained heavy destruction.

“We haven’t received any subsidy, even one yen, from the central government,” Suda said. “Whatever we do for the venues, for the hospitality for the Olympics, we have to do ourselves.”

Some media reports have made the claim that the Olympics have hampered the reconstruction efforts, taking workers away from the region to help with construction in Tokyo.

Japan is one of the most earthquake- and tsunami-prone areas in the world. On March 11, 2011, a magnitude 9.0 quake offshore caused a tsunami that triggered meltdowns at the Fukushima nuclear power plant. The quake and tsunami heavily damaged coastal neighborhoods in northeastern Japan and took more than 18,000 lives.

Tokyo, which projected total costs of about $7.5 billion in its winning bid for the games in 2013, is reportedly spending about $20 billion to prepare the city to host the games.

A group of anti-Olympic activists, many from outside Japan, have held small protests and other events this summer under the Japanese title “Han-gorin no Kai” — which translates roughly to No Olympics. They oppose Olympic spending, which they say cuts into budgets for housing and environmental issues.

They also call for more money to rebuild Fukushima prefecture located northeast of Tokyo. Organizers say Fukushima is a main focus of the Olympics, staging baseball, softball and soccer games there to persuade the world the area is safe.

Tokyo organizers have faced a series of hurdles as they prepare to host the games. In August, Tokyo’s summer heat forced an Olympic women’s triathlon qualifying event to be shortened because of high temperatures that are likely to impact next year’s games.

Tsunekazu Takeda, the head of the Japanese Olympic Committee, was forced to quit earlier this year when he was implicated in a vote-buying scheme to land the games. He has denied wrongdoing, but acknowledged he signed off on about $2 million that French investigators allege went to buy votes.