Baby son of UK’s Prince Harry and Meghan christened at private Windsor ceremony

1 / 4
This is the official christening photo released by the Duke and Duchess of Sussex on Saturday, July 6, 2019, showing Britain's Prince Harry, front row, second left and Meghan, the Duchess of Sussex with their son, Archie. Camilla, the Duchess of Cornwall sits at left. (AP)
2 / 4
Britain's Prince Harry, Duke of Sussex (R), and his wife Meghan, Duchess of Sussex hold their baby son, Archie Harrison Mountbatten-Windsor at Windsor Castle on July 6, 2019. (AFP/ Sussex Royal/ Chris Allerton)
3 / 4
Britain's Prince Harry and Meghan, Duchess of Sussex, during a photocall with their newborn son, in St George's Hall at Windsor Castle, Windsor, England. (File/AFP)
4 / 4
Meghan, Duchess of Sussex places her hand next to her baby son during a photocall in St George's Hall at Windsor Castle, in Berkshire, Britain May 8, 2019. (Reuters)
Updated 06 July 2019

Baby son of UK’s Prince Harry and Meghan christened at private Windsor ceremony

  • The 2-month-old son of the Duke and Duchess of Sussex will be baptized Saturday in a private chapel at the castle by Archbishop of Canterbury Justin Welby
  • He will wear a lace and satin christening gown that was also used for his cousins Prince George, Princess Charlotte and Prince Louis

LONDON: The youngest member of Britain's royal family, Archie Harrison Mountbatten-Windsor, was christened at Windsor Castle on Saturday in a private ceremony — too private for some royal fans.
The 2-month-old son of the Duke and Duchess of Sussex was baptized in a private chapel at the castle west of London by Archbishop of Canterbury Justin Welby, head of the Church of England.
Palace officials said that, in keeping with royal tradition, Archie wore a lace and satin christening gown — a replica of one made for Queen Victoria's eldest daughter in 1841 — that was also used for his cousins Prince George, Princess Charlotte and Prince Louis.
He was sprinkled with water from the River Jordan at an ornate silver baptismal font that has been used in royal christenings for more than 150 years.
Archie, born May 6, is the first child of Prince Harry and the former Meghan Markle, and seventh in line to the British throne.
His parents released two photos taken by fashion photographer Chris Allerton, including a black-and-white image showing the couple cradling a tranquil Archie between them.
It was accompanied by a color portrait of the young family surrounded by relatives, including Harry's brother Prince William and his wife Kate; Prince Charles and his wife Camilla; Meghan's mother Doria Ragland; and Jane Fellowes and Sarah McCorquodale, the sisters of Harry's late mother Princess Diana.
Archie's great-grandmother Queen Elizabeth II did not attend the christening because of a prior engagement.
Meghan and Harry have faced criticism for declining to reveal the names of Archie's godparents, and not giving the public a glimpse of the event — though that didn't stop well-wishers coming to Windsor with Union Jack flags, banners and even a cake to mark the occasion.
The royal couple's decision sparked controversy in part because of the recent revelation that their Windsor home was renovated with 2.4 million pounds ($3.06 million) of taxpayers' money.
Royal fan Anne Daley, who brought a home-baked cake to Windsor, said she was "very hurt" by the decision.
"That baby is Princess Diana's grandson. We should be able to see the christening," she said.


Egyptian civilian triggers discovery of ancient temple

Updated 12 December 2019

Egyptian civilian triggers discovery of ancient temple

  • An archaeological mission discovered an entire temple underneath the village of Mit Rahinah

CAIRO: Nobody in the Egyptian Ministry of Culture could believe that an illegal attempt by a civilian to prospect for monuments underneath his own home would lead to a grand discovery.

But that is just what happened when this week the ministry began archaeological excavations in the Mit Rahinah area, neighboring the pyramids of Giza.

The illegal digging by the 60-year-old resident alerted the authorities who arrested him in the first week of this month. The tourism authorities then went in and were surprised by the discovery.   

The archaeological mission discovered an entire temple underneath the village of Mit Rahinah.

According to a statement issued by the ministry, 19 chunks of pink granite and limestone bearing inscriptions depicting Ptah, the god of creation and of the ancient city Manf, were also discovered. 

Among the finds were also an artifact traceable to the reign of Ramesses II and inscriptions showing the king practicing a religious ritual. 

Egyptian researcher Abdel-Magid Abdul Aziz said Ptah was idolized in Manf. In one image, the god is depicted as a human wrapped in a tight-fitting cloth.

The deity was also in charge of memorial holidays and responsible for several inventions, holding the title Master of all Makers.

“There’s a statue of the god Ptah in the Egyptian Museum, in its traditional form as a mummy,” Abdul Aziz said.

“His hands come out from the folds of his robe ... as depicted in art pieces. Ptah appears as a bearded, buried man,” he added.

“Often he wears a hat, with his hands clutching Ankh (the ancient Egyptian hieroglyphic symbol for the key of life).”

Ayman Ashmawy, head of ancient Egyptian artifacts at the Ministry of Antiquities, said: “The artifacts are in the process of being restored, and have been moved to the museum’s open garden in Mit Rahinah.” He added that work was being done to discover and restore the rest of the temple.

As for the illegal prospecting of the area by its people, Ashmawy said the residents of Mit Rahinah were seeking to exploit the monuments.

He added that the law forbids prospecting for archaeological monuments, and that doing so could lead to a long prison sentence and a major fine, up to hundreds of thousands of Egyptian pounds. 

Mit Rahinah contains a large number of monuments, which have been discovered by chance. The area is home to an open museum, 20 km south of Cairo.

“What we see from current discoveries in Mit Rahinah are just snapshots of an ancient city that was once vibrant,” Ilham Ahmed, chief inspector of the archaeological mission, told Arab News.