Corruption siphoning $3.6 trillion away from global development work: OIC chief

The Organization of Islamic Cooperation (OIC), Dr. Yousef Al-Othaimeen. (OIC)
Updated 24 April 2019

Corruption siphoning $3.6 trillion away from global development work: OIC chief

  • The IPHRC meeting, being held at its headquarters in Jeddah through April 25, will address a range of issues, most notably ways to combat corruption

JEDDAH: The multitrillion-dollar cost of corruption was siphoning vital funds away from initiatives to help develop some of the world’s most impoverished countries, a Saudi gathering of leading human rights officials has been told.
The secretary-general of the Organization of Islamic Cooperation (OIC), Dr. Yousef Al-Othaimeen, has warned that widespread bribery and the theft of public funds was seriously undermining efforts to protect human rights.
During his speech at the inaugural ceremony of the 15th regular session of the OIC’s Independent Permanent Human Rights Commission (IPHRC) on Tuesday – delivered on his behalf by the organization’s assistant secretary-general for humanitarian affairs, Hesham Youssef – Al-Othaimeen revealed the global cost of corruption to be a staggering $3.6 trillion.
The secretary-general said the inability to put an end to the problem presented an obstacle to wise governance and sustainable development, eventually leading to the impoverishment of developing countries.
He noted that according to World Economic Forum statistics, the cost of corruption represented 5 percent of the world’s gross national income, a figure which negatively impacted on the poorest and most vulnerable people.
The IPHRC meeting, being held at its headquarters in Jeddah through April 25, will address a range of issues, most notably ways to combat corruption.
In his opening address, the recently elected IPHRC chairman, Akmal Saidov, thanked Saudi Arabia for hosting the session and the secretary-general for his support. He also reviewed the commission’s most significant activities planned for the current year.
Saidov said that the IPHRC will hold its sixth international forum – to deal with youth rights – in Uzbekistan next October and noted that the commission will send a delegation to the occupied Palestinian territories, in coordination with the OIC’s General Secretariat.


Sarah Alkhedheiri, sherpa of Youth 20

Updated 23 October 2020

Sarah Alkhedheiri, sherpa of Youth 20

Sarah Alkhedheiri is the sherpa of Youth 20 (Y20), one of the eight independent engagement groups of the G20. Y20 aims to deliver the voice of the young to the G20 while representing the younger generation in G20 countries and beyond.

Alkhedheiri is a graduate student of social and public policy at the London School of Economics and Political Science.

She worked as a senior initiatives manager at Misk Foundation’s Misk Global Forum, focused on global citizenship. 

Before joining Misk, Alkhedheiri worked as a consultant at McKinsey & Company, focusing on the public and social sectors.

Alkhedheiri has a BA in political science and international affairs from Northeastern University in Boston. She is a member of the Global Shapers Community and was curator of the Riyadh Hub from 2017 to 2018.

Recently, the three-day virtual summit of the Y20 engagement group ended with a call to the world’s biggest economies to sustain efforts to empower the youth.

Alkhedheiri said that “nobody becomes a global citizen — we are already global citizens.” 

She urged young people to “take action, and start where you are with what you have” in order to become a “community of active global citizens.”

Y20 delegates have “shown us the perfect example of active global citizens from around the world,” Alkhedheiri said.

During each day of the Y20 Summit, participants explored a key theme that has been a focus of delegates during the year.