At least six Pakistanis among New Zealand terror attack victims

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Relatives and neighbors pray for Pakistani citizens Rashid Naeem, and his son Talha Naeem, who were reportedly killed in the Christchurch mosque shooting, at their native home in Abbottabad, Pakistan, Saturday, March 16, 2019. (AP)
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Relatives and neighbors gather at the native home of Pakistani citizens Rashid Naeem, and his son Talha Naeem, who were reportedly killed in the Christchurch mosque shooting, in Abbottabad, Pakistan, Saturday, March 16, 2019. (AP)
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Relatives talk to Nadeem Rashid, second left, bother of Pakistani citizen Rashid Naeem, who was reportedly killed along with his son Talha Naeem in the Christchurch mosque shooting, at their home in Abbottabad, Pakistan, Saturday, March 16, 2019. (AP)
Updated 17 March 2019
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At least six Pakistanis among New Zealand terror attack victims

  • The six confirmed dead include 48-year-old Naeem Rashid and his 21-year-old son, Talha Naeem
  • Naeem migrated to New Zealand with his family in 2009 and was a teacher

CHRISTCHURCH: Pakistan's foreign minister says at least six Pakistanis were killed in the New Zealand mosque shootings.
Shah Mahmood Qureshi says authorities in Christchurch, where the shootings took place, are trying to determine whether three other Pakistanis who have been missing since Friday's attack were among the fatalities.
He said Saturday that the six confirmed dead include 48-year-old Naeem Rashid and his 21-year-old son, Talha Naeem.
Naeem migrated to New Zealand with his family in 2009 and was a teacher.
A total of at least 49 people were killed on the attacks on two mosques.


New York City Mayor de Blasio ends 2020 presidential bid

Updated 20 September 2019
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New York City Mayor de Blasio ends 2020 presidential bid

  • The mayor, who is barred from seeking a third four-year term in New York in 2021, struggled to build a national profile and stand out in a crowded field
  • De Blasio had failed to qualify for a Sept. 12 debate that featured the 10 leading candidates for the party’s nomination

NEW YORK: New York City Mayor Bill de Blasio on Friday said during an MSNBC television appearance that he was dropping out of the 2020 presidential campaign.
De Blasio, 58, launched his candidacy in May with the central campaign message “Working People First,” becoming the 24th Democrat to attempt to take on President Donald Trump in next year’s election.
The mayor, who is barred from seeking a third four-year term in New York in 2021, struggled to build a national profile and stand out in a crowded field that includes former Vice President Joe Biden and a long list of experienced politicians.
News of the mayor ending his presidential bid was greeted with sarcasm by Trump.
“Oh no, really big political news, perhaps the biggest story in years! Part time Mayor of New York City, @BilldeBlasio, who was polling at a solid ZERO but had tremendous room for growth, has shocking dropped out of the Presidential race,” Trump tweeted early on Friday. “NYC is devastated, he’s coming home!“
De Blasio had registered little support in polls and was eclipsed by progressive US senators Bernie Sanders and Elizabeth Warren.
De Blasio said on MSNBC’s “Morning Joe” that a “central reason” for his decision was the party’s rules for qualifying for televised debates. He had failed to qualify for a Sept. 12 debate that featured the 10 leading candidates for the party’s nomination.
“The bar is so high so early that for a lot of us — clearly, some of my fellow chief executives, governors — couldn’t make that cut,” de Blasio said. “It’s clear to me it’s a high bar, and that it’s one I’m not going to be able to meet.”
De Blasio had emphasized during the campaign a list of progressive wins under his leadership, including universal pre-kindergarten, the end of the policing practice known as stop-and-frisk and paid sick leave, all in a city that has a bigger population, more than 8 million, than most US states.
Most New Yorkers had appeared unenthused about de Blasio’s presidential aspirations. A Quinnipiac University poll in April found more than three-quarters of New Yorkers did not feel he should make a White House bid.