These Pakistani women artists are using social media to #LeadChange

Updated 13 March 2019

These Pakistani women artists are using social media to #LeadChange

ISLAMABAD: In the past few years, social media, particularly Instagram, has emerged as the social media platform of choice for many contemporary Pakistani women artists who use it to promote their art and create a space for a meaningful exchange of dialogue and ideas about women’s rights and issues. Here are some Pakistani women artists and designers to follow on Instagram for their creativity as much as their activism on and offline.
SHEHZIL MALIK




Shehzil Malik shared a photo after plastering a large scale poster of 1 of the 3 original artworks she created for Aurat March 2019 in Lahore. (Photo courtesy: Shehzil Malik/Instagram)




In collaboration with Nigat Dad of Digital Rights Foundation, Malik created this original piece for a new web portal Dad's organisation was launching to make reporting harassment in the digital sphere easier for women. (Photo courtesy: Shehzil Malik/Instagram)




Inspired by Meesha Shafi's 'Me Too' story and the subsequent harassment Shafi faced, Malik created a portrait of the singer which was later used as the backdrop of Shafi's performance on 'Pepsi Battle of the Bands'. (Photo courtesy: Shehzil Malik/Instagram)




'Women in Public Spaces,' one of Malik's comics she drew in 2015 reflecting her experience as a woman occupying public space in Pakistan. (Photo courtesy: Shehzil Malik/Instagram)


Did you see the Aurat March posters plastered around Lahore? That was the genius of Shehzil Malik. In 2015, Malik drew a viral comic inspired by her experience as a woman in public spaces in Pakistan, which gained her a large following. Her graphic, high-color saturated pieces have since captured the public imagination. Malik has also launched a fashion line with a feminist bent and her drawing of Meesha Shafi was used as stage art atPepsi Battle of the Bands.
SAMYA ARIF




Samya Arif was commissioned to create art work for Pakistani rock Sufi band Junoon for their reunion concert in December of last year. (Photo courtesy: Samya Arif/Instagram)




Arif's second book cover was for Sabyn Javeri's collection of short stories 'Hijabistan,' the chosen cover was Arif's piece titled 'Cosmic Ninja'. (Photo courtesy: Samya Arif/Instagram)




Arif's piece aiming to depict a powerful and hopeful image of the future for women. (Photo courtesy: Samya Arif/Instagram)




Arif's piece aiming to depict a powerful and hopeful image of the future for women. (Photo courtesy: Samya Arif/Instagram)
Cover art for Nadia Akbar's 'Goodbye Freddie Mercury'. (Photo courtesy: Samya Arif/Instagram)

Karachi-based Samya Arif’s list of clients and collaborators reads like a drool-inducing menu of the who’s who of the Pakistani music scene: Junoon, Mooroo and the Mekaal Hasan Band, that small unknown indie band by the name of Coldplay, as well as mega brands like Coke Studio, Al Jazeera and Magnum. Arif, who teaches part time at her alma mater the Indus Valley School of Art & Architecture uses visual art and illustration to make eye catching designs such as the cover arts of novels ‘Hijabistan’ and ‘Goodbye Freddie Mercury,’ and to celebrate womanhood.
MALIHA ABIDI




Cover of Maliha Abidi's book 'Pakistan for Women' a collection of illustrations by Abidi depicting 50 of Pakistan's most iconic women. (Photo courtesy: Maliha Abidi/Instagram) 




Inspired by UN Women's 'end Dowry abuse' campaign, Abidi created this illustration with a bride's jewellery strewn with the word 'dowry'. (Photo courtesy: Maliha Abidi/Instagram)




The late Asma Jehangir is one of the many women Abidi has illustrated and whose story she has included in her book 'Pakistan for Women'. (Photo courtesy: Maliha Abidi/Instagram)




An in process shot of a painting of Madam Noor Jehan, one of Pakistan's most revered singers. (Photo courtesy: Maliha Abidi/Instagram)


Maliha Abidi paints colorful and arresting portraits celebrating Pakistan’s women icons. Based in the UK, Abidi compiled her illustrations, such as those of the late Asma Jehangir, Noor Jehan, Nazia Hassan, Malala Yousafzai and Pakistan’s first female firefighter Shazia Parveen, into a book called ‘Pakistan for Women’ showcasing 50 Pakistanis who have contributed to the fabric of the nation. Abidi has also used her work to highlight women’s issues like dowry abuse, domestic violence and child marriage.
AREEBA SIDDIQUE




An illustration of a girl's wall including a poster of a girl with the words "Girls Just Wanna Have Their Revenge Mostly". (Photo courtesy: Areeba Siddique/Instagram)




A portrait Areeba Siddique made of her mom. (Photo courtesy: Areeba Siddique/Instagram)




Siddique's illustrations are clever commentary on life for some girls in Pakistan with strict parents and a lifestyle mix of both the traditional and contemporary. (Photo courtesy: Areeba Siddique/Instagram)




Siddique illustrates women getting ready for a wedding. (Photo courtesy: Areeba Siddique/Instagram)

Areeba Siddique’s drawings on her Instagram page have the most clever detailing: A cell phone lit up with texts from mom next to fingers applying the words “Follow me on Instagram” in henna on another person; inside the intricate pattern of the mehndi design is this sentence: “no more boys name in our henna. ONLY INSTAGRAM USER NAMES.’ With nearly 67,000 followers, Karachi’s Siddique shares not only her feminist artwork and illustrations depicting the delightfully mundane happenings in the lives of mostly hijab-clad women but also presents glimpses of her own personal style and design process. She most recently collaborated with a homeware line that put her artwork on mugs and dishes.
FATIMA BAIG




A take on 'Rosie the Riveter' Fatima Baig's work focusses on portraying South Asian beauty and strength. (Photo courtesy: Fatima Baig/Instagram)




A common theme in Baig's work is the relationship between women and spirituality showcased with the inclusion of cosmic elements like the moon and stars in her pieces. (Photo courtesy: Fatima Baig/Instagram)




Similar to many of the contemporary artists listed here, Baig is using her talent to share shine on Brown women and their many reiterations. (Photo courtesy: Fatima Baig/Instagram)




A portrait of living legend Sufi-Qawal master, Abida Parveen by Fatima Baig. (Photo courtesy: Fatima Baig/Instagram)


The beauty of the body, of diversity and of spirituality are the main stays in the art created by Fatima Baig. A native of Rawalpindi, she creates power-packed, color-saturated images depicting strong women of diverse backgrounds, ethnicities, skin tones and body sizes. There are recognizable shout outs in her work to regional dress, jewelry, people (including her portrait of Abida Parveen) and a playful approach to incorporating the cosmos and the connection between women and the spirit. 
MAHOOR JAMAL




In a unique take on fashion editorials, Jamal used illustrations atop of fashion photography for this spread. (Photo courtesy: Mahoor Jamal/Instagram)




South Asian women presented in unexpected ways is a common theme in Jamal's work, like this painting with a renaissance vibe but Pakistani aesthetics in the subjects clothing and features. (Photo courtesy: Mahoor Jamal/Instagram)




Dark skin, dark hair, South Asian shapes and sizes are prominent features of Jamal's work, like this illustration she posted on Eid with the caption, 'Eid Mubarak'. (Photo courtesy: Mahoor Jamal/Instagram)




Mixing the elements of fashion photography with her gift of illustration. (Photo courtesy: Mahoor Jamal/Instagram)

Combining the worlds of illustration, design and photography Mahoor Jamal has become a person to watch in both the art and fashion worlds. With a unique approach to artistry Jamal has worked with fashion campaigns and editorials in both photography and text. Her work depicts women both realistic and fantastical, incorporating desi aesthetics like jewelry and clothing with breathtaking control.
HAFSA KHAN




Pop art like that made popular by Andy Warhol has been reimagined with a Pakistani twist by artist Hafsa Khan. (Photo courtesy: Hafsa Khan/Instagram)




Khan contrasts current happenings (like pizza) against classic South Asian ones (like a background of henna motifs) to create graphic pieces that play around with identity. (Photo courtesy: Hafsa Khan/Instagram)




Khan includes lots of jewellery in her pieces as a part of South Asian identity and in particular to show the regality of South Asian women. (Photo courtesy: Hafsa Khan/Instagram)

 




Titled 'Louis Vuitton Khan,' Khan shares on her Instagram projects which are painted or drawn on designer boxes and utilizing popular high end designer prints like this one. (Photo courtesy: Hafsa Khan/Instagram)

US-based Hafsa Khan has grown a strong following across social media for capturing the beauty of South Asian women, drawn in pop art. When talking about her work on her website Khan said, “I want you to notice the regality of the women.” Hands wearing mehndi and decked out in rings and bangles, nose rings and teekas, and traditional dresses skilfully reimagine the classic pop art graphics of yesteryear and merge them with South Asian aesthetics. The images of brown skinned women and their hands contrast against neon pops of colors, bold backgrounds and even at times designer logos leave a lasting impression.


Ex-PM Khan to announce timing of anti-government long march in Multan today

Updated 5 sec ago

Ex-PM Khan to announce timing of anti-government long march in Multan today

  • Khan plans to bring ‘a sea of people’ to Islamabad while seeking early elections
  • The former prime minister has vowed to protest until fresh polls are announced

ISLAMABAD: Pakistan’s former prime minister Imran Khan is expected to announce the date for his anti-government long march to Pakistan’s federal capital at a power show in Multan on Friday, according to a video clip of him addressing his supporters which was shared by one of his aides on Twitter.

Last month, Khan became the first prime minister in Pakistan’s history who was driven out of power in a no-confidence vote.

He has since accused the United States of orchestrating the downfall of his administration with the help of his political rivals, saying that Washington was vexed at his desire to pursue an independent foreign policy.

US officials have repeatedly denied the allegation.

“Our last political gathering before the Islamabad march will take place tomorrow [on Friday] in Multan,” he can be seen telling a group of his supporters in a video clip shared by Usman Dar who advises him on youth affairs.

“I will announce the day when my entire nation must reach Islamabad,” he said, adding the actual objective of the march was to secure “real freedom” for Pakistan.

Khan, who is also the chairman of Pakistan Tehreek-e-Insaf (PTI) party, has called for early elections in the country while promising to hold political protests until the new government announces the date for the next polls.

Khan previously warned the government that a “sea of people” would arrive in Islamabad on his call.


Pakistan’s foreign minister defends ex-PM Khan’s Russia visit in New York

Updated 20 min 39 sec ago

Pakistan’s foreign minister defends ex-PM Khan’s Russia visit in New York

  • Bilawal Bhutto-Zardari says Khan could not have foreseen the beginning of the war during his visit
  • Pakistani FM describes India’s decision to revoke Kashmir’s status as an insult to the United Nations

ISLAMABAD: Pakistan’s foreign minister Bilawal Bhutto-Zardari on Thursday defended Imran Khan for visiting Moscow the day Russian President Vladimir Putin ordered his forces to invade Ukraine, saying the former prime minister could not have foreseen that the war was going to begin during his visit.

The timing of Khan’s trip to Russia annoyed Western nations who were trying to internationally isolate Putin’s administration for launching the war in his neighborhood. The heads of various foreign missions in Pakistan also wrote a joint letter to the country’s previous administration, urging it to condemn the Russian aggression in Ukraine soon after the invasion.

Pakistan’s new foreign minister, who is currently in New York to attend a global food security conference at the United Nations headquarters, told a news conference he would “absolutely defend” the former prime minister.

“Pakistan’s [former] prime minister conducted that trip as part of Pakistan’s foreign policy and without knowing … at the time that the current conflict would start,” he said. “I believe it is very unfair to punish Pakistan [for that visit].”

Pakistan’s foreign office also maintained in the past that Khan’s Russia visit had been in the making for a long time, adding it was not possible to postpone it shortly before it was scheduled to start.

The former prime minister, who was ousted from power in a no-confidence vote last month, said he was trying to pursue an independent foreign policy by strengthening relations with Russia and China which led to the downfall of his administration under an international conspiracy hatched by the United States.

His assertion has been repeatedly denied by US officials.

“Pakistan is not part of any conflict,” Bhutto-Zardari said while reiterating his country’s position on the war in Ukraine. “Pakistan would not wish to be part of any conflict. We would like emphasize on the importance of peace and dialogue.”

Asked about India’s decision to revoke the semi-autonomous status of the disputed Kashmir region, he described it as an insult to the United Nations its Security Council resolutions.

Prime Minister Narendra Modi’s government annulled Kashmir’s special constitutional status on August 5, 2019, to annex the Muslim-majority state with the rest of the Indian union.

The administration in New Delhi more recently published a list of redrawn political constituencies for the Himalayan territory under its control earlier this month, giving greater representation to the region’s Hindu areas while paving the way for fresh elections.

“The actions of August 5, 2019, and May 5, 2022, by India in illegally occupied Jammu and Kashmir is not only an insult to the people of Kashmir but is an insult to the United Nations and to the Security Council’s resolutions,” he said.


Three killed as fire in world’s largest pine nut forest in Pakistan enters tenth day

Updated 19 May 2022

Three killed as fire in world’s largest pine nut forest in Pakistan enters tenth day

  • The fires have affected different parts of the Koh-e-Sulaiman mountain range in Pakistan’s southwest
  • National Disaster Management Authority helicopter arrived today to extinguish fire with little luck

QUETTA: A massive forest fire that has been raging for ten days in different parts of the Koh-e-Sulaiman mountains in southwest Pakistan intensified on Wednesday, with three people reported dead as provincial and federal disaster management authorities struggled late into Thursday to douse the flames.

The fire has consumed hundreds of trees dotting the Koh-e-Sulaiman — a mountain range connecting the Pakistani provinces of Balochistan, Punjab and Khyber Pakhtunkhwa — and forced residents of nearby villages to move to safer locations.

The Koh-e-Sulaiman region is home to the world’s largest Chilghoza (pine nuts) forest, annually producing about 640,000 kilograms of the edible seed. It also houses different species of animals and birds, including chukar partridges, ibex goats and rabbits, which are under threat from the fires.

The first fire started on May 9 in Musakhail district, lasting over a week and affecting pine nut trees in a 22 kilometers radius. The fire had barely died down when a second blaze erupted late on Wednesday in the Saraghalai area of district Sheerani, with three locals killed as they tried to help in rescue operations.

“Three local residents who tried to extinguish the fire got killed,” the top administrative official of the area, Zhob division commissioner Bashir Bazai, told Arab News. “Four people are still stranded as the district administration is making efforts to retrieve the bodies and rescue the stranded individuals.”

Smoke engulfs a pine nut forest in the Koh-e-Sulaiman mountain range in the Saraghalai area of district Sheerani in Pakistan's Balochistan province on May 19, 2022. (Photo courtesy: Forest Department Zhob)

Locals helping with the rescue operation said neither provincial nor federal authorities were equipped to handle the disaster.

“The federal and provincial departments dealing with the fire are not trained and equipped to extinguish the fire in the Saraghalai area since the flames are too high,” local activist Salmeen Khpalwak, who works on climate change and environmental protection projects in the area, told Arab News on Thursday. “The fire is heading toward villages and many families have migrated to safe locations.”

Firefighters and residents extinguish a fire that erupted in pine nut forest in district Musakhail in Pakistan's Balochistan province on May 16, 2022. (Photo courtesy: Forest Department Zhob)

Khpalwak said nearly 24 villages situated in the pine nut forest were currently in danger. He said the fire in Musakhail broke out during a thunderstorm when lightning hit but the reason behind the Saraghalai blaze was not yet known.

The National Disaster Management Authority (NDMA) sent a helicopter on Thursday to extinguish the fire, local officials said, though it was unable to put out the fire as it could not fly at a low altitude due to thick smoke and the mountainous terrain.

Muhammad Younus, who works with the Provincial Disaster Management Authority, said the NDMA had been requested to provide another helicopter due to the intensity of the fire.

“This morning, a helicopter splashed 3,500 liters of water fetched from the Sabakzai Dam about 45 kilometers away from the area engulfed in fire,” Atique Khan Kakar, a forest officer, told Arab News, “though it did not work.”


Amid economic crisis, Pakistan imposes ‘complete’ ban on imported cars, luxury items

Updated 19 May 2022

Amid economic crisis, Pakistan imposes ‘complete’ ban on imported cars, luxury items

  • Decision taken to “save precious foreign exchange,” PM Sharif says
  • Information minister says government has finalized fiscal management plan 

ISLAMABAD: The Pakistan government on Thursday announced a complete ban on imported cars and non-essential items in a latest effort to tackle a growing economic crisis in the country.  

Pakistan is currently facing dwindling foreign exchange reserves, as its currency continues a downward spiral against the US dollar and a deal for the revival of a $6 billion loan program with the International Monetary Fund (IMF) hangs in the balance.  

On Thursday, Prime Minister Shehbaz Sharif announced his decision to ban non-essential items, saying the move would help Pakistan save “precious foreign exchange.”

“We will practice austerity and financially stronger people must lead in this effort so that the less privileged among us do not have to bear this burden,” he tweeted.  

Information minister Marriyum Aurangzeb announced the government had finalized a fiscal management plan to deal with the economic crisis.  

“Yesterday, it was decided that for the first time in Pakistan’s history, all non-essential and luxury items will be banned completely,” she said. “These include food items, luxury items and all imported cars.”

Aurangzeb said Pakistan was currently facing “an emergency situation” and Pakistanis would see the impact of difficult decisions on foreign exchange reserves within two months.  

She said the government attached the highest priority to decreasing Pakistan’s dependency on imports and introducing an export-oriented economic policy.  

“Local industry, local producers and local industries in Pakistan will benefit from this [policy],” she said. “This economic plan will also promote employment in the country.”

The minister announced the government’s decision to ban imported mobile phones, home appliances, dry fruits, fruits, crockery items, private weapons, shoes and chandeliers.  

Other banned items include decoration pieces, sauces, frozen meat, sanitary ware, doors, window frames, fish, frozen fruits, carpets, reserved food items, tissue papers, furniture, makeup and shampoo items, confectionary, luxury mattresses and sleeping bags.  


Pakistan’s volatile currency hits another historic low of Rs200 against US dollar

Updated 19 May 2022

Pakistan’s volatile currency hits another historic low of Rs200 against US dollar

  • Pakistani rupee declined by 0.81 percent in interbank market on Thursday
  • It has so far plunged by over Rs17 since the arrival of new government

KARACHI: Pakistan’s national currency continued to slump on Thursday, hitting another historic low of Rs200 against the US dollar in the interbank market amid rising demand for import payments and uncertainty related to talks with the International Monetary Fund (IMF) for the resumption of a $6 billion loan program.

The rupee declined by 0.81 percent, or Rs1.61, during the trading session today.

The currency depreciation continued despite the ongoing negotiations between the IMF and Pakistani authorities which started in Doha, Qatar, on Wednesday.

“The dollar was trading above Rs200 in the interbank market due to increasing demand from importers to make foreign payments,” Zafir Paracha, general secretary of the Exchange Companies Association of Pakistan, told Arab News.

He said the remittance inflow was also slow since exporters were not bringing export proceeds to the country owing to the rising rupee-dollar parity which was benefitting them.

The rupee has declined by Rs17.07 against the greenback since the new government took control of the country last month.

Aadil Jillani, head of economic division at Trust Securities & Brokerage Limited, blamed the gap between external financing requirements and Pakistan’s repayment capacity on lack of policy response from the government.

“[This is] constantly bleeding markets and the economy,” he said. “This economic meltdown is taking its toll as the dollar has hit an all-time high and is trading above Rs200 in the interbank and open markets.”

Pakistan’s discussions with the IMF have become complicated due to an economic relief package amounting to $1.7 billion which was announced by former prime minister Imran Khan earlier this year.

Prime Minister Shehbaz Sharif is hesitant to remove the fuel and power subsidies included in the package since his administration fears public backlash amid rising inflation.

Economists have advised the government, however, to undo these subsidies or risk greater political and economic damage.