These Pakistani women artists are using social media to #LeadChange

Updated 13 March 2019

These Pakistani women artists are using social media to #LeadChange

ISLAMABAD: In the past few years, social media, particularly Instagram, has emerged as the social media platform of choice for many contemporary Pakistani women artists who use it to promote their art and create a space for a meaningful exchange of dialogue and ideas about women’s rights and issues. Here are some Pakistani women artists and designers to follow on Instagram for their creativity as much as their activism on and offline.
SHEHZIL MALIK




Shehzil Malik shared a photo after plastering a large scale poster of 1 of the 3 original artworks she created for Aurat March 2019 in Lahore. (Photo courtesy: Shehzil Malik/Instagram)




In collaboration with Nigat Dad of Digital Rights Foundation, Malik created this original piece for a new web portal Dad's organisation was launching to make reporting harassment in the digital sphere easier for women. (Photo courtesy: Shehzil Malik/Instagram)




Inspired by Meesha Shafi's 'Me Too' story and the subsequent harassment Shafi faced, Malik created a portrait of the singer which was later used as the backdrop of Shafi's performance on 'Pepsi Battle of the Bands'. (Photo courtesy: Shehzil Malik/Instagram)




'Women in Public Spaces,' one of Malik's comics she drew in 2015 reflecting her experience as a woman occupying public space in Pakistan. (Photo courtesy: Shehzil Malik/Instagram)


Did you see the Aurat March posters plastered around Lahore? That was the genius of Shehzil Malik. In 2015, Malik drew a viral comic inspired by her experience as a woman in public spaces in Pakistan, which gained her a large following. Her graphic, high-color saturated pieces have since captured the public imagination. Malik has also launched a fashion line with a feminist bent and her drawing of Meesha Shafi was used as stage art atPepsi Battle of the Bands.
SAMYA ARIF




Samya Arif was commissioned to create art work for Pakistani rock Sufi band Junoon for their reunion concert in December of last year. (Photo courtesy: Samya Arif/Instagram)




Arif's second book cover was for Sabyn Javeri's collection of short stories 'Hijabistan,' the chosen cover was Arif's piece titled 'Cosmic Ninja'. (Photo courtesy: Samya Arif/Instagram)




Arif's piece aiming to depict a powerful and hopeful image of the future for women. (Photo courtesy: Samya Arif/Instagram)




Arif's piece aiming to depict a powerful and hopeful image of the future for women. (Photo courtesy: Samya Arif/Instagram)
Cover art for Nadia Akbar's 'Goodbye Freddie Mercury'. (Photo courtesy: Samya Arif/Instagram)

Karachi-based Samya Arif’s list of clients and collaborators reads like a drool-inducing menu of the who’s who of the Pakistani music scene: Junoon, Mooroo and the Mekaal Hasan Band, that small unknown indie band by the name of Coldplay, as well as mega brands like Coke Studio, Al Jazeera and Magnum. Arif, who teaches part time at her alma mater the Indus Valley School of Art & Architecture uses visual art and illustration to make eye catching designs such as the cover arts of novels ‘Hijabistan’ and ‘Goodbye Freddie Mercury,’ and to celebrate womanhood.
MALIHA ABIDI




Cover of Maliha Abidi's book 'Pakistan for Women' a collection of illustrations by Abidi depicting 50 of Pakistan's most iconic women. (Photo courtesy: Maliha Abidi/Instagram) 




Inspired by UN Women's 'end Dowry abuse' campaign, Abidi created this illustration with a bride's jewellery strewn with the word 'dowry'. (Photo courtesy: Maliha Abidi/Instagram)




The late Asma Jehangir is one of the many women Abidi has illustrated and whose story she has included in her book 'Pakistan for Women'. (Photo courtesy: Maliha Abidi/Instagram)




An in process shot of a painting of Madam Noor Jehan, one of Pakistan's most revered singers. (Photo courtesy: Maliha Abidi/Instagram)


Maliha Abidi paints colorful and arresting portraits celebrating Pakistan’s women icons. Based in the UK, Abidi compiled her illustrations, such as those of the late Asma Jehangir, Noor Jehan, Nazia Hassan, Malala Yousafzai and Pakistan’s first female firefighter Shazia Parveen, into a book called ‘Pakistan for Women’ showcasing 50 Pakistanis who have contributed to the fabric of the nation. Abidi has also used her work to highlight women’s issues like dowry abuse, domestic violence and child marriage.
AREEBA SIDDIQUE




An illustration of a girl's wall including a poster of a girl with the words "Girls Just Wanna Have Their Revenge Mostly". (Photo courtesy: Areeba Siddique/Instagram)




A portrait Areeba Siddique made of her mom. (Photo courtesy: Areeba Siddique/Instagram)




Siddique's illustrations are clever commentary on life for some girls in Pakistan with strict parents and a lifestyle mix of both the traditional and contemporary. (Photo courtesy: Areeba Siddique/Instagram)




Siddique illustrates women getting ready for a wedding. (Photo courtesy: Areeba Siddique/Instagram)

Areeba Siddique’s drawings on her Instagram page have the most clever detailing: A cell phone lit up with texts from mom next to fingers applying the words “Follow me on Instagram” in henna on another person; inside the intricate pattern of the mehndi design is this sentence: “no more boys name in our henna. ONLY INSTAGRAM USER NAMES.’ With nearly 67,000 followers, Karachi’s Siddique shares not only her feminist artwork and illustrations depicting the delightfully mundane happenings in the lives of mostly hijab-clad women but also presents glimpses of her own personal style and design process. She most recently collaborated with a homeware line that put her artwork on mugs and dishes.
FATIMA BAIG




A take on 'Rosie the Riveter' Fatima Baig's work focusses on portraying South Asian beauty and strength. (Photo courtesy: Fatima Baig/Instagram)




A common theme in Baig's work is the relationship between women and spirituality showcased with the inclusion of cosmic elements like the moon and stars in her pieces. (Photo courtesy: Fatima Baig/Instagram)




Similar to many of the contemporary artists listed here, Baig is using her talent to share shine on Brown women and their many reiterations. (Photo courtesy: Fatima Baig/Instagram)




A portrait of living legend Sufi-Qawal master, Abida Parveen by Fatima Baig. (Photo courtesy: Fatima Baig/Instagram)


The beauty of the body, of diversity and of spirituality are the main stays in the art created by Fatima Baig. A native of Rawalpindi, she creates power-packed, color-saturated images depicting strong women of diverse backgrounds, ethnicities, skin tones and body sizes. There are recognizable shout outs in her work to regional dress, jewelry, people (including her portrait of Abida Parveen) and a playful approach to incorporating the cosmos and the connection between women and the spirit. 
MAHOOR JAMAL




In a unique take on fashion editorials, Jamal used illustrations atop of fashion photography for this spread. (Photo courtesy: Mahoor Jamal/Instagram)




South Asian women presented in unexpected ways is a common theme in Jamal's work, like this painting with a renaissance vibe but Pakistani aesthetics in the subjects clothing and features. (Photo courtesy: Mahoor Jamal/Instagram)




Dark skin, dark hair, South Asian shapes and sizes are prominent features of Jamal's work, like this illustration she posted on Eid with the caption, 'Eid Mubarak'. (Photo courtesy: Mahoor Jamal/Instagram)




Mixing the elements of fashion photography with her gift of illustration. (Photo courtesy: Mahoor Jamal/Instagram)

Combining the worlds of illustration, design and photography Mahoor Jamal has become a person to watch in both the art and fashion worlds. With a unique approach to artistry Jamal has worked with fashion campaigns and editorials in both photography and text. Her work depicts women both realistic and fantastical, incorporating desi aesthetics like jewelry and clothing with breathtaking control.
HAFSA KHAN




Pop art like that made popular by Andy Warhol has been reimagined with a Pakistani twist by artist Hafsa Khan. (Photo courtesy: Hafsa Khan/Instagram)




Khan contrasts current happenings (like pizza) against classic South Asian ones (like a background of henna motifs) to create graphic pieces that play around with identity. (Photo courtesy: Hafsa Khan/Instagram)




Khan includes lots of jewellery in her pieces as a part of South Asian identity and in particular to show the regality of South Asian women. (Photo courtesy: Hafsa Khan/Instagram)

 




Titled 'Louis Vuitton Khan,' Khan shares on her Instagram projects which are painted or drawn on designer boxes and utilizing popular high end designer prints like this one. (Photo courtesy: Hafsa Khan/Instagram)

US-based Hafsa Khan has grown a strong following across social media for capturing the beauty of South Asian women, drawn in pop art. When talking about her work on her website Khan said, “I want you to notice the regality of the women.” Hands wearing mehndi and decked out in rings and bangles, nose rings and teekas, and traditional dresses skilfully reimagine the classic pop art graphics of yesteryear and merge them with South Asian aesthetics. The images of brown skinned women and their hands contrast against neon pops of colors, bold backgrounds and even at times designer logos leave a lasting impression.


Pakistan sends medicines, food items to Lebanon after deadly explosions

Updated 07 August 2020

Pakistan sends medicines, food items to Lebanon after deadly explosions

  • More than 150 people were killed and over 5,000 others were injured when a string of blasts rocked Beirut on August 4
  • FM Qureshi assured his Lebanese counterpart that the government and people of Pakistan stood in strong solidarity with the people of Lebanon

ISLAMABAD: Pakistan on Friday sent medicines and food items to Lebanon after a string of deadly explosions ripped through Beirut earlier this week, killing more than 150 people and injuring over 5,000 others.

Pakistan’s Ambassador to Lebanon Najeeb Durrani is handing over eight tons of relief items for the victims of Beirut explosions to senior Lebanese officials at the Rafic Hariri International Airport in Beirut on Aug. 7, 2020. (Photo courtesy Pakistan Embassy in Beirut)

According to an official statement released in Islamabad, the country’s foreign minister called his Lebanese counterpart and informed him about the relief assistance over the phone.
“Foreign Minister Shah Mahmood Qureshi, in a telephonic conversation, informed his Lebanese counterpart, Charbel Wehbe, that 8 tons of relief assistance consisting of medicines and food supplies sent by the Government of Pakistan as a token of solidarity would be delivered in Beirut today,” said the official statement.

Pakistan’s Ambassador to Lebanon Najeeb Durrani is handing over eight tons of relief items for the victims of Beirut explosions to senior Lebanese officials at the Rafic Hariri International Airport in Beirut on Aug. 7, 2020. (Photo courtesy Pakistan Embassy in Beirut)

It added that Qureshi also expressed deep sorrow and grief over the loss of precious lives, injuries to people, and extensive material damage caused by the explosions.
“The Foreign Minister underscored that, at this difficult time, Pakistan stood in strong support and solidarity with the brotherly Lebanese people,” the statement said.

Pakistan’s Ambassador to Lebanon Najeeb Durrani is handing over eight tons of relief items for the victims of Beirut explosions to senior Lebanese officials at the Rafic Hariri International Airport in Beirut on Aug. 7, 2020. (Photo courtesy Pakistan Embassy in Beirut)

Meanwhile, authorities in Lebanon received the relief package on Friday afternoon.
“The relief goods were handed over to Deputy Chief of Protocol Mr. Salem Al Achkar from the Ministry of Foreign Affairs and Emigrants and General Elias Abi Karam, Commander of Lebanon’s Air Force by Najeeb Durrani, Ambassador of Pakistan, today at 1530 at Rafic Hariri International Airport,” Pakistan’s embassy in Beirut confirmed in a statement.