Pakistan observes ‘Kashmir Black Day’

The people of Kashmir went on a general strike this week to bring international attention to what say are Indian killings and brutalities against innocent civilians in the region. (REUTERS/File)
Updated 27 October 2018

Pakistan observes ‘Kashmir Black Day’

  • Pakistan said it reiterates its moral, diplomatic and political support for Kashmir
  • Army chief described the Kashmir dispute between India and Pakistan as an unfinished business of partition of 1947

ISLAMABAD: President of Pakistan on Sunday said that Pakistan reiterated its moral, diplomatic and political support for the ‘cause of the people of Indian occupied Jammu and Kashmir’.
“27th October marks one of the darkest chapters of the Jammu & Kashmir history. On this day, seven decades ago, Indian forces landed in Srinagar to occupy, subjugate, oppress and terrorize the innocent people of Indian occupied Jammu and Kashmir (IoK) in blatant violation of international law,” President of Pakistan Dr. Arif Alvi said in a statement.
The statement added that the United Nations Security Council through several of its resolutions, has validated the Kashmiris’ right to decide their future through a fair and impartial plebiscite.
“Despite its commitment to the international community to enforce these resolutions, India has embarked on a path of punitive suppression and pathological genocide that continues to this day,” President Alvi said
Pakistan’s President said that India does not realize that it is “impossible to crush the spirit of a people once they commit to the achievement of their freedom” and added “Pakistan strongly supports the OHCHR (UN High Commissioner for Human Rights) Report’s recommendation to constitute a Commission of Inquiry (COI) to analyze the human rights situation in Indian occupied Jammu & Kashmir.”
On Friday, the Interior Ministry on Friday issued a notification to this effect, urging people to wear black armbands and observe a minute-long silence at 1pm on Saturday.
The Kashmiris in the Indian administered Kashmir went on a general strike this week to bring international attention to what they say are Indian killings and brutalities against innocent civilians in the region. Prior to that, the valley witnessed gunbattles between security personnel and armed inhabitants of the area which resulted in several casualties.
Indian forces have been accused of using explosives in densely-populated areas, as some residents blame them for detonating bombs in areas where they suspect the presence of armed rebels. It may be recalled that the United Nations’ High Commissioner for Human Rights launched a first-of-its-kind report on violence perpetrated by Indian forces in Kashmir, in June this year.
The report mentioned an excessive use of force against innocent civilians along with other brutal tactics – as such sexual violence and enforced disappearances – which were frequently being used to break the will of Kashmiris. While India dismissed the report as “tendentious and motivated”, Pakistan has undertaken several diplomatic initiatives to bring international attention to the Indian oppression of the region.
Pakistan’s army chief, General Qamar Javed Bajwa, while visiting troops at the Line of Control on Thursday, described the Kashmir dispute between India and Pakistan as an unfinished business of partition of 1947.
The Kashmiris have been uprising against Indian forces since 1989. According to some estimates, about 70,000 people have lost their lives since then. The residents of the valley say they will to continue to 'struggle for their self-determination.'


Nepalese climbers bag mountaineering’s last great prize: winter ascent of Pakistan’s K2

Updated 2 min 58 sec ago

Nepalese climbers bag mountaineering’s last great prize: winter ascent of Pakistan’s K2

  • One of the ten Nepalese mountaineers performed the feat without using an oxygen cylinder
  • K2 earned the nickname of ‘savage mountain’ since a large number of climbers lost their lives while trying to scale it

ISLAMABAD: A group of Nepalese climbers made history on Saturday by summiting the world’s second tallest mountain, K2, in winter, according to its team leader who made the announcement on Facebook only minutes after making the accomplishment. 

“The Karakorum’s ‘Savage Mountain’ has been summited in the most dangerous season: WINTER,” Chhang Dawa Sherpa exclaimed in his social media post.

His announcement was also confirmed by an official of the Alpine Club of Pakistan which deals with mountaineering expeditions in the country.

At 8,611 meters, K2 was the only peak among the 14 “8000ers” located in the Karakorum and Himalayan mountain ranges that remained unconquered during winter. 

Along the icy glaciers of the Karakoram, mountaineers and locals speak about K2 summits with a hushed reverence, and folklore in the area is rife with mythical stories of the mountain “permitting” climbers to reach its top — considered the ultimate honor granted to a mortal by nature. 

When a climb doesn't go as planned, locals tell each other the mountain refused to be scaled. 

“The Nepalese climbers finally reached the summit of Mt. K2 … this afternoon at 17:00 local time,” Dawa wrote. “This is the first winter ascent of the 2nd highest mountain in the world and the ONLY eight-thousander (8000er) to be climbed in winter. This is a greatest achievement in the history of mountaineering, this is a good example of team work … ‘If a mountain lets you climb it, no one can stop you.’” 

One of the ten Nepalese climbers, Mingma G, also became the first mountaineer to summit the peak in winter without an oxygen cylinder.

K2 earned the nickname of “savage mountain” since a large number of climbers — 86 in all — lost their lives while trying to scale it. 

In 2008, 11 climbers from an international expedition died in what was considered as the single worst accident in the history of mountaineering. 

K2 straddles the Pakistan-China border. While it is about two-and-a-half football fields shorter than Everest (8,848 meters), it is widely considered to be the toughest and most dangerous mountain to climb. 

More than 300 climbers have scaled K2 in spring and summer. Italians Achille Compagnoni and Lino Lacedelli were the first to reach its summit in the summer of 1954.