What We Are Reading Today: Sea people by Christina Thompson

Updated 17 May 2019
0

What We Are Reading Today: Sea people by Christina Thompson

  • The book combines narrative with facts in a very pleasant proportion

Sea People is a wonderful book about how and when the Polynesians ended up in Polynesia. 

Piecing together a vast number of elements including history, science, mysticism, folklore, archaeology and ancient genealogies, author Christina Thompson creates a mesmerizing account of the Polynesian puzzle. 

The book combines narrative with facts in a very pleasant proportion, said a review published in goodreads.com. 

“The really impressive facet of this book is the underlying theme of how western understanding of a foreign culture changes over time. The evolution of anthropological understanding as a study in ideas changing over time is fascinating,” it said.

The book “is essentially about the way centuries of well-intentioned Europeans have approached Polynesian culture as if it was a puzzle to be solved,” said another critic in goodreads.com. 

Thompson “sympathizes deeply with her cast of curious outsiders; she is herself a Westerner married to a Maori,” the review added. 


What We Are Reading Today: John Adams by David McCullough

Updated 26 May 2019
0

What We Are Reading Today: John Adams by David McCullough

In this powerful, epic biography, David McCullough unfolds the adventurous life-journey of John Adams, the brilliant, fiercely independent, often irascible, always honest Yankee patriot — “the colossus of independence,” as Thomas Jefferson called him — who spared nothing in his zeal for the American Revolution. 

Like his masterly, Pulitzer Prize-winning biography Truman, David McCullough’s John Adams has the sweep and vitality of a great novel, says a review published in goodreads.com.

It is both a riveting portrait of an abundantly human man and a vivid evocation of his time, much of it drawn from an outstanding collection of Adams family letters and diaries. In particular, the more than 1,000 surviving letters between John and his wife Abigail Adams provide extraordinary access to their private lives and make it possible to know John Adams as no other major American of his founding era.