What We Are Reading Today: The Way We Eat Now by Bee Wilson

Updated 16 May 2019
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What We Are Reading Today: The Way We Eat Now by Bee Wilson

  • A book on present-day eating habits

The Way We Eat Now is an insightful and astonishing book about our present-day eating habits. 

“It is both useful and informative, thoroughly and enterprisingly reported. When she is not hectoring, author Bee Wilson presents a remarkable array of data, often in unusual and striking charts, and delivers numerous surprises,” said Corby Kummer in a review published in The New York Times. 

Hummer said Wilson “shows that countries like Chile and cities like Amsterdam, which builds exercise into its urban design and takes a citywide multigenerational approach to eating better and eating together, are pointing the way toward the kind of change we need.” 

Wilson also “shows that such policies aren’t necessarily new: 18th-century France, in a kind of broken-windows approach to enforcing good food, had a policy of policing bread, since bad bread was a sign of social breakdown,” said Hummer. 

The critic added: “Wilson’s concluding chapters are concerned with repairing our broken connection to food.”


What We Are Reading Today: Before Our Eyes by Eleanor Wilner

Updated 21 August 2019
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What We Are Reading Today: Before Our Eyes by Eleanor Wilner

  • Before Our Eyes features widely anthologized works such as “Sarah’s Choice” and “Reading the Bible Backwards”

Before Our Eyes gathers more than 30 new poems by Eleanor Wilner, along with representative selections from her seven previous books, to present a major overview of her distinguished body of work. 

A poet who engages with history in lyrical language, Wilner creates worlds that reflect on and illuminate the actual one, drawing on the power of communal myth and memory to transform them into agents of change, says a review on the Princeton University Press website.

In these poems, well-known figures step out of old texts to alter their stories and new figures arise out of the local air — a girl with a fury of bees in her hair, homesick statues that step down from their pedestals, a bat cave whose altar bears a judgment on our worship of war, and a frog whose spring wakening invites our own. In the process, ancient myths are naturalized while nature is newly mythologized in the service of life.

Before Our Eyes features widely anthologized works such as “Sarah’s Choice” and “Reading the Bible Backwards.”