What We Are Reading Today: The Way We Eat Now by Bee Wilson

Updated 16 May 2019
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What We Are Reading Today: The Way We Eat Now by Bee Wilson

  • A book on present-day eating habits

The Way We Eat Now is an insightful and astonishing book about our present-day eating habits. 

“It is both useful and informative, thoroughly and enterprisingly reported. When she is not hectoring, author Bee Wilson presents a remarkable array of data, often in unusual and striking charts, and delivers numerous surprises,” said Corby Kummer in a review published in The New York Times. 

Hummer said Wilson “shows that countries like Chile and cities like Amsterdam, which builds exercise into its urban design and takes a citywide multigenerational approach to eating better and eating together, are pointing the way toward the kind of change we need.” 

Wilson also “shows that such policies aren’t necessarily new: 18th-century France, in a kind of broken-windows approach to enforcing good food, had a policy of policing bread, since bad bread was a sign of social breakdown,” said Hummer. 

The critic added: “Wilson’s concluding chapters are concerned with repairing our broken connection to food.”


What We Are Reading Today: The River Ki by Sawako Ariyoshi

Updated 25 May 2019
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What We Are Reading Today: The River Ki by Sawako Ariyoshi

The River Ki, short and swift and broad like most Japanese rivers, flows into the sea not far south of Osaka. On its journey seaward, it passes through countryside that has long been at the heart of the Japanese tradition. 

The River Ki dominates the lives of the people who live in its fertile valley and imparts a vital strength to the three women, mother, daughter and granddaughter, around whom this novel is built.

It provides them with the courage to cope, in their different ways, with the unprecedented changes that occurred in Japan between the last years of the last century and the middle of this century.

Sawako Ariyoshi, one of Japan’s most successful modern novelists, describes this social and cultural revolution largely through the eyes of Hana, a woman with the vision and integrity to understand the inevitability of the death of the traditional order in Japan, says a review published on googlereads.com.

Ariyoshi writes with a love for detail bound to a broader understanding of the importance of the geographical and biological forces that mold her characters — and the result is a story that flows with all the vitality of The River Ki itself.