Pakistani man kills daughter for not waking him up for Sehri meal: media

In this March 8, 2018 file photo, demonstrators hold banners and shout slogans during a rally to mark International Women's Day in Islamabad. According to Pakistan's local media, a man allegedly killed his daughter for not waking him up for sehri. The incident was a grim reminder of a Thomson Reuters Foundation poll conducted last year that found Pakistan to be the sixth most dangerous country for women. (Reuters)
Updated 16 May 2019
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Pakistani man kills daughter for not waking him up for Sehri meal: media

  • Thomson Reuters 2018 poll says Pakistan sixth most dangerous country for women
  • Human Rights Watch estimates 1,000 “honor killings” of women in Pakistan each year

ISLAMABAD: A man allegedly killed his daughter for not waking him up for sehri, a pre-dawn meal eaten before a day of fasting begins in the holy month of Ramadan, local media reported on Thursday.
Ramadan marks the month in which the Qur’an was revealed on Prophet Muhammad. Fasting, by abstaining from food and water from sunrise to sunset, is one of the five pillars of Islam, a grueling routine the devout repeat every day for a month. Fasting is meant to bring worshippers closer to God through steady remembrance, reflection and sacrifice and to challenge them to focus on good deeds and thoughts, rather than on material desires and instant gratification.
Pakistan’s Geo News channel reported that Gulzar Ahmed, a resident of Pakpattan in the central Punjab province, had shot his daughter dead because she did not wake him up in the morning for the sehri meal. The news channel reported that police had lodged a case against Ahmed on the complaint of the girl’s uncle Mukhtar Ahmed and an investigation was ongoing.
Ahmed was reportedly at large and police had launched a search to arrest him.
In 2013, Pakistan’s Dawn newspaper reported that a man shot his sister in the head in Rawalpindi for not serving him the sehri meal on time.
On July 18, 2013, Shabana Parveen, 23, was visiting her parents’ home from the home of her husband for a few days when she was killed by her brother who was angered that she had not prepared the sehri meal on time.
A Thomson Reuters Foundation poll found Pakistan to be the sixth most dangerous country for women in 2018. A Human Rights Watch report last year estimated that 1,000 “honor killings” — the practice of relatives murdering girls or women because they think the victim has brought shame or dishonor on the family — take place in Pakistan each year.


British Airways to resume Pakistan flights next week after a decade

Updated 23 May 2019
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British Airways to resume Pakistan flights next week after a decade

  • BA halted service to Pakistan in the wake of the 2008 Marriott Hotel bombing in Islamabad
  • BA will begin the London Heathrow-Islamabad service with the Boeing 787 Dreamliner

ISLAMABAD: British Airways will resume flights to Pakistan next week a decade after it suspended operations following a major hotel bombing, becoming the first Western airline to restart flights to the South Asian country.

BA halted service to Pakistan in the wake of the 2008 Marriott Hotel bombing in the capital Islamabad that took place during a period of devastating Islamist militant violence in Pakistan.

Security has since improved, with militant attacks sharply down in the mainly Muslim country of 208 million people, reviving Pakistan as a destination for tourist and investors.

“The final touches are coming together for the airline’s return ahead of the first flight on Sunday June 2,” British Airways said in a statement. It will launch a three-per-week service to London Heathrow, it said.

“We’re on board,” Pakistani Civil Aviation spokeswoman Farah Hussain said about the flights resumption.

BA, which is owned by Spanish-registered IAG, will begin the London Heathrow-Islamabad service with the airline’s newest long-haul aircraft, the Boeing 787 Dreamliner.

At present, only loss-making national carrier Pakistan International Airlines (PIA) flies directly from Pakistan to Britain, but its ageing fleet of planes is a frequent source of complaints by passengers.

Middle Eastern carriers Qatar Airways, Etihad Airways and Emirates have a strong presence in Pakistan and have been eating into PIA’s dwindling market share. Turkish Airlines also lays on a regular service to Pakistan.

Islamabad has been running international advertising campaigns to rejuvenate its tourism sector, which was wiped out by Islamist violence that destabilised the country following the Sept. 11, 2001 attacks in the United States and the U.S.-led war in Afghanistan.

“We hope customers in both the UK and Pakistan will enjoy the classically British service we offer, with thoughtful bespoke touches,” Andrew Brem, Chief Commercial Officer at British Airways, said in BA’s statement.

BA said there will be a halal meal option in every cabin and the airline would also ensure sauces in every meal do not contain alcohol or pork.