Turkey detains 2 militants trying to enter parliament

The suspects were members of the banned Revolutionary People’s Liberation Party-Front, also known as DHKP-C. (File/AFP)
Updated 15 May 2019
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Turkey detains 2 militants trying to enter parliament

  • The suspects were members of the banned Revolutionary People’s Liberation Party-Front, also known as DHKP-C
  • The DHKP-C is considered a terror organization by Turkey, the US and the European Union

ANKARA, Turkey: Police in Turkey have detained two suspected left-wing militants who tried to enter the country's parliament with sharp objects and a hoax explosive device, officials said Wednesday.

Fahrettin Altun, the presidential communications director, said in a tweet that the suspects were identified as members of the banned Revolutionary People's Liberation Party-Front, also known as DHKP-C.

He called their attempt a “terrorist act against the will and the peace of the nation.”

The state-run Anadolu Agency said the suspects — a woman and a man — arrived at the parliament building on Tuesday and tried to take a security official hostage before they were subdued.

The suspects were carrying sharp objects and an item that was made to look like a bomb, Anadolu reported.

The DHKP-C is considered a terror organization by Turkey, the US and the European Union.

The group is responsible for a string of assassinations and bombings in Turkey, including a 2013 suicide bomb attack on the U.S. Embassy in Ankara.

Altun said their “internal and external connections will be revealed and accounted for.”


Sudan's top opposition rejects strike call in protest rift

Updated 26 May 2019
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Sudan's top opposition rejects strike call in protest rift

KHARTOUM: Sudan's main opposition group and supporter of the protest movement on Sunday rejected its call to stage a two-day general strike, in the first sign of a rift within the movement negotiating the launch of civilian rule.
Talks between leaders of the umbrella protest movement, the Alliance for Freedom and Change, and army generals who seized power after ousting autocrat Omar Al-Bashir last month are deadlocked over who should lead a new governing body - a civilian or soldier.
In a bid to step up pressure on the generals, the protest movement has called for a general strike starting Tuesday, but the National Umma Party, a key backer of the movement, rejected the measure.
"We reject the general strike announced by some opposition groups" in the Alliance for Freedom and Change, the National Umma Party said in a statement.
"A general strike is a weapon that should be used after it is agreed upon by everybody," Umma said.
"We have to avoid such escalated measures that are not fully agreed."
The National Umma Party led by former premier Sadiq Al-Mahdi said any such decision should be taken by a council of leaders of the protest movement.
Such a council was still not in place and "will be composed in a meeting on Monday", it said.
It was Mahdi's elected government that Bashir, who himself was deposed on April 11, toppled in a coup in 1989.
In a recent interview with AFP, Mahdi warned protesters not to "provoke" the army's rulers as they had been instrumental in ousting Bashir.