YouTube’s PewDiePie ‘sickened’ by mosque gunman’s namedrop

PewDiePie (pictured) spoke out against the attack in New Zealand. (File photo: AFP)
Updated 16 March 2019
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YouTube’s PewDiePie ‘sickened’ by mosque gunman’s namedrop

STOCKHOLM: YouTube’s most-watched blogger PewDiePie said he was “sickened” after hearing that the gunman behind Friday’s New Zealand mosque massacre had promoted his videos before opening fire.
Forty-nine people were killed and dozens more wounded in shootings at two mosques in Christchurch, in an attack which sparked global outrage.
Footage of the attack was live streamed on Facebook by the gunman, who at one point can be heard saying: “Remember lads, subscribe to PewDiePie.”
The shooter, who is believed to be a 28-year-old Australian, has been arrested and charged with murder.
“Just heard news of the devastating reports from New Zealand Christchurch. I feel absolutely sickened having my name uttered by this person,” tweeted PewDiePie, a 29-year-old Swede whose real name is Felix Kjellberg.
“My heart and thoughts go out to the victims, families and everyone affected by this tragedy.”
The gunman, who was armed with semi-automatic weapons, had posted a hate-filled “manifesto” online before the carnage suggesting he was inspired by neo-Nazi ideology.
The Swedish blogger is known for posting humorous clips and playing livestreamed video games for his nearly 90 million followers on YouTube, making him the site’s most watched blogger.
Although he has had the highest number of YouTube subscribers for five years, he has regularly stoked controversy over his videos.
In September 2017, he apologized for using a racial slur in an expletive-laden rant against an opponent during a live-streamed computer game.
And six months before that, he lost contracts with YouTube and Disney over videos containing anti-Semitic insults or Nazi references.
In 2016, he was temporarily blocked from Twitter after joking he had joined the Daesh group.
But on Friday his supporters rallied to support him on Twitter.
“You had nothing to do with the tragedy that has unfolded, nor did you ask for your name to be invoked by a crazy, violent person,” wrote one person.
Another said: “This isn’t about a Swedish man who makes video entertainment for a living. This is about all of us. Protecting all of us. Not letting the narrative of mass murderers win.”


Bong d’Or: Korean director wins Cannes’ top prize

Updated 25 May 2019
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Bong d’Or: Korean director wins Cannes’ top prize

  • French-Senegalese director Mati Diop’s “Atlantics" wins festival’s second place award, the Grand Prize
  • Belgian brothers Jean-Pierre and Luc Dardenne shared the best director for “Young Ahmed”

CANNES, France: South Korean director Bong Joon-ho’s social satire “Parasite,” about a poor family of hustlers who find jobs with a wealthy family, won the Cannes Film Festival’s top award, the Palme d’Or, on Saturday.
The win for “Parasite” marks the first Korean film to ever win the Palme. In the festival’s closing ceremony, jury president Alejandro Inarritu said the choice had been “unanimous” for the nine-person jury.
The genre-mixing film had been celebrated as arguably the most critically acclaimed film at Cannes this year and the best yet from the 49-year-old director of “Snowpiercer” and “Okja.”
It was the second straight Palme victory for an Asian director. Last year, the award went to Japanese filmmaker Hirokazu Kore-eda’s “Shoplifters.”
Two years ago, Bong was in Cannes’ competition with “Okja,” a movie distributed in North America by Netflix. After it and Noah Baumbach’s “The Meyerowitz Stories” — another Netflix release — premiered in Cannes, the festival ruled that all films in competition needed French theatrical distribution. Netflix has since withdrawn from the festival on the French Riveira.
The festival’s second place award, the Grand Prize, went to French-Senegalese director Mati Diop’s “Atlantics.” Diop was the first black female director in competition at Cannes.
Belgian brothers Jean-Pierre and Luc Dardenne shared the best director for “Young Ahmed.”
Best actor went to Antonio Banderas for Pedro Almodovar’s “Pain and Glory,” while best actress was won by British actress Emily Beecham for “Little Joe.”
Although few quibbled with the choice of Bong, some had expected Cannes to make history by giving the Palme to a female filmmaker for just the second time.
Celine Sciamma’s period romance “Portrait of a Lady on Fire” was the Palme pick for many critics this year, but it ended up with best screenplay.
In the festival’s 72-year history, only Jane Champion has won the prize in 1993, and she tied with Chen Kaige’s “Farewell My Concubine.”