Son charged with killing parents, housekeeper in California

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Updated 16 February 2019
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Son charged with killing parents, housekeeper in California

SANTA ANA, California: A man was charged Friday with killing his parents and their housekeeper in an upscale Southern California community.
Camden Nicholson, 27, of Newport Beach, was charged with three counts of murder and an enhancement alleging multiple murders.
Nicholson was arrested Wednesday night after police found his parents, Richard and Kim Nicholson, and their housekeeper Maria Morse in the couple’s home in a gated community in Newport Beach, authorities said.
Police had gone to check on them after officers in the nearby city of Irvine talked to Camden Nicholson at a hospital emergency room.
Court filings say authorities suspect Nicholson may have killed his parents Monday and Morse a day later.
Heather Rangel, a spokeswoman for the Newport Beach Police Department, declined to provide further details about the killings.
Nicholson’s arraignment was delayed on Friday until March 8. His lawyer, Jessica Ann Watts, didn’t immediately respond to a message seeking comment.
Nicholson attended the University of Utah in fall 2009, spring 2010 and fall 2013, said Chris Nelson, communications director for the school. He did not receive a degree, Nelson said.
He also played on the university golf team in fall 2009, Nelson said.
Richard Nicholson had a long history in the clinical laboratory industry and previously served as president of the California Clinical Laboratory Association, said Michael Arnold, the group’s executive director.
In recent years, he worked as a consultant to what is now known as WestPac Labs, said Staton Shed, the company’s interim president.
“He was just a really good man, and he cared deeply for the patients,” Shed said. “We’re all just still trying to understand what happened, and you can’t make sense of it.”


Canada extends Iraq, Ukraine military training missions

Updated 18 min 38 sec ago
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Canada extends Iraq, Ukraine military training missions

  • Chrystia Freeland: "Ukraine can continue to count on Canada's unwavering support"
  • In Iraq, Canada will keep 250 special forces troops training Iraqi security forces

OTTAWA: Canada's defense and foreign ministers jointly announced Monday the extensions of military training missions in Iraq and Ukraine.
Both had been slated to wrap up at the end of March, but security concerns persist.
In Iraq, Canada will keep 250 special forces troops advising and training Iraqi security forces, plus several attack helicopters, as part of the US-led coalition against the Islamic State mission until the end of March 2021.
The number of troops deployed could ramp up to 850, if needed, and they will also help neighboring Jordan and Lebanon build their respective security capabilities, said officials.
Complementing those efforts, Canada last November assumed command of a new NATO mission. It has been contributing air power, medical support and help in training Iraqi forces since 2014.
"We have made significant and lasting progress, but we recognize that more work is needed. Now we must ensure that Daesh can never rebuild and threaten the safety of Iraq," Defense Minister Harjit Sajjan told a press conference, using an Arabic acronym for IS.
In Ukraine, some 200 Canadian troops will continue to provide arms, military engineering, logistics, military policing, and medical training until the end of March 2022.
Since 2015, Canada has so far trained nearly 11,000 Ukrainian soldiers.
Canada will also host a third Ukraine reform conference in Toronto on July 2-4.
"Ukraine can continue to count on Canada's unwavering support," Foreign Minister Chrystia Freeland said.
"It's very important to send a strong message to Ukraine, to the people of Ukraine, and to the international community that the invasion of Crimea and the annexation of Crimea are a grave breach of international law," she added.