Chris Pratt talks ‘The Lego Movie 2’ and his desire to see Dubai

Chris Pratt has taken on a number of roles in blockbuster films since his ascent to stardom. (Image supplied)
Updated 10 February 2019
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Chris Pratt talks ‘The Lego Movie 2’ and his desire to see Dubai

DUBAI: Chris Pratt has taken on a number of roles in blockbuster films since his ascent from scene-stealing sitcom cast-member to one of Hollywood’s biggest stars, but none may have been a better fit than Emmet in “The Lego Movie” series. After all, no other star has the boyish enthusiasm that Pratt has— and no star is easier to imagine playing with Lego on a lazy Saturday afternoon.
“Is there a Lego store in Dubai?” Pratt asks Arab News. “I want to go! I want to go to Dubai so bad! I heard it’s amazing and I want to see it.”
In the sequel to the acclaimed 2015 hit, Emmet remains as happy-go-lucky as ever — similar to the persona Pratt has built for himself. When Arab News compliments the watch Pratt his wearing, Pratt bashfully inspects it.
“Oh thanks, it’s from a company called ‘Cartler’,” Pratt says, seemingly unfamiliar with his own Cartier watch.
Pratt works double duty this time around, also taking on the role of Rex Dangervest — a scruffy chiseled action hero who rides a spaceship populated with dinosaurs. The character, a lampoon of Pratt’s own big-screen transformation over the years in such films as “Guardians of the Galaxy” and “Jurassic World,” is an idea Pratt supported from the start.
“That wasn’t a thing that I read and was surprised by. They called and told me what some of their intentions were and I told them to go forward and do as much of that as they wanted to. I was happy to have that portion of my career be a muse for Rex Dangervest and I thought that it really works and is really funny,” Pratt says.
While the first film focuses mainly on a young boy and his relationship with his favorite toys, the sequel puts its focus much more on the boy’s younger sister and her Lego toys, dubbed “The Systar System” in the film, and the difficulty the two have in playing together.
“I think they put in a lot of extensive research into how kids play with Lego, and they found some data that says that girls do play slightly differently than boys. They explore that without making it too on the nose. I thought it was really nuanced and thoughtful,” Pratt says.


Archaeologists discover Incan tomb in Peru

Updated 16 February 2019
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Archaeologists discover Incan tomb in Peru

  • The discovery was made on the Mata Indio dig site in the northern Lambayeque region
  • Despite evidence of looting, archaeologists recovered items including vases

LIMA: Peruvian archaeologists discovered an Incan tomb in the north of the country where an elite member of the pre-Columbian empire was buried, one of the investigators announced Friday.
The discovery was made on the Mata Indio dig site in the northern Lambayeque region, archaeologist Luis Chero told state news agency Andina.
Archaeologists believe the tomb belonged to a noble Inca based on the presence of “spondylus,” a type of sea shell always present in the graves of important figures from the Incan period, which lasted from the 12th to the 16th centuries.
The tomb had been broken into multiple times, possibly in search of treasure. But despite evidence of looting, archaeologists recovered items including vases.
The tomb also had unique architecture including hollows for the placement of idols.
Chero said the findings “demonstrate the majesty and importance of this site,” located 1,000 kilometers north of the capital Lima, and 2,000 kilometers from Cusco — capital of the Inca empire which stretched from southern Colombia to central Chile.