Saudi with beautiful collection of beasts wants to develop his animal kingdom into a zoo

Osama Al-Dughairi collection includes animals such as bears, crocodiles, lions, tigers and monkeys. (Photo/Social media)
Updated 12 January 2019
0

Saudi with beautiful collection of beasts wants to develop his animal kingdom into a zoo

  • There are only 100-250 leopards living in various parts of the Arabian Peninsula, said Dr. Ahmad Al-Bouq, a former spokesman of the Saudi Wildlife Authority

MAKKAH: Osama Al-Dughairi, a young Saudi in his 20s, is an animal lover to the core. His love for animals could be gauged through the fact that he has transformed his house and farm in Buraidah into a small zoo containing a variety of animals.
His collection includes animals such as bears, crocodiles, lions, tigers and monkeys. The animal enthusiast wishes to establish a zoo for people to see the various inhabitants of the animal kingdom living in better conditions and receiving proper care.
The young Saudi said love for animals runs in his family. “Some other members of my family share my passion,” he said.
Al-Dughairi said his family’s support encouraged him to continue his passion and increase the number of animals at his farm.
“I have a collection of lions, snakes, bears, Siberian tigers and Bengali cheetahs. Most of the animals grew up with me, they know my character and I know theirs,” Al-Dughairi said.
“I wish to establish a complete safari and I want to get an official permit in this regard,” he said. The Saudi man wants his dream project to be an attraction for domestic and foreign tourists. He firmly believes that the expertise he has acquired over time could be of great use to the Kingdom’s wildlife authorities. He has different ideas to share with the authorities to help increase the dwindling population of Arabian leopards and sand wolves.
The size of leopards’ habitat in Saudi Arabia has shrunk by 90 percent since the 19th century, according to an environmental study.
There are only 100-250 leopards living in various parts of the Arabian Peninsula, said Dr. Ahmad Al-Bouq, a former spokesman of the Saudi Wildlife Authority.
Leopards in the Kingdom are threatened by people killing them, hunting their prey and destroying their habitats, he added.
Al-Dughairi said: “Animals seek to live in environments where they are cared for constantly.”
“The feeding budget for most animals is huge. A lion needs up to 14 kilograms every day,” he said. “I will try to contact sponsors as soon as an official permit is issued.”
Al-Dughairi called on all those wishing to raise animals not to do so without having sufficient knowledge. He said at times it is perilous to enter the cages of predatory animals. “Their temper and head and tail movements need to be closely observed,” he cautioned.


Saudi Arabian doctors save lives around the world with Albalsam International

Updated 14 min 53 sec ago
0

Saudi Arabian doctors save lives around the world with Albalsam International

  • Specific teams are chosen for each trip based on the needs of the country in question, says team leader Emad Bukhari

RIYADH: Saudi Arabian nonprofit Albalsam International Organization and its team of surgeons have reportedly provided medical assistance to 2,524 patients in six different countries, including Yemen and Tanzania, it announced recently.

Albalsam, which opened in Switzerland in 2017 under the leadership of Saudi cardiologist and executive director Dr. Emad Bukhari, provides free medical services to underprivileged citizens around the world. 

The organization has seven teams specializing in different areas of medicine: Cardiovascular medicine and surgery; ophthalmic medicine and surgery; pediatric medicine and surgery; cardiac catheterization; pediatric urology; intensive care; and respiratory care.

Bukhari cites Qur’an 22:77 — “O you who have believed, bow and prostrate and worship your Lord and do good — that you may succeed” — as the inspiration behind the organization.

“By the grace of God first, and then by the hard work and devotion of my team and the generous assistance of those who donate to us, we are able to do good in service of humanity,” Bukhari told Arab News.

In numbers

560 cases of eye patients.

2,524 recipients.

46 surgery for children.

Specific teams are chosen for each trip based on the needs of the country in question, he explained: “If we are urgently needed to perform surgeries, we’ll send a larger surgical team of about 10 people. If we are sending doctors to offer training or teaching, we might send four.” The necessary resources for each trip are donated by various hospitals.

The doctors do their utmost to ensure that they are able to provide follow-up care for their patients too, and monitor their recovery. 

“We do not go anywhere unless we know we have the full means to offer the proper care,” Bukhari said. 

“We ensure that the local medical teams can carry on the treatment after we leave, training them ourselves if we have to, and we even follow up on the phone or over Skype, if necessary.”

To date, the organization has provided services including open-heart surgery, cardiac catheterization therapeutic intervention surgery, cardiac ultrasound diagnosis, cataract surgery, and various pediatric surgical procedures.

Bukhari said that the organization treats all patients equally, regardless of race, creed or gender.

“Islam teaches us that saving a single life is like saving all of humanity, and that is how Albalsam contributes to the growth and expansion of its work and puts its own mark on humanitarian action.”