Visa Inc. Expanding Global Football Portfolio Partnerships

File photo showing Visa logo. (Reuters)
Updated 06 December 2018
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Visa Inc. Expanding Global Football Portfolio Partnerships

  • Visa is partnering with the UEFA Women’s Football Competitions through 2025
  • These tournaments present an opportunity for the brand to build upon its success of 2018 FIFA World Cup Russia™

SAN FRANCISCO: Visa, the Official Payment Services Partner of FIFA, has announced partnerships with the Union of European Football Associations’ (UEFA) Women’s Football Competitions and the Confederation of African Football (CAF) Total Africa Cup of Nations tournament to evolve its sponsorship portfolio and connect with fans around the world. Leveraging its sponsorship expertise and success at the 2018 FIFA World Cup Russia™, Visa will implement its innovative payment technology at the tournament venues and deliver exclusive experiences for cardholders and clients. By tapping into the strength of the Visa brand and its influential role for fans in football, Visa will help to further elevate women’s football and these regional tournaments.
"Visa has strategically positioned itself at the center of football and these events will further exemplify the unique experiences only Visa can provide to fans across the globe," said Chris Curtin, chief brand and innovation marketing officer, Visa Inc. "These tournaments allow us distinctive opportunities to showcase Visa’s payment innovation, strengthen partnerships and highlight our evolved offerings to clients and fans."
Visa is partnering with the UEFA Women’s Football Competitions through 2025 to continue its efforts to inspire and empower women, as women’s football continues to grow at all levels. Through its partnership, Visa will collaborate with UEFA for the 2021 Women’s European Championships in the United Kingdom and the annual Women’s Champions League beginning in 2019. Complementing the national team tournament with the world’s finest club competition allows Visa to be at the center of women’s football and strengthens its efforts around diversity, acceptance, and inclusion leading up to the FIFA Women's World Cup France 2019™.
Visa also announced its partnership with CAF as a sponsor of the Total Africa Cup of Nations (AFCON) tournament in 2019 and 2021. The deal will make Visa the exclusive payment services provider at all venues and the official partner of the player escort program. With CAF, Visa will be able to capitalize on football’s popularity throughout the continent, tap into high-growth markets and continue to deliver exclusive benefits to its local communities, clients, partners and fans as they come together to support the best of African football.
Visa, a FIFA partner since 2007, continues to drive toward new payment innovation that provides fans with faster and enhanced experiences at checkout. Whether it be remote and mobile ticket purchasing, contactless payment technology at transit locations, in-seat ordering or new ways to pay for retail, Visa will utilize its transit, retail and commerce expertise to deliver innovative payments that reimagine the fan experience.
These tournaments present an opportunity for the brand to build upon its success of 2018 FIFA World Cup Russia™. Visa brought contactless payment technology to 12 tournament stadiums and curated unforgettable experiences for more than 250 clients and 3,000 consumers who traveled from over a hundred different countries. In 103 markets around the world, Visa partnered with more than 500 issuers and 40 merchants in 24 languages on a variety of FIFA-related activities, whether to run custom marketing programs, host in-market viewing parties or utilize Visa’s exclusive marketing campaign assets to drive mutual business priorities.
Following the FIFA Women's World Cup France 2019™ Draw on December 8, Visa will offer an exclusive opportunity for cardholders to be the first fans to purchase individual match tickets for the tournament. The exclusive presale phase will take place from December 10 through December 23 and tickets for all matches will be available. FIFA recently announced that 150,000 FIFA Women's World Cup France 2019™ tickets have been sold since package sales opened in September.


‘Don’t be too optimistic’: Huawei employees fret at US ban

Updated 36 min 48 sec ago
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‘Don’t be too optimistic’: Huawei employees fret at US ban

  • This week Google, whose Android operating system powers most of the world’s smartphones, said it would cut ties with Huawei
  • Another critical partner, ARM Holdings, said it was complying with the US restrictions

BEIJING: While Huawei’s founder brushes aside a US ban against his company, the telecom giant’s employees have been less sanguine, confessing fears for their future in online chat rooms.
Huawei CEO Ren Zhengfei declared this week the company has a hoard of microchips and the ability to make its own in order to withstand a potentially crippling US ban on using American components and software in its products.
“If you really want to know what’s going on with us, you can visit our Xinsheng Community,” Ren told Chinese media, alluding to Huawei’s internal forum partially open to viewers outside the company.
But a peek into Xinsheng shows his words have not reassured everyone within the Shenzhen-based company.
“During difficult times, what should we do as individuals?” posted an employee under the handle Xiao Feng on Thursday.
“At home reduce your debts and maintain enough cash,” Xiao Feng wrote.
“Make a plan for your financial assets and don’t be overly optimistic about your remuneration and income.”
This week Google, whose Android operating system powers most of the world’s smartphones, said it would cut ties with Huawei as a result of the ban.
Another critical partner, ARM Holdings — a British designer of semiconductors owned by Japanese group Softbank — said it was complying with the US restrictions.
“On its own Huawei can’t resolve this problem, we need to seek support from government policy,” one unnamed employee wrote last week, in a post that received dozens of likes and replies.
The employee outlined a plan for China to block off its smartphone market from all American components much in the same way Beijing fostered its Internet tech giants behind a “Great Firewall” that keeps out Google, Facebook, Twitter and dozens of other foreign companies.
“Our domestic market is big enough, we can use this opportunity to build up domestic suppliers and our ecosystem,” the employee wrote.
For his part, Ren advocated the opposite response in his interview with Chinese media.
“We should not promote populism; populism is detrimental to the country,” he said, noting that his family uses Apple products.
Other employees strategized ways to circumvent the US ban.
One advocated turning to Alibaba’s e-commerce platform Taobao to buy the needed components. Another dangled the prospect of setting up dozens of new companies to make purchases from US suppliers.
Many denounced the US and proposed China ban McDonald’s, Coca-Cola and all-American movies and TV shows.
“First time posting under my real name: we must do our jobs well, advance and retreat with our company,” said an employee named Xu Jin.
The tech ban caps months of US effort to isolate Huawei, whose equipment Washington fears could be used as a Trojan horse by Chinese intelligence services.
Still, last week Trump indicated he was willing to include a fix for Huawei in a trade deal that the two economic giants have struggled to seal and US officials issued a 90-day reprieve on the ban.
In Xinsheng, an employee with the handle Youxin lamented: “I want to advance and retreat alongside the company, but then my boss told me to pack up and go,” followed by two sad-face emoticons.