Police: Chinese national killed by son of Pakistani business partner

Policemen standing around the car used by Chen Zhu when an assailant opened fire, killing him and injuring his friend in Karachi on Feb. 5. (Photo by Dawn)
Updated 06 May 2018
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Police: Chinese national killed by son of Pakistani business partner

KARACHI: The managing director of a Chinese shipping company was killed by a contract killer hired by the son of his Pakistani partner, a police officer told Arab News on Sunday.

Chen Zhu, 45, was murdered in Neelum Colony near the Zamzama area in the upscale Defense Housing Authority neighborhood on Feb. 5, the officer said.
Police identified the deceased as the managing director of Cosco Saeed Karachi Shipping Private Ltd.
Superintendent Tauqeer Naeem said Chen and his friend Ye Fan were shopping in Neelum Colony when an assailant opened fire on them, killing Chen and injuring Ye.
On Saturday, police produced two individuals, Saqib Ahmed and Rehan Hashim, before a local court, saying they had killed the Chinese national. Police demanded the physical remand of the accused for further interrogation.
Raja Umar Khattab, a counterterrorism officer in Karachi, said Ahmed and Hashim were interrogated along with several other employees.
“They were making contradictory statements. When we probed them further, they confessed that they’d killed Chen,” Khattab told Arab News.
Ahmed, who was marketing director at the shipping company, is the son of Chen’s Pakistani partner Shakeel Ahmed, Khattab said.
When Chen came from Jakarta to become managing director, he found financial irregularities, prompting him to investigate the matter, police interrogators were told by the accused and other staff members.
Chen pointed out that Saqib’s job as marketing director violated the company rule forbidding the employment of two people from the same family. 
Chen fired Saqib, which led the latter to hire a contract killer. Police identified the killer from CCTV footage, but he is yet to be arrested.
The police officer said the murder was not an attempt to sabotage the China-Pakistan Economic Corridor (CPEC).
On May 5, the Counterterrorism Department (CTD) said it had foiled an attempt to target CPEC-related projects by arresting two alleged terrorists associated with a separatist Sindhi nationalist outfit.
CTD official Chaudhry Arif told Arab News that they had carried out attacks against Chinese nationals associated with a CPEC project in December 2016.


Taliban says its fighters will join Afghan security forces after US troops leave

Updated 23 July 2019
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Taliban says its fighters will join Afghan security forces after US troops leave

  • Taliban spokesman Suhail Shaheen says Taliban will be part of any future government in Kabul
  • Possibility of a peace deal in the next month, even before Eid on August 11, Shaheen says

ISLAMABAD: Taliban political spokesman Suhail Shaheen said on Tuesday thousands of Taliban fighters would become part of the Afghan army and other security forces after US and other foreign troops left Afghanistan following a peace deal with the United States. 
The United States and the Taliban are close to an agreement to end an 18-year-long Afghan civil war. The deal is expected to be centered on a US pledge to withdraw troops in exchange for a Taliban promise not to let Afghanistan be used as a base for terrorism, officials say.
US Special Representative for Afghanistan Reconciliation Zalmay Khalilzad will travel to Afghanistan and Qatar from July 22 – August 1 to restart talks with the Taliban in Doha.
“We have agreed that the army will stay as an institution,” the Taliban spokesman told Arab News via telephone when asked about the fate of thousands of Taliban fighters after the peace deal. “The army is required and will remain as a base, as a foundation but reforms are needed.”
He said participants at Moscow’s intra-Afghan conference this month had also called for reforms in Afghan security institutions, adding that future intra-Afghan meetings would decide how reforms would be introduced.
“Yes of course they (Taliban) will be part of the security system. They have rendered huge sacrifices for the liberation of the country,” Shaheen said.
To another question about whether the Taliban would be part of any future political system and the government, the Taliban spokesman answered in the affirmative adding: “But they will not be the part of the present administration. There will be a new system and a new government and we will definitely be part of that.”
When asked if the Taliban could become a political party when foreign troops withdrew, Shaheen said: “Our leadership will decide about the future policy. Our top priority is to end the occupation and second, to establish an Islamic government and we will take Afghans into confidence. Our leaders will decide as to how would we work.”
He said the Taliban would allow women the right to education, jobs and business under Islamic principles, adding that they would have to observe the Islamic veil.
“There had been no curbs on women education during our previous government. But we had been in the state of war that time and had no financial resources and the priority had been to maintain security as there had been anarchy and chaotic situation that time. But we want the world to help us and we will establish good relations with the world and to solve all our problems under an Islamic system,” Shaheen said.
He said the Taliban neither recognized the present system in Kabul nor the constitution in its present form.
“We recognize the constitution as a necessity and want another constitution,” Shaheen said. “We think other institutions are also necessary but we do not recognize the present institutions and that is why we are holding intra-Afghan conferences to discuss how the constitution and institutions should be.”
When asked if the Taliban recognized the present democratic system, Shaheen said: “We believe in an Islamic system.” 
He said there was a possibility the Taliban and the United Sates could “conclude certain final points” in the possible peace deal within a month and even before the Muslim festival of Eid, likely to be celebrated in Afghanistan on Aug. 11.
“I am hopeful we will reach an agreement before Eid,” he said.
To a question about US Secretary of State Mike Pompeo’s statement that he hoped to have a peace deal by September 1, Shaheen said he was hopeful an agreement could materialize even before that as “we want to end bloodshed and destruction in our country.”
“The ball is in their (US) court,” Shaheen said. “They should come up with a reasonable offer.”