China becomes most popular destination for overseas studies in Pakistan

In this file photo, A man walks past New Oriental Education & Technology Group headquarters in Beijing, China. (REUTERS)
Updated 06 May 2018
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China becomes most popular destination for overseas studies in Pakistan

  • Domestic efforts combined with the attractiveness of studying in China have changed the mindset of Pakistan’s young generation.
  • Pakistan considers China as one of its closest friends and partners.

BEIJING: China has become the most popular destination for overseas studies in Pakistan as number of Pakistani students has risen from 5,000 to existing 22,000 during the last five years.

The number of Pakistani students studying science and technology, engineering, medical sciences, media studies, and arts in different cities of China has increased manifold along with the progress of energy, communication and infrastructure projects being completed under the China-Pakistan Economic Corridor (CPEC).

The Chinese government is providing more scholarships to Pakistani students than students of other Asian countries.

Pakistani students belonging to almost all parts of the country are taking advantage of scholarships offered by Chinese government under the Belt and Road Initiative (BRI), according to some educationists here on Sunday.

For a Pakistani student who is studying in Beijing Institute of Technology (BIT), the high number of Pakistani students in China is due to the “strong bond” between China and Pakistan.

“Pakistan considers China as one of its closest friends and partners, and China considers Pakistan as its ‘Iron Brother.’”

Pakistani students are not just coming for the affordable education and job prospects but also for general experience and quality of life possible in China’s big cities, Global Times, while quoting an official of the ministry of education, reported.

Domestic efforts combined with the attractiveness of studying in China have changed the mindset of Pakistan’s young generation.

Traditionally, those who could afford it would send their children to the United Kingdom or the United States. But, now, Pakistanis from the upper and lower middle classes are apply for scholarships to study in China.

“The percentage of Pakistani students going to China to study is on the rise, while the percentage of those who seek Western education is lowered,” Syed Junaid Akbar, a Pakistani business school student at North China Electric Power University, said.

According to the statistics by the Ministry of Education of People’s Republic of China, as many as 489,200 students from 204 countries and regions studied in 935 higher institutions across China last year.

The top five source countries were Pakistan, South Korea, Thailand, the United States and India.

The number of students studying liberal arts subjects remained the highest, accounting for 48.45 percent of the total.

The number of those studying engineering, management, science, art and agriculture increased significantly, with a year-on-year growth of over 20 percent.

Moreover, 58,600 Chinese government scholarship students from 180 countries including Pakistan studied in the country in 2017, accounting for 11.97 percent.


South Korea becomes first country to support WHO fight HIV outbreak in Sindh

Updated 19 July 2019
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South Korea becomes first country to support WHO fight HIV outbreak in Sindh

  • Despite Seoul’s decision to contribute $100,000, UN health agency continues to face a significant funding gap
  • Around 935 people, including 760 children, have been reported infected by the virus since April

ISLAMABAD: South Korea will extend humanitarian assistance worth $100,000 in cash to help control the outbreak of the Human Immunodeficiency Virus (HIV) in Pakistan’s southern Sindh province, the World Health Organization, which will channel the funds to the South Asian nation, said on Friday.
Spread mainly in the Larkana district of Sindh, HIV had infected 935 people in total as of July 13, including 760 children under the age of 15.
WHO Representative in Pakistan, Dr. Palitha Mahipala, met South Korean Ambassador Kwak Sung-kyu in Islamabad earlier this month, and sought his support to deal with the HIV outbreak. Korean authorities in Seoul responded positively and said they would help the WHO fight the spread of the virus.
According to a media statement, WHO will continue to face a huge funding gap despite South Korea’s commitment since its project requires $4.5 million for the next two years to deal with the epidemic.
“I expect that other governments and international NGOs will join South Korea in supporting WHO’s efforts in responding to the HIV outbreak in Pakistan,” Ambassador Kwak was reported to have said.
“WHO highly appreciates the valuable support made by the government of the Republic of Korea enabling WHO to scale up its response to the HIV affected population in Larkana district,” Palitha said during her meeting with the South Korean ambassador.
The spread of HIV in Ratodero, on the outskirts of Larkana, was first detected by medical practitioners in April this year. Since then, health authorities have screened thousands of people to determine the scale of the problem.
In rural Sindh — long bridled by harsh poverty and illiteracy — access to information about HIV and other diseases has kept the large swathes of the population in the dark about how the virus is transmitted. Healthcare facilities in the province are meagre and negligence by inadequately-qualified doctors is common.
At the heart of the current crisis is one paediatrician, Dr. Muzaffar Ghangharo, who used contaminated syringes while treating his patients in Ratodero, police officials have said. Dr. Muzaffar Ghanghro was arrested on April 30 and has been charged with unintentional murder.
Senior Sindh police officer Sartaj Jagirani told Arab News last month that 123 infected children, whose family members had recorded their statements with police, had been treated by Ghangharo.