India hosts regional security talks on Afghanistan

India hosts a two-day Delhi Regional Security Dialogue on Afghanistan, which was attended by officials from Russia, Iran and five Central Asian republics.
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Updated 11 November 2021

India hosts regional security talks on Afghanistan

  • Afghan representatives were not invited, while regional powers Pakistan and China declined to attend
  • India used to be region’s largest provider of aid to Afghanistan, spending about $3 billion on development projects

NEW DELHI: India on Wednesday hosted a regional security summit with officials from Russia, Iran and five Central Asian republics to discuss the situation in neighboring Afghanistan after the Taliban takeover of the country.

The two-day Delhi Regional Security Dialogue on Afghanistan is the first such meeting since the Taliban took control of the country following the fall of the US-backed Afghan government on Aug. 15. The first editions of the dialogue were hosted by Iran in 2018 and 2019.

Security chiefs from Russia, Iran, Kazakhstan, Kyrgyzstan, Tajikistan, Turkmenistan and Uzbekistan arrived in New Delhi, while two other regional powers, Pakistan and China, declined to attend. 

Afghan government representatives were not invited to take part in the summit. 

“This is the time for close consultation amongst us … (and) among the regional countries,” India’s National Security Advisor Ajit Doval said as he opened the meeting.

“I’m confident that our deliberations will be productive … and will contribute to help the people of Afghanistan and enhance our collective security.”

The meeting underscores India’s attempts to protect its strategic interests in Afghanistan. Over the past two decades, India has spent about $3 billion on development projects in different parts of the neighboring landlocked country. As other powers look to cement their grip on the region, the Indian government has faced criticism for allowing New Delhi to be sidelined in Afghanistan while other players such as Pakistan and China sweep in.

Pakistan declined to attend the summit, with its National Security Adviser Moeed Yusuf last week saying India was a “spoiler” and not a “peacemaker” in Afghanistan, while China’s foreign ministry blamed “scheduling reasons” for not participating but said it remained open to bilateral talks. Some Indian foreign policy experts see the ongoing security meeting as India’s attempt to claim a role in the region. 

“This is something that is interesting, something that India has not done in the past,” Harsh V. Pant, director of strategic affairs program at the Delhi-based think tank Observer Research Foundation, told Arab News.

“India has been relatively reticent in the past on Afghanistan and has not really taken leadership. With this, India is bringing stakeholders together.”

He added that there is no option for India to do nothing in the face of a humanitarian crisis in Afghanistan.

“The burden falls on regional players. India not doing anything is not an option. It is therefore trying to engage with all the relevant partners,” Pant said. “India is not really looking at the situation as a bystander.”

While India used to be the region’s largest provider of development aid to Afghanistan, foreign policy expert Sanjay Kapoor sees its post-Taliban takeover concerns in the country as related mainly to security issues.

“India wanted to host this dialogue in March this year, but it could not get its act together. If it had succeeded in doing that in March or May, it would have had a different impact on Afghanistan,” Kapoor told Arab News.

“Now it is more concerned, along with other participating countries, about security issues. India doesn’t want Afghanistan to become a terror hub.”


US Senate approves $12 billion in new aid for Ukraine

Updated 58 min 32 sec ago

US Senate approves $12 billion in new aid for Ukraine

  • It provides $4.5 billion for Kyiv to keep the country's finances stable and keep the government running
  • It comes as Russian President Vladimir Putin plans to declare the annexation of parts of Ukraine

WASHINGTON: The US Senate approved $12 billion in new economic and military aid for Ukraine Thursday as part of a stopgap extension of the federal budget into December.
The measure, agreed by senators of both parties, includes $3 billion for arms, supplies and salaries for Ukraine’s military, and authorizes President Joe Biden to direct the US Defense Department to take $3.7 billion worth of its own weapons and materiel to provide Ukraine.
It also provides $4.5 billion for Kyiv to keep the country’s finances stable and keep the government running, providing services to the Ukrainian people.
It comes as Russian President Vladimir Putin plans to declare the annexation of parts of Ukraine occupied by Russian troops on Friday.
“Seven months since the conflict began, it’s crystal clear that American assistance has gone a long way to helping the Ukrainian people resist Putin’s evil, vicious aggression,” said Senate Majority Leader Chuck Schumer.
“But the fight is far from over, and we must, we must, continue helping the brave, valiant Ukrainian people.”
The Ukraine aid is part of a short-term extension of the federal budget, which is to expire at the end of the fiscal year on September 30 without the parties in Congress having agreed to a full-year allocation for fiscal 2022-23.
The extension, or continuing resolution, will keep the government running into December, but it has to first be approved by the House of Representatives to avoid shutting down parts of the government on Monday.


US charges ex-Army major and his wife over alleged plot to leak military health data to Russia

Updated 29 September 2022

US charges ex-Army major and his wife over alleged plot to leak military health data to Russia

  • The indictment alleges that the plot started after Russian President Vladimir Putin invaded Ukraine
  • Prosecutors said the pair wanted to try to help the Russian government by providing them with data

WASHINGTON: A former US Army major and his anesthesiologist wife have been criminally charged for allegedly plotting to leak highly sensitive health care data about military patients to Russia, the Justice Department revealed on Thursday.
Jamie Lee Henry, the former major who was also a doctor at Fort Bragg in North Carolina, and his wife, Dr. Anna Gabrielian, were charged in an unsealed indictment in a federal court in Maryland with conspiracy and the wrongful disclosure of individually identifiable health information.
The indictment alleges that the plot started after Russian President Vladimir Putin invaded Ukraine.
Prosecutors said the pair wanted to try to help the Russian government by providing them with data to help the Putin regime “gain insights into the medical conditions of individuals associated with the US government and military.”
The two met with someone whom they believed was a Russian official, but in fact was actually an FBI undercover agent, the indictment says.


Putin says conflicts in Ukraine, ex-USSR are ‘result of Soviet collapse’

Updated 29 September 2022

Putin says conflicts in Ukraine, ex-USSR are ‘result of Soviet collapse’

  • In the past month, the region has seen clashes between Kyrgyzstan and Tajikistan, and Armenia and Azerbaijan
  • Putin has regularly made nostalgic speeches about the USSR and served in the Soviet security services (KGB)

MOSCOW: Russian President Vladimir Putin said Thursday that conflicts in countries of the former USSR, including Ukraine, are the result of the collapse of the Soviet Union.
“It is enough to look at what is happening now between Russia and Ukraine, and at what is happening on the borders of some other CIS countries. All this, of course, is the result of the collapse of the Soviet Union,” Putin said in a televised meeting with intelligence chiefs of former Soviet countries.
In parallel to the military operation in Ukraine, armed conflicts have returned to various parts of the former Soviet empire.
In the past month the region has seen clashes between the two Central Asian countries of Kyrgyzstan and Tajikistan, and fighting between Armenia and Azerbaijan.
Putin pointed fingers at the West, saying it was “working on scenarios to fuel new conflicts” in the post-Soviet space.
Putin spoke a day before he is due to formally annex four Moscow-occupied Ukrainian regions, in a move that is expected to escalate the Ukraine conflict.
“We are witnessing the formation of a new world order, which is a difficult process,” Putin said, echoing earlier statements about the waning influence of the West.
Putin, who turns 70 next week, has regularly made nostalgic speeches about the USSR and served in the Soviet security services (KGB).
His statement comes during an exodus of Russian men fleeing a mobilization, including to ex-Soviet countries like Kazakhstan, whose president vowed to shelter Russian draft dodgers.


Germany to seek EU sanctions on Iran over protests crackdown: foreign minister

Updated 29 September 2022

Germany to seek EU sanctions on Iran over protests crackdown: foreign minister

  • “Within the framework of the EU, I am doing everything I can to get sanctions under way”

BERLIN: German Foreign Minister Annalena Baerbock on Thursday said she was pushing for EU sanctions on Iran over the Islamic republic’s lethal crackdown on protests sparked by the death of a young woman in police custody.
“Within the framework of the EU, I am doing everything I can to get sanctions under way against those in Iran who are beating women to death and shooting demonstrators in the name of religion,” Baerbock wrote on Twitter.


'Stand for each other': Afghan women rally in support of antigovernment protests in Iran

Updated 29 September 2022

'Stand for each other': Afghan women rally in support of antigovernment protests in Iran

  • Protesters gathered in front of Iranian embassy in Kabul chanting, 'women, life, freedom'
  • The protest was soon dispersed by Taliban security forces who fired into the air

KABUL: Afghan women rallied in front of the Iranian embassy in Kabul on Thursday, joining global protests over the death of a young woman in the custody of Iran’s morality police.

Mahsa Amini, 22, was detained in Tehran on Sept. 12 for failing to cover her hair modestly enough. Women who were arrested along with Amini have said she was beaten inside a police van. Three days later she died in hospital after falling into a coma.

Public anger over her death has prompted days of rage and street protests across Iran, in what has been the largest manifestation of dissent against the Iranian government in over a decade.

Protests have also spilled to other countries.

A group of about 25 women who gathered in front of the Iranian embassy in Kabul carried placards that read: “Beautiful Mahsa, your blood is our way and inspiration,” as they chanted “women, life, freedom” — the phrase that has been used by demonstrators in Iran.

A 24-year-old university student who participated in the protest told Arab News she had attended the rally in solidarity with the women of Iran.

“Women in Iran and we are facing the same oppression. We wanted to show that we can amplify the voices of our sisters in Iran while highlighting our own concerns for freedom and dignity,” she said, on condition of anonymity.

“The widespread protests in Iran supported by men and women also inspired us to continue our fight for the rights of Afghan women in Afghanistan. Afghan women have been brave enough to defy the Taliban’s restrictive attitude. We will not be silenced and we will rise again.”

The rights of Afghan women have been limited since the Taliban took control of the country after US-led forces withdrew from Afghanistan in August last year.

Although they had previously promised a softer version of the harsh rule during their first stint in power from 1996 to 2001, women have already been ordered to wear face cover in public, banned from making long-distance journeys alone, and prevented from working in most sectors outside of health and education.

Since September last year, permission from the Ministry of Justice is required to organize a protest. Slogans used during rallies must also be approved by authorities.

Soon after Thursday’s rally in front of the Iranian embassy began, it was dispersed by Taliban security forces, who fired into the air.

For Afghan women’s rights activist like Muzhgan Noori, the protest was a “fine example of sisterhood and solidarity among women sharing the same pain and concerns.”

“Afghan women have protested whenever they felt the need for it, and they should be able to do so now. The government must support and protect them instead of frightening them,” she told Arab News.

“I hope women continue to stand for each other.”