Dhaka airport opens COVID-19 test labs for UAE-bound foreign workers

Six privately run PCR facilities can deliver more than 5,000 test reports a day, official says. (Reuters)
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Updated 26 September 2021

Dhaka airport opens COVID-19 test labs for UAE-bound foreign workers

  • The privately run PCR labs at the Hazrat Shahjalal International Airport are aimed at outbound travelers who require proof that they are virus-free on arrival at their destinations

DHAKA: Bangladesh on Saturday opened six COVID-19 testing facilities at its largest airport in the capital Dhaka to facilitate international travel, mainly for its UAE-bound migrant workers impacted by flight restrictions in the wake of the pandemic, a government official said.

The privately run PCR labs at the Hazrat Shahjalal International Airport are aimed at outbound travelers who require proof that they are virus-free on arrival at their destinations.

They are the first at an airport in Bangladesh, one of three international hubs in the country, with a capacity to carry out more than 5,000 tests a day.

“We have set up all necessary facilities and equipment. We will conduct a test-run tonight and hand over the facilities to the civil aviation authorities,” Dr. Shariar Sazzad, the health officer in charge at the airport, told Arab News.

The tests are not covered by insurance, with each international traveler required to pay for COVID-19 screening.

“Each of the tests will cost around $20 at all six facilities at the airport,” Sazzad said.

Instalment of the testing facilities comes after the UAE in August lifted flight curbs for travelers from a list of previously suspended countries, including Bangladesh, provided they were fully vaccinated with a jab approved by the World Health Organization and tested negative for COVID-19 six hours before departure.

Since then, thousands of Bangladeshi migrant workers had been rallying for authorities to install PCR labs at the airport. On Sept. 6, Prime Minister Sheikh Hasina directed authorities to establish PCR testing facilities at all three international airports in Dhaka, Chattogram and Sylhet.

With nearly 1,250 cases a day, Bangladesh has struggled to combat a surge in COVID-19 infections driven by the highly contagious Delta variant. As of this week, only 9.3 percent of its population of 170 million people had received both doses of the COVID-19 jabs.

The South Asian nation’s economy has taken a beating from a lack of foreign remittances after thousands of migrant workers were unable to return to work due to travel curbs imposed by host nations.

The UAE is the second-largest destination for Bangladeshi migrant workers in the Gulf and the Middle East, with more than 1 million employed in the country.

However, tens of thousands of workers were impacted by flight curbs imposed by the Gulf state, with several left stranded in Bangladesh after returning home for a break.

Mohammad Abul Bashar, a 38-year-old construction worker in Dubai, is one example. He traveled to Bangladesh six months ago and is “desperately waiting” to return to the UAE.

“I was supposed to resume duty in the first week of September but couldn’t take the flight since there were no COVID-19 testing facilities at the airport,” he told Arab News.

“Now I am waiting to renew my visa and hope to travel within the next two weeks,” Bashar said, adding he was “so relieved” that PCR labs had finally been launched at the airport.

Salahuddin Chowdhury, another migrant worker, said that the delay in setting up the PCR labs had “caused huge losses for many.”

“I have been working as a salesperson at a shop in the UAE for six years and was supposed to return by mid-August. The delay has cost me around $300, which is a month’s salary,” Chowdhury, 27, told Arab News.

“I’m hoping to fly by the end of this week,” he added.

While workforce recruiting agencies welcomed the move to set up PCR labs at Dhaka airport, they urged authorities to launch more flights “to help as many workers as possible.”

“Every day, around 1,000-1,500 migrant workers would travel to the UAE (before the outbreak). Since more than 35,000 workers are now waiting to return to their workplaces, I think aviation authorities should introduce extra flights from Dhaka for the next few weeks,” Tipu Sultan, president of the Recruiting Agencies Unity Forum, told Arab News.

He also urged authorities to shoulder the costs of the tests.

“A majority of these migrant workers are extremely poor and spend a lot of money to secure a job in the overseas market, incurring huge debts for the visa and tickets. The $20 COVID-19 tests will be an extra burden on them,” he said.

Instead, Sultan suggests that the government either subsidise the cost or pay for it through “the expatriates’ welfare fund, which is also funded by the migrant workers.”

Shariful Hasan, migration program head for BRAC, a Bangladeshi-origin international NGO, agrees and said it was imperative for government ministries to make a “coordinated effort” and ease travel for migrant workers.

“Our migrant workers are desperate to return to work at any cost. Authorities should remain vigilant and ensure the smooth functioning of PCR labs installed at the airport,” Hasan told Arab News.

“These facilities will serve the migrant workers a lot, especially if other host countries also introduce the same travel rules as the UAE.”


China says moon rocks offer new clues to volcanic activity

Updated 14 sec ago

China says moon rocks offer new clues to volcanic activity

  • China in December brought back the first rocks from the moon since missions by the US and former Soviet Union in the 1970s

BEIJING: Moon rocks brought back to Earth by a Chinese robotic spacecraft last year have provided new insights into ancient lunar volcanic activity, a researcher said Tuesday.
Li Xianhua said an analysis of the samples revealed new information about the moon’s chemical composition and the way heat affected its development.
Li said the samples indicate volcanic activity was still occurring on the moon as recently as 2 billion years ago, compared to previous estimates that such activity halted between 2.8 billion and 3 billion years ago.
“Volcanic activities are a very important thing on the moon. They show the vitality inside the moon, and represent the recycling of energy and matter inside the moon,” Li told reporters.
China in December brought back the first rocks from the moon since missions by the US and former Soviet Union in the 1970s.
On Saturday, China launched a new three-person crew to its space station, a new milestone in a space program that has advanced rapidly in recent years.
China became only the third country after the former Soviet Union and the United States to put a person in space on its own in 2003 and now ranks among the leading space powers.
Alongside its crewed program, it has expanded its work on robotic exploration, retrieving the lunar samples and landing a rover on the little-explored far side of the moon. It has also placed the Tianwen-1 space probe on Mars, whose accompanying Zhurong rover has been exploring for evidence of life on the red planet.
China also plans to collect soil from an asteroid and bring back additional lunar samples. The country also hopes to land people on the moon and possibly build a scientific base there. A highly secretive space plane is also reportedly under development.
The military-run Chinese space program has also drawn controversy. China’s Foreign Ministry on Monday brushed-off a report that China had tested a hypersonic missile two months ago. A ministry spokesperson said it had merely tested whether a new spacecraft could be reused.


Melbourne readies to exit world’s longest COVID-19 lockdown

Updated 3 min 34 sec ago

Melbourne readies to exit world’s longest COVID-19 lockdown

  • Prime Minister Scott Morrison on Thursday confirmed the state had reached that target, with more restrictions set to ease as inoculations hit 80% and 90%

SYDNEY: Millions in Melbourne are readying to come out of the world's longest COVID-19 lockdown later on Thursday even as cases hover near record levels, with pubs, restaurants and cafes rushing to restock supplies before opening their doors.
Since early August, residents in Australia's second-largest city have been in lockdown — their sixth during the pandemic — to quell an outbreak fuelled by the highly infectious Delta strain.
Officials had promised to lift lockdowns once double-dose vaccinations for people aged above 16 exceeded 70% in Victoria state, of which Melbourne is the capital.
Prime Minister Scott Morrison on Thursday confirmed the state had reached that target, with more restrictions set to ease as inoculations hit 80% and 90%.
"The longest road has been journeyed in Victoria and that long road really starts to open up tonight," Morrison told Seven News on Thursday.
From 11:59 p.m. (1359 GMT) Thursday, pubs and cafes can have 20 fully vaccinated patrons indoors and 50 outdoors, while hairdressers can allow entry for five customers. Masks will still be mandatory both indoors and outdoors.
By then, the city of five million would have spent a cumulative 262 days, or nearly nine months, under stay-home orders since March 2020 — the world's longest, exceeding a 234-day lockdown in Buenos Aires, according to Australian media.
Pubs have begun to take more beer ahead of the reopening with Carlton & United Breweries, owned by Japan's Asahi Group Holdings, saying it had moved an extra 50,000 kegs to venues across the city on Thursday.
As businesses prepare to welcome customers, daily infections rose to 2,232 in Victoria on Thursday, the second highest daily count in any Australian jurisdiction during the pandemic.

VACCINATION SURGE
After largely stamping out infections in 2020, Australia has ditched its COVID-zero approach and is aiming to live with virus amid higher vaccinations after being rocked by a third wave of infections in the country's southeast since mid-June.
Despite the Delta wave, Australia has recorded only about 152,000 cases and 1,590 deaths, far lower than many comparable countries.
Cases in New South Wales, home to Sydney, rose for the third straight day on Thursday to 372 from 283 a day earlier.
Virus-free Queensland state is on alert after reporting its first new local case in two weeks — an unvaccinated Uber driver who spent 10 days in the community while potentially infectious.
Sydney and Canberra, the national capital, exited lockdowns last week after speeding through their vaccination targets. Other states are COVID-free or have very few cases.
With restrictions beginning to ease, Qantas Airways said it would ramp up daily flights between Sydney and Melbourne, one of the world's busiest domestic routes before the pandemic, to about 15 from the first week of November from just one now.


South Korea seeks space race entry with first homegrown rocket

Updated 8 min 51 sec ago

South Korea seeks space race entry with first homegrown rocket

  • South Korea's space program has a chequered record — its first two launches in 2009 and 2010, which in part used Russian technology, both ended in failure

SEOUL: South Korea is aiming to join the ranks of advanced spacefaring nations on Thursday when it attempts to put a one-ton payload into orbit using its first fully homegrown rocket.
The country has risen to become the world’s 12th-largest economy and a technologically advanced nation, home to the planet’s biggest smartphone and memory chip maker, Samsung Electronics.
But it has lagged in the headline-making world of spaceflight, where the Soviet Union led the way with the first satellite launch in 1957, closely followed by the United States.
In Asia, China, Japan and India all have advanced space programs, and the South’s nuclear-armed neighbor North Korea was the most recent entrant to the club of countries with their own satellite launch capability.
Ballistic missiles and space rockets use similar technology and Pyongyang put a 300-kilogramme (660-pound) satellite into orbit in 2012 in what Western countries condemned as a disguised missile test.
Even now, only six nations — not including North Korea — have successfully launched a one-ton payload on their own rockets.
The South will become the seventh if the Korean Satellite Launch Vehicle II, informally called Nuri, succeeds in putting its 1.5-ton dummy cargo into orbit from the launch site in Goheung, with an altitude of 600 to 800 kilometers being targeted.
The three-stage rocket has been a decade in development at a cost of 2 trillion won ($1.6 billion). It weighs 200 tons and is 47.2 meters (155 feet) long, fitted with a total of six liquid-fueled engines.

But the South Korean space program has a chequered record — its first two launches in 2009 and 2010, which in part used Russian technology, both ended in failure, the second one exploding two minutes into the flight and Seoul and Moscow blaming each other.
Eventually a 2013 launch succeeded, but still relied on a Russian-developed engine for its first stage.
The satellite launch business is increasingly the preserve of private companies, notably Elon Musk’s SpaceX, whose clients include the US space agency NASA and the South Korean military.
But one expert said a successful Nuri launch offered South Korea “infinite” potential.
“Rockets are the only means available to mankind to go out into space,” Lee Sang-ryul, the director of the Korea Aerospace Research Institute, told local paper Chosun Biz.
“Having such technology means we have fulfilled basic requirements to join this space exploration competition.”
Thursday’s launch is one step on an increasingly ambitious space program for South Korea, which President Moon Jae-in said would seek to launch a lunar orbiter next year, after he inspected a Nuri engine test in March.
“With achievements in South Korean rocket systems, the government will pursue an active space exploration project,” he said.
“We will realize the dream of landing our probe on the Moon by 2030.”


Biden’s Japan envoy pick vows to make Nissan executive case a priority

Updated 20 October 2021

Biden’s Japan envoy pick vows to make Nissan executive case a priority

  • Greg Kelly has denied charges he helped Carlos Ghosn hide 9.3 billion yen ($81.4 million) of Ghosn’s earnings over eight years through deferred payments
  • Rahm Emanuel, who President Joe Biden has nominated to be his ambassador to key US ally Japan, told senators he would deal with it as if he was a congressman and Kelly a constituent

WASHINGTON: Rahm Emanuel, nominee to be the next US ambassador to Tokyo, vowed at his Senate confirmation hearing on Wednesday to prioritize the case of an American former Nissan Motor executive who is facing a possible prison term in Japan.
In September, Japanese prosecutors asked a Tokyo court to send the executive, Greg Kelly, to prison for two years for his alleged part in helping Carlos Ghosn, Nissan’s ousted CEO, hide earnings.
When asked about the case, Emanuel, who President Joe Biden has nominated to be his ambassador to key US ally Japan, told senators he would deal with it as if he was a congressman and Kelly a constituent.
“I’ve already started to inquire about this and I want a report on my desk and ... if you start asking that, that goes from here to up here as a top priority,” he said.
“This is not just another piece of business to be checked out,” he said. “I’m going to be approaching this subject as a former US congressman, who knows what it means when you have a constituent at heart.”
Emanuel, the former mayor of Chicago, was responding to a question from Republican Senator William Hagerty of Tennessee, a former ambassador to Japan, who asked if he would make it a top priority to clear Kelly’s name.
Hagerty referred to Kelly as a “Tennessee citizen” and said he had been “deceived” into leaving the state to go to Japan where he was arrested in 2018, even though his lawyers believed he had committed no crime.
Hagerty said Japan was the number one investor in his home state and called the case “a real impediment” to the US-Japan economic relationship.
Japanese prosecutors called for the jail sentence for Kelly, who has been on bail in Japan since 2018, during closing arguments in a trial that began a last year.
A ruling in the case is expected next year, and if found guilty, Kelly could join two other Americans serving time in Japan after a court sentenced them in July for helping smuggle Ghosn out of Japan on a private jet hidden in luggage to Lebanon at the end of 2019, where he remains free as a fugitive.
Kelly has denied charges he helped Ghosn hide 9.3 billion yen ($81.4 million) of Ghosn’s earnings over eight years through deferred payments, saying that his only goal had been to retain a chief executive who could have been lured away by a rival automaker.
Both former Nissan executives allege they are victims of a boardroom coup by former colleagues worried that Ghosn would push through a merger between Nissan and Renault SA , its largest shareholder.


Death toll rises as unprecedented rainfall hits India’s Himalayan state

Updated 20 October 2021

Death toll rises as unprecedented rainfall hits India’s Himalayan state

  • Incessant rain has caused massive destruction in the state lying on the southern slope of the Himalaya mountain range
  • Ecologists blame unplanned development in the mountainous state for increasing climate-related disasters

NEW DELHI: Nearly 50 people have died in flash floods triggered by unprecedented heavy rains in the northern Indian state of Uttarakhand, authorities said on Wednesday, as environmentalist warn the Himalayan region is seeing the effects of climate change and rampant development.

Incessant rain since Monday has caused flooding, landslides, and massive destruction in the state lying on the southern slope of the Himalaya mountain range, in what is a second devastating incident related to extreme weather this year. In February, a portion of the Nanda Devi glacier broke off in Uttarakhand’s Chamoli district, triggering an avalanche and flooding that killed dozens of people.

"There has been massive damage. It will take time to return to normalcy," Uttarakhand chief minister Pushkar Singh Dhami told reporters on Wednesday. "Roads were washed away, there were landslides, rivers changed their routes, villages were affected, bridges collapsed."

The amount of rain that fell on the region, especially its famous tourist destination and hill station Nainital was abnormal, according to the Indian Meteorological Department (IMD).

"This was an unprecedented rain at this time of the year. Normally, the monsoon is retreating at this time and chances of rain are slim, but this amount of rain is unheard of in recent history," Dr. Rajendra Kumar Jenamani of the IMD told Arab News.

Ecologists have been warning for years that the Himalayas are warming at an alarming pace, melting ice trapped in glaciers, elevating the risk of devastating floods and landslides. Nearby populations are vulnerable, as the region’s ecosystem has also become too fragile for construction projects.

Nainital-based journalist and environmental researcher Kavita Upadhyay said the local community has not recorded incidents that had brought devastation as large as that caused by Monday and Tuesday downpours.

"We received more than 500-millimeter rainfall in 24 hours, and this is the maximum in recorded history," she told Arab News. "When we get 60-milimeter rainfall it is called heavy rainfall, imagine the magnitude of 500 millimeters."

Upadhyay blamed unplanned development for the disaster.

"One would hear the word 'climate change' but I am not an expert on that, but what we do know is that extreme weather events have been increasing," she said. "The reason for the disaster is definitely the way development is happening in Uttarakhand. Be it roads, houses or expanding tourism, big infrastructure projects like that. I don’t think authorities have taken into account that extreme weather events will happen."

Delhi-based environmentalist Vimlendu Jha said the extreme weather incidents occurring in Uttarakhand were an indication of a "climate crisis."

"We cannot call it climate change because change is a moderate word. Here we are talking about the climate crisis which is causing extreme rainfall and also a lot of rainfall in a small period of time," he said.

Referring to previous climate-related disasters in the region, Jha said in each case devastation was happening as unplanned development — including of hydroelectric power plants and roads for which thousands of trees had been cut — was causing "nature’s fury."

"The reason why it got scaled up and extreme this time is because of the overall destruction of the local ecology," Jha said. "These are the reason we are witnessing this kind of nature’s fury."