Uber wins challenge against London operating license refusal

Transport for London two years ago rejected Uber’s application for a new license, citing several breaches that placed passengers and their safety at risk. (AFP)
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Updated 28 September 2020

Uber wins challenge against London operating license refusal

  • Uber was allowed to continue operating while the appeal was underway

LONDON: Uber can keep operating in London after the ride-hailing company won a court appeal on Monday against the refusal by transit regulators to renew its license.
The US company had challenged Transport for London’s decision in late 2019 not to renew its private hire vehicle (PHV) operating license over safety concerns involving imposter drivers.
“Despite their historical failings, I find them, now, to be a fit and proper person to hold a London PHV operator’s license,” Deputy Chief Magistrate Tanweek Ikram wrote in his decision.
Uber was allowed to continue operating while the appeal was underway. The decision came after a four-day hearing at Westminster Magistrates’ Court earlier this month.
Transport for London had decided two years ago to reject Uber’s application for a new license, citing several breaches that placed passengers and their safety at risk. The regulator noted, among other things, that unauthorized drivers were able to carry out thousands of rides by uploading their photos to other driver accounts.


US to sue Google in biggest antitrust case in decades

Updated 20 October 2020

US to sue Google in biggest antitrust case in decades

  • The move comes after months of investigations by federal and state antitrust enforcers

WASHINGTON: The US government was preparing to sue Google Tuesday in what would be the biggest antitrust case in decades, media reports said.
The Wall Street Journal and New York Times said the Justice Department suit will accuse the California tech giant of illegal monopoly behavior to preserve its dominance in Internet search and advertising.
The move comes after months of investigations by federal and state antitrust enforcers seeking to check the power of the massive technology firm and parallel probes into other giants such as Amazon, Facebook and Apple.
It was not immediately clear what remedy the government was seeking in the suit, which could take years to resolve. But it could force changes in business practices or break off segments of the Google empire.
The Justice Department had no immediate comment but scheduled a briefing for media later Tuesday. Google did not immediately respond to a request for comment.