What We Are Reading Today: Urban Economics and Fiscal Policy by Holfer Sieg

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Updated 06 August 2020

What We Are Reading Today: Urban Economics and Fiscal Policy by Holfer Sieg

With more than half of today’s global GDP being produced by approximately 400 metropolitan centers, learning about the economics of cities is vital to understanding economic prosperity. 

This textbook introduces graduate and upper-division undergraduate students to the field of urban economics and fiscal policy, relying on a modern approach that integrates theoretical and empirical analysis. Based on material that Holger Sieg has taught at the University of Pennsylvania, Urban Economics and Fiscal Policy brings the most recent insights from the field into the classroom.

Divided into short chapters, the book explores fiscal policies that directly shape economic issues in cities, such as city taxes, the provision of quality education, access to affordable housing, and protection from crime and natural hazards. 

For each issue, Sieg offers questions, facts, and background; illuminates how economic theory helps students engage with topics; and presents empirical data that shows how economic ideas play out in daily life. 

Throughout, the book pushes readers to think critically and immediately put what they are learning to use by applying cutting-edge theory to data.

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What We Are Reading Today: Who Gets In And Why by Jeffrey Selingo

Updated 20 September 2020

What We Are Reading Today: Who Gets In And Why by Jeffrey Selingo

For anyone interested in how decisions are made about admissions to the top-ranked colleges and universities in the US, Jeffrey Selingo’s Who Gets In And Why is for them. 

“Money talks and privilege walks. In the case of college admissions, it saunters through wrought-iron gates, past signs emblazoned with ‘Welcome Class of’ and into seats at convocation,” Anthony Abraham Jack said in a review for The New York Times. 

Timely and engaging, Who Gets in and Why details “how college admission is rigged in favor of the privileged and how it came to be gamed even further,” said the review. 

“Through revealing interviews with industry leaders and observations of admissions committee deliberations at three schools, Selingo unpacks the myriad ways that colleges’ desperate attempts to climb up in the rankings further open doors to students from more affluent families,” the review added. 

“Universities want to raise their profile, knowing that selectivity is a key measure in rankings. They also want to lock in their full payers early, a desire that may only grow stronger as colleges grapple with budget deficits brought upon by COVID-19,” the review said.