Indonesia’s anti-trust watchdog levies $3 million in fines on Grab and partner

Indonesia’s anti-trust watchdog said Grab had discriminated against its drivers, prioritizing those provided by partner PT Teknologi Pengangkutan Indonesia to the Softbank-backed firm. (AFP file photo)
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Updated 03 July 2020

Indonesia’s anti-trust watchdog levies $3 million in fines on Grab and partner

  • Grab infringed the anti-monopoly laws after evaluating the case
  • Grab is Southeast Asia’s most valuable startup with a valuation of $14 billion

JAKARTA: Indonesia’s anti-trust watchdog announced fines totaling more than $3 million for Grab and its business partner after finding it guilty of breaking anti-monopoly laws, a verdict the ride-hailing firm vowed to appeal.
The Business Competition Supervisory Commission (KPPU) said it had found Grab had discriminated against its drivers, prioritizing those provided by partner PT Teknologi Pengangkutan Indonesia (TPI) to the Softbank-backed firm.
In a statement, Dinni Melanie, the chair of the watchdog judicial panel, said it had found Grab infringed the anti-monopoly laws after evaluating the case on Thursday evening.
The agency imposed a fine of $2.1 million on Grab and a penalty of $1.03 million rupiah on TPI.
A spokesman for Grab, which is Southeast Asia’s most valuable startup with a valuation of $14 billion, said the firm would appeal the verdict.
“Grab’s view is that it has not violated any regulation, engaged in any anti-competitive business practices, or injured any third parties,” he said, characterizing the watchdog’s findings as “unsubstantiated allegations.”
Reuters could not immediately reach TPI to seek comment.


German economy to shrink by 5.2% this year, grow by 5.1% next year

Updated 22 September 2020

German economy to shrink by 5.2% this year, grow by 5.1% next year

  • The number of people out of work is seen rising to 2.7 million this year from 2.3 million in 2019
  • The Ifo institute cautioned that there was an unusually high degree of uncertainty attached to the forecasts

BERLIN: Germany’s Ifo institute on Tuesday said Europe’s largest economy would likely shrink by 5.2 percent this year, raising its previous estimate for a 6.7 percent drop, in the latest sign the damage caused by the COVID-19 pandemic could be smaller than initially feared.
“The decline in the second quarter and the recovery are currently developing more favorably than we had expected,” Ifo chief economist Timo Wollmershaeuser said.
For 2021, Ifo cut its economic forecast for Germany to 5.1 percent growth from its previous estimate of 6.4 percent. It expects the economy to expand by 1.7 percent in 2022.
The number of people out of work is seen rising to 2.7 million this year from 2.3 million in 2019, before edging down to 2.6 million in 2021 and then to 2.5 million in 2022.
That would translate into a jump in the unemployment rate to 5.9 percent this year from 5.0 percent last year. The rate would then drop to 5.7 percent percent in 2021 and 5.5 percent in 2022, Ifo said.
The Ifo institute cautioned that there was an unusually high degree of uncertainty attached to the forecasts. It pointed to the rising number of coronavirus infections, the risk of a disorderly Brexit and unresolved trade disputes.