Chile’s LATAM Airlines files for US Chapter 11 bankruptcy protection

LATAM Airlines are the largest air transport services company in Latin America. (File/AFP)
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Updated 26 May 2020

Chile’s LATAM Airlines files for US Chapter 11 bankruptcy protection

  • The company is the largest airline in Latin America
  • LATAM said they have about $1.3 billion in cash on hand

LATAM Airlines Group SA said on Tuesday the company and its affiliates in Chile, Peru, Colombia, Ecuador and US have filed for Chapter 11 bankruptcy protection in the United States, due to a slump in travel worldwide amid the coronavirus crisis.
Latin America’s largest airline said it secured funding from shareholders, including two of its largest the Cueto and Amaro families, and Qatar Airways, to provide up to $900 million in debtor-in-possession financing.
The company said it had about $1.3 billion in cash on hand.
“We have implemented a series of difficult measures to mitigate the impact of this unprecedented industry disruption, but ultimately this path represents the best option,” Chief Executive Officer Roberto Alvo said.
LATAM Airlines Group listed assets and liabilities in the range of $10 billion and $50 billion, according to a filing with the US Bankruptcy Court in Southern District of New York.
The airlines and its affiliates will continue to fly with no impact on passenger or cargo operations and reservations, the company said.
The company said its affiliates in Argentina, Brazil and Paraguay were not included in the Chapter 11 filing.
LATAM Airlines’ Brazilian affiliates are in discussions with the Brazilian government about the next steps and financial support for operations in the country.


Analysts urge Canada to focus on boosting the economy

Updated 06 July 2020

Analysts urge Canada to focus on boosting the economy

  • Canada lost one of its coveted triple-A ratings in June when Fitch downgraded it for the first time

TORONTO: Canada should focus on boosting economic growth after getting pummeled by the COVID-19 crisis, analysts say, even as concerns about the sustainability of its debt are growing, with Fitch downgrading the nation’s rating just over a week ago.

Canadian Finance Minister Bill Morneau will deliver a “fiscal snapshot” on Wednesday that will outline the current balance sheet and may give an idea of the money the government is setting aside for the future.

As the economy recovers, some fiscal support measures, which are expected to boost the budget deficit sharply, could be wound down and replaced by incentives meant to get people back to work and measures to boost economic growth, economists said.

“The only solution to these large deficits is growth, so we need a transition to a pro-growth agenda,” said Craig Wright, chief economist at Royal Bank of Canada. The IMF expects Canada’s economy to contract by 8.4 percent this year. Ottawa is already rolling out more than C$150 billion in direct economic aid, including payments to workers impacted by COVID-19.

Further stimulus measures could include a green growth strategy, as well as spending on infrastructure, including smart infrastructure, economists said. Smart infrastructure makes use of digital technology.

“We have to make sure that government spending is calibrated to the economy of the future rather than the economy of the past,” Wright said.

Canada lost one of its coveted triple-A ratings in June when Fitch downgraded it for the first time, citing the billions of dollars in emergency aid Ottawa has spent to help bridge the downturn caused by COVID-19 shutdowns.

Standard & Poor’s, Moody’s and DBRS still give Canadian debt the highest rating. At DBRS, Michael Heydt, the lead sovereign analyst on Canada, says his concern is about potential structural damage to the economy if the slowdown lingers too long.

Fiscal policymakers “need to be confident that there is a recovery underway before they start talking about (debt) consolidation,” Heydt said.

Fitch expects Canada’s total government debt will rise to 115.1 percent of GDP in 2020 from 88.3 percent in 2019.

Royce Mendes, a senior economist at CIBC Capital Markets, said the economy still needs more support.

“Turning too quickly toward austerity would be a clear mistake,” he said.