Recalled Hafeez aims for T20 World Cup before retiring

Pakistan cricket captain Mohammad Hafeez celebrates the dismissal of Australian cricketer David Warner (unseen) during the ICC Twenty20 Cricket World Cup's Super Eight match between Australia and Pakistan at the R. Premadasa International Cricket Stadium in Colombo on October 2, 2012. (AFP)
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Updated 17 January 2020

Recalled Hafeez aims for T20 World Cup before retiring

  • 39-year-old allrounder believed he could groom youngsters in the team
  • Hafeez will be playing only as a batsman

ISLAMABAD: Pakistan all-rounder Mohammad Hafeez regards the home series against Bangladesh next week as an audition for the Twenty20 World Cup squad before he exits international cricket.
Hafeez was recalled for the three T20s in Lahore starting next Friday after playing his last T20 in 2018 against New Zealand. He was named man of that series but the selectors ignored him last year during which No. 1-ranked Pakistan lost eight of its nine completed T20s.
“My personal plan is that I should play for Pakistan on the basis of fitness and performance,” Hafeez said on Friday. “I want to play the World Twenty20 and then I want to make an exit from international cricket.”
The T20 World Cup is in October in Australia.
The 39-year-old allrounder expected his recall and believed he could groom youngsters in the team.
“Well, (selection was) not a surprise to me to be honest because I’m always available for the team,” he said. “There are more youngsters than seniors (in the team) so it will be great for us to share the experience with them and let them express themselves in a way so they can perform and do well for a long period of time.”
Hafeez will be playing only as a batsman against Bangladesh after his bowling action in August in England was reported and he was suspended from bowling in England last week. Hafeez said he will miss bowling his offspin, which has earned him 54 wickets in 89 T20s for Pakistan.
“I’m ready to retest again and I am waiting for it,” Hafeez said. “Hopefully it will be done soon.”
Hafeez has also played 55 tests and 218 one-day internationals since 2003.


Mercedes F1 team helps to develop breathing aid in pandemic

Updated 30 March 2020

Mercedes F1 team helps to develop breathing aid in pandemic

  • New breathing aid similar to those used in Italy, China to fight coronavirus symptoms
  • Lack of ventilators a major concern as coronavirus cases increase

LONDON: Formula One team Mercedes has helped to develop a breathing aid that could keep coronavirus patients out of intensive care and ease some pressure on Britain’s strained health service.
As part of a combined effort involving seven Britain-based teams, Mercedes worked with engineers at the University College London and clinicians at University College London Hospital to adapt and improve a device that bridges the gap between an oxygen mask and the need for full ventilation.
The device, known as continuous positive airway pressure, has been used extensively in hospitals in Italy and China to deliver oxygen to the lungs of coronavirus patients during the pandemic.
UCL said the adapted devices have been recommended for use in Britain and that 100 of them are being sent to its hospital for clinical trials. There is the potential for quick roll-out by Mercedes to hospitals across the country.
Tim Baker, a professor from UCL’s department of mechanical engineering, said clinicians called on the “capability of Formula One” to reduce a process “that could take years down to a matter of days,” with the adapted device taking less than 100 hours to develop from an initial meeting.
“We have been proud to put our resources at the service of UCL,” said Andy Cowell, managing director of Mercedes, “to deliver the CPAP project to the highest standards and in the fastest possible time frame.”
The technology arms of six other teams — Red Bull, Haas, McLaren, Renault, Williams and Racing Point — contributed to the developing of the CPAP devices, as part of what F1 has labeled “Project Pitlane.”
The teams say they will continue to pool their resources and “support in other areas requiring rapid, innovative technology responses to the unique challenges posed” by the pandemic.
The CPAP machines work by pushing a mix of oxygen and air into the mouth and nose at a continuous rate, helping to increase the amount of oxygen entering the lungs. They are used routinely by Britain’s National Health Service but are in short supply currently.
There have been almost 20,000 confirmed cases of COVID-19 in Britain, with more than 1,200 deaths.
For most people, the new virus causes mild or moderate symptoms, such as fever and cough that clear up in two to three weeks. For some, especially older adults and people with existing health problems, it can cause more severe illness, including pneumonia and death.
The F1 season has yet to start, with the first eight races of the schedule having been postponed or canceled. It means there will be no racing until the middle of June at the earliest.
Mercedes is the leading team in F1, with defending champion Lewis Hamilton as its top driver.