Balochistan: Trucks captured with 46,000 liters of smuggled Iranian oil

A boy sits next to plastic canisters filled with petrol brought from Iran, while waiting for customers at a roadside petrol station on the outskirts of Quetta, Pakistan Feb 13, 2019. (REUTERS/ File photo)
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Updated 18 December 2019

Balochistan: Trucks captured with 46,000 liters of smuggled Iranian oil

  • Fuel smuggled from Iran is cheaper than the oil sold at gas stations in Pakistan
  • Last week, 15 people died when a truck with Iranian oil collided with a bus in Balochistan

ISLAMABAD: Pakistan has seized five trucks carrying smuggled diesel from Iran, officials said on Wednesday.

The Pakistan Coast Guards (PCG) said in a statement that 46,250 liters of diesel were recovered from the Mazda trucks at the Naka Khari check post on the RCD Highway, near Windar in Balochistan province.

Besides oil, other contraband items were confiscated from the trucks. “PCG officials seized contraband items, 2,980 kilograms of betel nut, 560 packets of Indian gutka, 385 packets of naswar and 33 tires of different of vehicles,” the statement read.

The approximate value of all intercepted goods is Rs33.3 million, the PGC said.

Fuel smuggled from Iran is cheaper than the oil sold at gas stations in Pakistan.

While the authorities have been long struggling to stop illegal sales of smuggled fuel, it remains available, especially in Balochistan which borders with Iran.

Amid a crackdown on fuel smugglers, at least 15 people were killed when a truck carrying illegal Iranian oil collided with a passenger bus in Balochistan on Dec. 13.


Nepalese climbers bag mountaineering’s last great prize: winter ascent of Pakistan’s K2

Updated 27 min 41 sec ago

Nepalese climbers bag mountaineering’s last great prize: winter ascent of Pakistan’s K2

  • One of the ten Nepalese mountaineers performed the feat without using an oxygen cylinder
  • K2 earned the nickname of ‘savage mountain’ since a large number of climbers lost their lives while trying to scale it

ISLAMABAD: A group of Nepalese climbers made history on Saturday by summiting the world’s second tallest mountain, K2, in winter, according to its team leader who made the announcement on Facebook only minutes after making the accomplishment. 

“The Karakorum’s ‘Savage Mountain’ has been summited in the most dangerous season: WINTER,” Chhang Dawa Sherpa exclaimed in his social media post.

His announcement was also confirmed by an official of the Alpine Club of Pakistan which deals with mountaineering expeditions in the country.

At 8,611 meters, K2 was the only peak among the 14 “8000ers” located in the Karakorum and Himalayan mountain ranges that remained unconquered during winter. 

Along the icy glaciers of the Karakoram, mountaineers and locals speak about K2 summits with a hushed reverence, and folklore in the area is rife with mythical stories of the mountain “permitting” climbers to reach its top — considered the ultimate honor granted to a mortal by nature. 

When a climb doesn't go as planned, locals tell each other the mountain refused to be scaled. 

“The Nepalese climbers finally reached the summit of Mt. K2 … this afternoon at 17:00 local time,” Dawa wrote. “This is the first winter ascent of the 2nd highest mountain in the world and the ONLY eight-thousander (8000er) to be climbed in winter. This is a greatest achievement in the history of mountaineering, this is a good example of team work … ‘If a mountain lets you climb it, no one can stop you.’” 

One of the ten Nepalese climbers, Mingma G, also became the first mountaineer to summit the peak in winter without an oxygen cylinder.

K2 earned the nickname of “savage mountain” since a large number of climbers — 86 in all — lost their lives while trying to scale it. 

In 2008, 11 climbers from an international expedition died in what was considered as the single worst accident in the history of mountaineering. 

K2 straddles the Pakistan-China border. While it is about two-and-a-half football fields shorter than Everest (8,848 meters), it is widely considered to be the toughest and most dangerous mountain to climb. 

More than 300 climbers have scaled K2 in spring and summer. Italians Achille Compagnoni and Lino Lacedelli were the first to reach its summit in the summer of 1954.