Bono, U2 play their first-ever concert in India

Mumbai is the last leg on The Joshua Tree Tour 2019 — named after the Irish band U2’s seminal album. (AFP)
Updated 16 December 2019

Bono, U2 play their first-ever concert in India

  • U2 are the latest in a series of major international acts to tour the South Asian country
  • Mumbai is the last leg on The Joshua Tree Tour 2019, named after the band’s seminal album

MUMBAI: Irish rockers U2 played their first-ever concert in India Sunday, with top celebrities and mega-fans converging from across the vast nation to the coastal city of Mumbai.
U2 are the latest in a series of major international acts to tour the South Asian country, with Beyonce, Shakira, Coldplay, Demi Lovato and Bryan Adams among the superstars who have played to packed venues.
Some 35,000 tickets were estimated to have been sold for the concert at the D.Y. Patil Sports Stadium, local media reported, with top Bollywood stars posing for photos before entering the venue.
Ahead of the concert, the band posted on their social media accounts a photo of the words “Ahimsa is the highest ideal.”
“We were shaped and formed by Martin Luther King Jr who was a student of Mahatma Gandhi,” frontman Bono told the NDTV news television channel in September.
“So we come as students to the source of inspiration that is ‘Ahimsa’ — non-violence. Indians gave us this. It is the greatest gift to the world.”
Mumbai is the last leg on The Joshua Tree Tour 2019 — named after the band’s seminal album — which kicked off on November 8 in Auckland.
The Asia Pacific tour, which first started with stadium concerts in North America and Europe in 2017, marks three decades since the Irish group’s “The Joshua Tree” was released.
Released in March 1987, “The Joshua Tree” reached into the roots of Irish and American music and produced classic hits “With or Without You,” “Where the Streets Have No Name” and “I Still Haven’t Found What I’m Looking For.”


Skeptic of world being round dies in California rocket crash

Updated 24 February 2020

Skeptic of world being round dies in California rocket crash

  • “Mad” Mike Hughes said he wanted to fly to the edge of outer space to see if the world is round
  • His home-built rocket blasted off into the desert sky and plunged back to earth in California

BARSTOW, California: A California man who said he wanted to fly to the edge of outer space to see if the world is round has died after his home-built rocket blasted off into the desert sky and plunged back to earth.
“Mad” Mike Hughes was killed on Saturday afternoon after his rocket crashed on private property near Barstow, California.
Waldo Stakes, a colleague who was at the rocket launch, said Hughes, 64, was killed.

"Mad" Mike Hughes. (Science Channel/via REUTERS/File photo)
 


The Science Channel said on Twitter it had been chronicling Hughes’ journey and that “thoughts & prayers go out to his family & friends during this difficult time.”
“It was always his dream to do this launch,” the Twitter message said.
Hughes also was a limousine driver, who held the Guinness world record for “longest limousine ramp jump,” for jumping 103 feet (31 meters) in a Lincoln Town Car stretch limousine, at a speedway in 2002.
A video on TMZ.com showed the rocket taking off, with what appears to be a parachute tearing off during the launch. The steam-powered rocket streaks upward, then takes around 10 seconds to fall straight back to earth. Shrieks can be heard as the rocket plows into the desert.

Freelance journalist Justin Chapman, who was at the scene, said the rocket appeared to rub against the launch apparatus, which might have caused the mishap with the parachute.
In March 2018, Hughes propelled himself about 1,875 feet (570 meters) into the air. He deployed one parachute and then a second one but still had a hard landing in the Mojave Desert in California, and injured his back.
“This thing wants to kill you 10 different ways,” Hughes said after that launch. “This thing will kill you in a heartbeat.”
He said in a video that his goal was to eventually fly to the edge of outer space to determine for himself whether the world is round.
“I don’t want to take anyone else’s word for it,” he said in the video, posted on the BBC News website. “I don’t know if the world is flat or round.”
In another video posted on his YouTube site, Hughes said he also wanted “to convince people they can do things that are extraordinary with their lives.”
“My story really is incredible,” Hughes once told The Associated Press. “It’s got a bunch of story lines — the garage-built thing. I’m an older guy. It’s out in the middle of nowhere, plus the Flat Earth. The problem is it brings out all the nuts also.”