New Sharqiya Baja to take place Thursday

Mishal Alghuneim has the motorcycle honors in the bag. (Photo/Supplied)
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Updated 12 December 2019

New Sharqiya Baja to take place Thursday

ALKHOBAR: The new Sharqiya Baja 2019, the fifth and final round of the inaugural Saudi Toyota Desert Rally Championship, will take place at 3:15 p.m. on Thursday with a timed super special stage of 4.32 km. 

Ahead of a field of 51 cars, nine NUTVs, 10 motorcycles, 23 quads and one truck will be two further days of competitive action through the deserts of the Eastern Province and 474.86 competitive kilometers in a compact route of 746.58 km. 

 Several international drivers, most notably Spaniard Carlos Sainz, Zimbabwe’s Conrad Rautenbach, Abu Dhabi Racing’s Sheikh Khalid Al-Qassimi and Czech Miroslav Zapletal will use the opportunity to finalize their preparations for January’s Dakar Rally.

In contrast, the massive Saudi contingent is spread across several categories and sporting disciplines, and the series finale will decide the outcome of the drivers’ championship and the winner of the quad section.

 Saudi Arabia’s leading drivers, Yazeed Al-Rajhi (Toyota Hilux) and Yasir Seaidan (X-raid Buggy), have fought a fascinating tussle for supremacy in the new series.

 Seaidan won the Aseer Rally opener and finished behind his rival at the Qassim Rally, the AlUla-Neom event and the Riyadh Rally. 

 The pair are now separated by just three points, heading into the showdown on Half Moon Bay.

An outright victory would give either driver the title, with 25 points awarded to the winner, 18 for second place and 15 for third. The two drivers, however, face strong opposition from a plethora of Saudi rivals. 

 ED Racing’s Essa Al-Dossari is a distant third in the series in his Nissan Navara, and can confirm that position by staying ahead of Mutair Al-Shammeri, Khalid Al-Feraihi and Faris Al-Shammeri. 

 Salman Al-Shammeri has already clinched the T2 title by scoring maximum points in the category for series production cross-country vehicles in three of the four rallies. His closest challenger is Yousef Al-Suwaidi, winner of the T2 in the Qassim Rally.

 Saleh Al-Saif confirmed success in the T3 before the recent event in Riyadh, and tackled that rally in the NUTV class, while Ibrahim Al-Muhanna, Osama Al-Sanad and Raed Abo Theeb have cruised to the T4 title in a Mercedes truck. 

Yousef Al-Dhaif has an unassailable lead over Fahad Al-Naim and Khalil and Majid Al-Tuwaijri in the NUTV Championship, but the latter trio will be battling to finish as runners-up in the popular category. Motorcycle honors have already gone to Mishal Alghuneim with Abdullah Al-Helal finishing the series in second place, but a host of riders still have a shot at claiming third overall.

Abdulmajeed Al-Khulaifi won the quad section at the Qassim and AlUla-Neom rallies, but a retirement in Riyadh has left the door open for Riyadh Al-Oraifan to snatch the title in the Eastern Province. He trails his fellow Yamaha rider by 21 points, with 25 available for the outright win.

 Several riders can still finish third, but Abdul Aziz Al-Shayban heads into the ceremonial start on Half Moon Bay leading Riyadh event-winner Sufiyan Al-Omar by six points. 

The event is organized by the Saudi Automobile and Motorcycle Federation (SAMF), under the chairmanship of Prince Khalid bin Sultan Al-Abdullah Al-Faisal and the supervision of former FIA Middle East champion Abdullah Bakhashab. 

 The new Baja runs with the support of the SAMF, the General Sports Authority, Abdul Latif Jameel Motors (Toyota), the MBC Group, Al-Arabia Outdoors and the Saudi Research and Marketing Group.

 The event is being considered as an official candidate for future inclusion in the FIA World Cup for Cross-Country Bajas.


A spot in Al-Taawoun club history is just the start for Mitch Duke

Updated 27 October 2020

A spot in Al-Taawoun club history is just the start for Mitch Duke

  • After earning his new club its first-ever spot in the AFC Champion’s League knockout stages, Mitch Duke is looking forward the rest of the season

LONDON: Mitch Duke has only been in Saudi Arabia since August but has already made history. His new club, Al-Taawoun, needed a win against Qatari side Al-Duhail in the final game of the AFC Champions League group stage last month to progress to the knockout phase for the first time ever — and the Australian striker headed home the only goal of the game with four minutes remaining.

It was not only a clear illustration of the 29-year-old’s ability, but the fact that he still managed to have such a decisive effect on the game despite sporting a heavily-bandaged head after an earlier clash revealed a never-say-die spirit that will serve his new team well.

“It was a good way to announce myself, and to play in the AFC Champions League was awesome, especially to play in the western zone for the first time,” said Duke. “We went into that tournament on the back of seven losses in a row and we did well to get to the final 16 for the first time in our history.”

Such fighting spirit was also in evidence last week during the second round of games in the new Saudi Pro League season. During their clash with 2019 champions and 2020 runners-up Al-Nassr, Al-Taawoun midfielder Ryan Al-Mousa was sent off after just 10 minutes. Despite this, they emerged with a 1-0 victory against one of the main title contenders.

“To get a result against Al-Nassr with 10 men from 10 minutes is massive and shows what we are capable of,” said Duke.

It was a very welcome victory for a team that finished third in 2019 but found themselves battling relegation last season, eventually finishing in 12th place, just three points clear of the drop zone.

“(Last season) was a stressful time, with COVID, and they were going downhill,” said Duke. “I was here for the last few games but I couldn’t play so I had to sit in the stands and hope they didn’t lose so I wouldn’t be playing in the second division.”

It remains to be seen how Al-Taawoun will fare in the new campaign. Going from near bottom to the top of the league in a single season is a big ask but there is no shortage of ambition at the club.

“There is always an outside chance of the title but with the big three teams and the investment they have made in their squads, it is going to be difficult,” said Duke. “Qualifying for the AFC Champions League is a realistic target.”

Duke, who spent four years playing in Japan with Shimizu S-Pulse, from 2015 to 2018, moved to Saudi Arabia from Western Sydney Wanderers. Not only was he the top striker at his hometown club (who were, as Al-Hilal fans will remember, the 2014 AFC Champions League winners) but also the captain, so his departure was much lamented at home. He is in no doubt, however, that he made the right choice.

“There were a few factors involved in the decision to move,” he said. “There is the financial side of things, as well as making sure that the football is decent. I think Saudi Arabia is the second-best league in Asia, after Japan.

“It is a great test for me, and there are seven foreigners in every team and they bring in some very good players. There is some real quality in the league and they invest in it.”

The growing number of Australian players in the league also makes a difference. They include some big names, such as Rhys Williams at Al-Qadisiyah, Brad Jones at Al-Nassr, Craig Goodwin at Abha and Al-Wehda’s Dmitri Petratos. As a result, Socceroos coach Graham Arnold is well aware of what is happening in the league, which could boost Duke’s chance of an international call-up when 2022 World Cup qualifiers resume next year.

“I hope that is the case,” said Duke. “The best thing is to keep playing well for Al-Taawoun and then we will wait and see what happens. As a forward here, I am playing against quality defenders and vice versa. There are also plenty of Saudi national team players in the league, which means that the level is good.”

The lifestyle in a new city and country is taking a little getting used to, he admitted. It has been quite a change and Duke, whose pregnant wife and young son are still living in Australia, is learning to deal with having plenty of free time on his hands, especially as training and games take place in the evenings. He sees this time as a valuable opportunity, however, and is determined make good use of it.

“I have decided to do some studies and prepare for a life after football, do some coaching licenses.” he said. “I have plenty of time on my hands and, mentally, you can go into a bit of a hole with being away from the family and that can creep into your football, so I am to start studying. There is no excuse. I want to use my time here to improve.”

He has already shown that during his time in Saudi Arabia he can also help Al-Taawoun to do the same.