Reggae star Koffee keen to perform in UAE again

Koffee. (originalkoffee.com)
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Updated 09 December 2019

Reggae star Koffee keen to perform in UAE again

  • “Oh yeah! I would come back here to live, what do you mean!”

DUBAI: Jamaican artist Koffee has said she would love to perform in the UAE again after being mesmerized by Dubai.

The 19-year-old singer, who has been making waves with her reggae sounds internationally, belted out her top hits during the city’s annual urban festival, Sole DXB, and during her stay toured iconic landmarks including the Burj Khalifa skyscraper and Dubai mall.

Asked if she would return to the UAE for another performance, Koffee said: “Oh yeah! I would come back here to live, what do you mean!

“I’m happy that I got to spend a few days and see the place and enjoy the scenery a bit before the show. I don’t get to do that often, so this was special for me,” she told Arab News.

The rising young star, whose real name is Mikayla Simpson, prefers to be known by her stage name gained from high-school friends after drinking coffee on a hot summer’s day.

She brought her reggae melodies to Dubai for the first time to link in with Sole DXB’s Jamaican theme.

“Jamaican culture is very strong, very unique. It is a unified culture in terms of we all kind of like to get along. It is a very down-to-earth and irie (Jamaican term for all is good and at peace) culture,” she added.

Koffee, who was performing at the festival alongside her idol Protoje, had also been looking forward to being the opening act for one of her favorite artist’s Burna Boy, until the Nigerian singer cancelled his performance on the day.

However, Burna Boy’s cancellation gave Koffee, who described herself as a “sing-jay-guitarist,” to be the headline act on Friday. Hundreds of concertgoers sang along to her top hits “Toast,” “Rapture” and latest single “W.”

Koffee set the crowd ablaze when she returned to the stage for a final performance with her cover of Burna Boy’s hit “Ye.”

The teenager shot to fame after Jamaican Olympic athlete Usain Bolt shared her YouTube recording of a tribute to him called “Legend,” in 2017.

Since then she has been described as an artist who has modernized reggae. “I bring a newness to the genre … a new reggae awakening.”

Koffee, who said her music was inspired by her experiences, added that she felt “proud” to bring the genre to a new generation.

“Reggae is a very positive genre, it is surrounded by positive words, lyrics, people and it is known for that. I’m proud to use my talent to bring positive attention toward my country, that’s definitely good for me.”
 

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  • Schaub argues that to understand racism we must look at historical episodes of collective discrimination

Racial divisions have returned to the forefront of politics in the US and European societies, making it more important than ever to understand race and racism. 

But do we? In this original and provocative book, acclaimed historian Jean-Frédéric Schaub shows that we don’t— and that we need to rethink the widespread assumption that racism is essentially a modern form of discrimination based on skin color and other visible differences.

On the contrary, Schaub argues that to understand racism we must look at historical episodes of collective discrimination. Built around notions of identity and otherness, race is above all a political tool that must be understood in the context of its historical origins.

Although scholars agree that races don’t exist, they disagree about when these ideologies emerged. Drawing on historical research from the early modern period to today, Schaub makes the case that the key turning point in the political history of race in the West occurred not with the Atlantic slave trade and American slavery, as many historians have argued, but much earlier, in 15th-century Spain and Portugal, with the racialization of Christians of Jewish and Muslim origin.