Pakistani-American journalist to moderate US presidential debate

mna Nawaz of PBS Newshour speaks during the PBS segment of the Summer 2019 Television Critics Association Press Tour 2019 at The Beverly Hilton Hotel on July 29, 2019 in Beverly Hills, California. (AFP/File)
Updated 08 December 2019

Pakistani-American journalist to moderate US presidential debate

  • Nawaz will be co-hosting the program with a PBS veteran on December 19
  • Won the Peabody Award for her story on the global plastic problem earlier this year

ISLAMABAD: Another member of the Pakistani diaspora in the US made history with journalist Amna Nawaz becoming the first South Asian American to moderate the US presidential debate on December 19.
Nawaz will be co-moderating the process with PBS NewsHour anchor and managing editor, Judy Woodruff, at the Loyola Marymount University in Los Angeles, California.
Sara Just, executive producer of PBS NewsHour, made the announcement on November 27.
Woodruff will lead the panel which includes Politico’s chief political correspondent, Tim Alberta, and PBS NewsHour White House correspondent, Yamiche Alcindor.




Amna Nawaz is the first South Asian American journalist to be selected to moderate a US presidential debate. 17th August, 2019. (Enoch Chan, Amna Nawaz Instagram)

Nawaz, 40, who is originally from the state of Virginia, has a decorated and impressive career as a journalist. She is the senior national correspondent and primary substitute anchor on PBS NewsHour, and has been with the organization since April 2018.
Earlier this year, she won the Peabody Award for her reporting on the global plastic problem which NewsHour ran as a series.
Prior to joining NewsHour, Nawaz worked as an anchor and correspondent with ABC News.
Her beat covers politics, foreign affairs, education, climate change, culture and sports.
At ABC, Nawaz covered the 2016 US presidential elections, and has reported on President Donald Trump’s immigration policies.
She’s also the founder and the former managing editor of NBC’s Asian American platform.
On being an Asian American voice from the largest growing population in the USA, and being the first of many things Nawaz told Jade Magazine.com “I’ve had people make assumptions about me – because I’m a woman, because I’m Asian, because my family’s from Pakistan, because I’m Muslim – but I can’t control what others think. All I can do is bring my whole self to this job, to report the stories as I see them, and try to treat others’ stories with the same care and respect I’d want someone to treat mine.”


Ready to mentor Saudi cricketers on the kingdom’s request — Shahid Afridi

Updated 51 min 49 sec ago

Ready to mentor Saudi cricketers on the kingdom’s request — Shahid Afridi

  • Says cricket would be hugely popular in Saudi Arabia given that it is home to millions of Pakistani expats
  • Pakistani minister said this week Islamabad working on “practical steps” to promote cricket in Saudi Arabia 

KARACHI: Pakistani all-rounder and former skipper Shahid Khan Afridi has said he is ready to mentor Saudi cricketers if the kingdom seeks his help.
The comments come in the wake of a meeting between the ambassador of Saudi Arabia to Pakistan, Nawaf bin Said Al-Malki, and Pakistan’s Minister for Inter-Provincial Coordination, Dr. Fehmida Mirza, this month in which they discussed cooperation in the field of sports, with a focus on cricket.
“If I get a request [to train Saudi cricketers] I will definitely go as this is our own county and the people are our own,” Afridi said in an interview with Arab News at his home in Karachi this week.
The 40-year-old cricketer, fondly known as Boom Boom, captained the national team between 2009 and 2011, before retiring from international cricket in 2017. He is well-known for his philanthropic work across Pakistan and has formerly worked with UNICEF and a number of national organizations.
“I have been to Saudi Arabia previously,” he said, detailing his many trips to the Kingdom. “In my opinion there should be cricket [in Saudi Arabia]. There is our [Pakistani] community, which also likes to play cricket,” he said, referring to three million Pakistani expats who reside in the kingdom.
Pakistani minister Mirza said this week that Pakistan was working on “practical steps” to collaborate with Saudi Arabia to promote sports in the Kingdom, particularly cricket.
“I believe in sports diplomacy,” Mirza told Arab News in an interview on Monday. “The matter [of cooperation in cricket] has been taken with Ehsan Mani, chairman, Pakistan Cricket Board. We are working on practical steps to collaborate in promotion of sports, especially cricket.”
According to a statement issued by Mirza’s office, during her meeting with the Saudi ambassador last week, he said cricket was becoming popular in Saudi Arabia because of the Pakistan cricket team, which had a following in the country.
“We want to utilize Pakistan’s rich experience in the field of cricket and promote it in Saudi Arabia,” Al-Malki was quoted in the statement as saying.