‘My Skills Create My Future’ project promotes female empowerment in Kingdom

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British Ambassador Simon Collis, KSU Rector Badran Al Omar & Amanda Ingram, Deputy Director British Council handing over certificate to a participant. (Supplied)
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Group photo: British Ambassador Simon Collis (Sitting right), KSU Rector Badran Al Omar (Center) with students and trainers. (Supplied)
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British Ambassador Simon Collis receiving an art work made by a KSU student. (Supplied)
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A student presenting art work to British Ambassador Simon Collis. (Supplied)
Updated 08 November 2019

‘My Skills Create My Future’ project promotes female empowerment in Kingdom

RIYADH: More than 120 female students from King Saud University in Riyadh participated in the first edition of the “My Skills Create My Future” project, which finished on Thursday.

The project was a collaboration between the British Embassy, the British Council and the university, and aimed to help train the students for the job market through a four-day series of workshops on communication, public speaking and negotiation run by trainers from the UK.

The British Ambassador to Saudi Arabia Simon Collis said the project supports the goals of Saudi Vision 2030 to realize the full potential of the Kingdom’s younger generation. The UK is one of Saudi Arabia’s strategic partners for the delivery of Vision 2030.

“Empowerment of women and girls is a UK priority and over the last few years the Embassy project team has worked with many local organizations to deliver projects to support our common gender-equality goals,” he said.

“A country’s vision can only be realized through its people,” he continued. “The ‘My Skills Create My Future’ project supports Vision 2030’s goal of investing in training to realize the full potential of the next generation of professionals so they are better prepared to contribute to their country’s future and economy.”

KSU Rector Badran Al-Omar said the workshops were conducted “in line with Vision 2030 and the guidelines of the leadership: King Salman, Crown Prince Mohammed bin Salman and the Ministry of Education to empower the women of our country.”

“These workshops were intended to help students develop skills required for today’s workplace,” he continued. “We hope this workshop was beneficial to our KSU female students and will help them with their future careers.

“KSU will continue to work toward developing female talents because they are the future of our Kingdom,” Al-Omar said.

Amanda Ingram, deputy director of the British Council in Saudi Arabia, said, “Investing in education and training is vital to support the transformation that the Kingdom is currently undergoing, particularly in equipping young graduates for the jobs of the future. This pilot project is very much focused on increasing women’s confidence, changing attitudes, and empowering and inspiring women to apply newly acquired skills and knowledge to succeed in the workplace and beyond.

“An inclusive society means increased opportunity for women and young people to play an active and positive role in their communities, and this project represents our vision and commitment on female empowerment,” she continued. “Through the project, we hope all students take away that you don’t just acquire and learn these lifelong skills but continue to hone, utilize and build on them in different aspects of your life.”

Speaking to Arab News, Alaa Shaikh, who is pursuing a master’s in biochemistry from KSU and participated in the training, said, “I am very thankful to the British embassy and the council for choosing to host this workshop at KSU. I thank the KSU rector and all who contributed to this project. Before attending this workshop, there was a hesitation in us, and we had professional weaknesses and needed to overcome them.

“Throughout this intensive workshop we learned how to overcome them for our professional growth and personal development by developing soft skills,” she said. “Trainers at the workshop really helped us to understand what exactly the needs of the market are, and we have realized that there is a chance of greater development to reach Vision 2030.”


Worshippers flock to reopened Prophet’s Mosque for Friday prayers

Updated 06 June 2020

Worshippers flock to reopened Prophet’s Mosque for Friday prayers

MADINAH: Hundreds of thousands of worshippers attended the first Friday prayers to be held at the Prophet’s Mosque in Madinah since the gatherings were suspended to stop the spread of the coronavirus disease (COVID-19) outbreak.

The green light for the resumption of the prayer meetings came as part of a plan to gradually reopen the Kingdom’s mosques while ensuring worshippers and visitors adhered to preventive measures.

A ban on access to the Rawdah remained in place and only groups of worshippers numbering up to a maximum of 40 percent of the mosque’s capacity were being allowed entry.

Precautionary measures also included the allocation of specific doors for the entry of worshippers, the installation of thermal cameras, removal of all carpets so that prayers could be performed on the marble, sanitization of the mosque’s floors and courtyards, periodic opening of domes and canopies to ventilate the mosque, and the removal of Zamzam water containers.

The Prophet’s Mosque in Madinah will be closed after evening prayers and reopened one hour before dawn prayers. Parking lots will operate at 50 percent capacity and a media awareness campaign has been launched to highlight safety procedures at the holy site.

Medical teams have also been stationed at the main entrances to the mosque in cooperation with the Ministry of Health.

Elsewhere in the Kingdom, worshippers also flocked to perform Friday prayers at mosques amid strict health measures.

On May 31, Saudi authorities reopened all mosques for prayers, except in Makkah, as part of the Kingdom’s plan for a gradual return to normal life.

Last week the minister of Islamic affairs, dawah and guidance said that the country’s mosques were ready to welcome back worshippers, following his field trips to check that necessary preparations had been made.

All worshippers must still maintain a distance of 2 meters between rows, wear masks to enter a mosque, and Friday sermons and prayers have been limited to a maximum of 15 minutes.

 

 

 

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