What We Are Reading Today: Free for Life by Christopher Lee Maher

Updated 17 October 2019

What We Are Reading Today: Free for Life by Christopher Lee Maher

Unresolved physical, spiritual, mental and emotional stress, tension, and structural distortion rob people of their ability to do what they truly love. The majority of the available tools designed to help you manage your complex stressors are a distraction from the underlying road blocks that keep your body from healing itself. There is a much better way to rebalance and restore your health so you can resume doing all the things that bring you joy, peace and happiness.

The intense complex stressors  Christopher Lee Maher experienced as a child and as a Navy SEAL inspired him to embody, study and develop powerful systems that create instantaneous, permanent change at a conscious, unconscious and subconscious level.

He introduces his remarkable wellness program in Free for Life. His True Body Intelligence system is a suite of  subtractive methodologies specifically designed to restore balance to the emotions, body, brain, and nervous system, according to a review published on goodreads.com.

The systems within True Body Intelligence assist in reintegrating every aspect of your being to offer real, permanent solutions for root causes, not bandages for symptoms.


What We Are Reading Today: The Seine: The River That Made Paris by Elaine Sciolino

Updated 09 November 2019

What We Are Reading Today: The Seine: The River That Made Paris by Elaine Sciolino

The Seine: The River That Made Paris is a wonderful book from Elaine Sciolino that takes readers on a journey along the Seine river, through France’s fascinating history and a thousand little anecdotes that fill it with life. 

The book “tells the story of the Seine’s origin, its little known source in Burgundy, and the goddess that gave the river its name,” said a review in goodreads.com. 

It also “tells the stories of dozens of fascinating characters that have spent their lives on, around and along the river,” the review added.

It said “Sciolino met with people living on their boats, fishermen, the river police, the firefighters who put out the fire in the Notre Dame Cathedral using water from the Seine, and many more.” 

The characters “come to live with her skillful writing and share their stories of how the Seine has shaped their lives,” said the review.

Sciolino is a writer and former Paris Bureau Chief for The New York Times, based in France since 2002. 

She contributes to The New York Times’ Food, Culture, Styles and Sunday Review sections.