Kuwait ruler Emir Sheikh Sabah returns home after US hospital visit

Sheikh Sabah has ruled the US ally and OPEC oil producer since 2006 and steered its foreign policy for more than 50 years. (File/AFP)
Updated 16 October 2019

Kuwait ruler Emir Sheikh Sabah returns home after US hospital visit

DUBAI: Kuwait’s 90-year-old ruler Emir Sheikh Sabah Al-Ahmad Al-Sabah returned home on Wednesday after hospital treatment in the United States, state news agency KUNA said.
Sheikh Sabah has ruled the US ally and OPEC oil producer since 2006 and steered its foreign policy for more than 50 years.
The emir’s office said in August that Sheikh Sabah had suffered a health setback while in Kuwait, without providing details. He then traveled to the United States for a meeting with US President Donald Trump which was canceled when he was admitted to hospital.

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Jordanian charged with ‘terror’ over tourist stabbings

Updated 26 January 2020

Jordanian charged with ‘terror’ over tourist stabbings

  • The suspect, Moustafa Abourouis, 22, faces up to 20 years in prison
  • Prosecutors accused Abourouis of committing a “terrorist act” and “promoting the ideas of a terrorist group”

AMMAN: A Jordanian court on Sunday levelled “terrorism” charges against a man suspected of wounding eight people in a November knife attack at a popular tourist site.
The suspect, Moustafa Abourouis, 22, faces up to 20 years in prison after the stabbing of three Mexicans, a Swiss woman, a Jordanian tour guide and a security officer at the Roman city of Jerash.
At a hearing open to the press, prosecutors accused Abourouis of committing a “terrorist act” and “promoting the ideas of a terrorist group” — a reference to the Daesh group.
Abourouis, who is of Palestinian origins and grew up in the refugee camp of Souf, was arrested immediately after the attack at Jerash, close to the camp and around 50 kilometers (30 miles) north of Amman.
The Jordanian prosecutor accused Abourouis of trying to join Daesh, an operative of which in Syria had “ordered him to commit attacks against foreigners.”
Two alleged accomplices, also Jordanians of Palestinian origin, were charged with “terrorism” in the same case. All three pleaded not guilty.
The court is scheduled to hear witnesses next Sunday, with the date for a verdict to be confirmed.
It was not the first time a Jordanian tourist attraction has been attacked.
In December 2016, in Karak, home to one of the region’s biggest Crusader castles, 10 people — seven police, two Jordanian civilians and a Canadian tourist — were killed in an attack that also left 30 wounded.
That attack was claimed by Daesh and 10 people were later convicted of carrying out the assault, two of them sentenced to death.
Tourism is a key lifeline for Jordan, a country lacking in natural resources and reliant on foreign aid. The sector accounted for 14 percent of GDP in 2019.
The kingdom, bordering conflict-torn Syria and Iraq, has been working to revive its tourism industry and aims to attract seven million holidaymakers a year.