Lebanon says Israel sent drone over Hezbollah area

A banner depicting Hezbollah leader Sayyed Hassan Nasrallah and an United Nation's post are seen in Lebanon from the Israeli side of the border, near Zar'it in northern Israel August 28, 2019. (Reuters)
Updated 13 October 2019

Lebanon says Israel sent drone over Hezbollah area

BEIRUT: The Lebanese army on Sunday accused Israel of sending a reconnaissance drone at the weekend over Beirut's southern suburbs, a bastion of the Shiite militant Hezbollah group.
On August 25, two explosives-laden drones were sent to the same area. One of them exploded, sparking a dangerous escalation between Hezbollah and Israel.
On Saturday night, "one of the Israel enemy's reconnaissance drones violated Lebanese air space... overflew the southern suburbs and left," the army said in a statement.
The Iran-backed Hezbollah is represented in Lebanon's government and parliament but is considered a terrorist organisation by Israel and Washington, which has stepped up the financial pressure on the organisation.
The August incident heightened regional tensions, which culminated in a cross-border exchange of fire in early September.
Hezbollah vowed then that it would shoot down any Israeli drones violating Lebanon's air space.


State of emergency extended in Tunisia by 6 months

Updated 30 May 2020

State of emergency extended in Tunisia by 6 months

  • A state of emergency has been in effect in Tunisia since a suicide attack on a police bus in November 2015
  • Successive governments since the uprising of 2011 have failed to resolve stubbornly high inflation and unemployment

LONDON: Tunisian President Kais Saied announced an extension to the state of emergency in the country by six months starting from Saturday. 
A state of emergency has been in effect in Tunisia since a suicide attack on a police bus in November 2015. It has been extended a number of times.
On Thursday, hundreds of Tunisians protested in at least seven cities to demand jobs, which has heaped pressure on a government facing the worse economic crisis in more than 60 years due to the coronavirus pandemic.
Even before the outbreak hammered Tunisia’s tourism sector, which accounts for nearly 10% of gross domestic product, successive governments since the uprising of 2011 have failed to resolve stubbornly high inflation and unemployment that has bred discontent, especially among young people.