Tunisia presidential candidate to stay in jail

Salwa Smaoui, the wife of Tunisia's jailed presidential candidate Nabil Karoui (portrait) facing corruption charges, holds his election poster during a campaign event in Tunis on September 13, 2019. (AFP)
Updated 18 September 2019

Tunisia presidential candidate to stay in jail

  • “The judge has refused to give a ruling, saying it was not in his jurisdiction”

TUNIS: A fresh appeal for the release of jailed media mogul Nabil Karoui who has a reached a runoff in Tunisia’s presidential polls was turned down on Wednesday, his lawyers said.
“The judge has refused to give a ruling, saying it was not in his jurisdiction,” lawyer Kamel Ben Messoud said, after requesting his release the previous day.
“We will appeal,” he told AFP.
The court did not immediately respond to a request for confirmation.
Karoui, a 56-year-old media magnate, is under investigation for alleged money laundering and has been in pretrial detention since August 23.
Lawyer Nazih Souii said it was the third time a judge had said the matter was beyond his jurisdiction.
The court of appeals refused to pass judgment on September 3, as did the court of cassation on September 13.
Tunisia’s electoral commission, ISIE, has confirmed Karoui made it to the presidential runoff along with law professor Kais Saied following Sunday’s first round vote.
Karoui remains eligible to run despite his imprisonment, as long as any conviction does not also specifically deprive him of his civil rights, according to ISIE.
He campaigned through the Nessma television channel he founded. ISIE has said it is investigating alleged electoral violations, including by Nessma TV.
Depending on potential appeals, the second round could be staged on October 6, the same day as legislative elections, or on October 13, ISIE said.
Observers from the European Union said the first round has been “transparent.”
But it called for the candidates to have the “same opportunities” to campaign, in an apparent allusion to Karoui.


Lebanon’s parliamentary blocs to help Hariri form new government

Updated 23 October 2020

Lebanon’s parliamentary blocs to help Hariri form new government

  • Lawmakers emphasize need to expedite reform process
  • Parliamentary blocs that met Hariri expressed a sense of optimism and cooperation

BEIRUT: Lebanese Prime Minister-designate Saad Hariri on Friday held consultations with lawmakers about the new government he will form.
He held the non-binding meetings at the parliament’s headquarters despite the damage it suffered after the Beirut Port explosion on Aug. 4.
There were tough security measures at entrances leading to parliament and there were no protests nearby, despite activists’ anger about Hariri’s nomination to lead the country. He resigned a year ago as prime minister following massive demonstrations against Lebanon’s political elite. 
“Hariri is sticking to forming a government of non-party member specialists whose mission is to implement economic, financial, and administrative reforms as cited by the French initiative, which the parliamentary blocs vowed to support,” sources close to Hariri told Arab News. “Hariri listened to the points of view of the lawmakers, noting that since his nomination he has not talked to anyone about details related to the government which he intends to form.”
Parliamentary blocs that met Hariri expressed a sense of optimism and cooperation, especially those that did not nominate him on Thursday to form the government. Representatives of these blocs were unanimous in emphasizing the importance of speeding up the reform process to save the country from its economic crisis.
“Talks were straightforward and open,” lawmaker Gebran Bassil said after his meeting. “There is no personal problem with Hariri and we are extremely positive, and we are concerned in implementing the reforms cited by the French proposal.”
He asked that reforms start with a forensic investigation and the imposition of capital control, and to agree on a joint program with the International Monetary Fund (IMF).
“The priority is for qualified people and we wait for what President Michel Aoun and Hariri will agree on, so that we determine our stance toward forming the government, noting that we are ready to facilitate the process.”
Lawmaker Mohammed Raad, head of Hezbollah parliamentary bloc, said after his Hariri meeting: “We tendered our point of view regarding the role of the government, and this is something that we consented on to a large extent. We discussed reform issues related to administration, the judiciary, and control agencies, calling for rectifying the financial and banking situation, in addition to other issues cited in the French initiative which we vowed to support 90 percent of them. We advised to adopt a method whereas each minister would hold one portfolio so that he would be capable of sorting out its problems. We advised not to have a small government, and to have between 22 and 24 ministers, and expressed our readiness to cooperate.”
Former Prime Minister Tammam Salam said he hoped that the government would be formed by a harmonious team to implement the required reforms during a three to six month period. “Parliament is there to question and hold accountability, in addition to follow up all government actions, and this cannot be achieved during this period in a traditional way as if things are all fine in the country.”
Dr. Nasser Yassin said that the spirit of openness and cooperation after a period of acrimony and accusation was about maintaining a minimum level of stability in Lebanon within the framework of the French initiative.
“The collapse of Lebanon affects neighboring countries, and we have already seen refugee boats sailing in the direction of Cyprus,” he told Arab News. “Nobody wants to increase the crises of the region, the crises of Syria, Iraq, Yemen, and Libya are enough, and what is needed is to maintain a minimum stability in Lebanon. I do not see new equations.”
He added that what was happening in Lebanon was the failure of some in leading the country, the attempts of some parties to undermine the role of other parties, and the game to save the political order while maintaining the same political behavior.