What We Are Reading Today: The Geography of Risk by Gilbert M. Gaul

Updated 09 September 2019

What We Are Reading Today: The Geography of Risk by Gilbert M. Gaul

Hurricanes and other coastal storms create more costly damage than do earthquakes, tornadoes and wildfires combined, and 17 of the 20 most destructive hurricanes in history have occurred since 2000. 

“The Geography of Risk will forever change the way you think about the coasts, from the clash between economic interests and nature, to the heated politics of regulators and developers,” said a review in goodreads.com. 

“This book is fairly comprehensive in its history of coastal development, with particular emphasis on the back bays of New Jersey but also discussing development all the way South to Florida and up along the Florida Gulf Coast all the way to Galveston Bay and Houston, with detailed discussions of Mobile and New Orleans along the way,” said the review. 

“And even discounting its heavy emphasis on global warming/global cooling/climate change ... whatever the alarmists are calling it these days, the book paints a stark picture about just how much coastal redevelopment costs people all over the country n the post-Second World War era,” said the review. 

 

 


What We Are Reading Today: No Stopping Us Now by Gail Collins

Updated 18 October 2019

What We Are Reading Today: No Stopping Us Now by Gail Collins

No Stopping Us Now is lively, fascinating, eye-opening look at women and aging in America, by New York Times columnist Gail Collins.

Collins was the editorial page editor of The New York Times from 2001 to Jan. 1, 2007. 

She was the first woman editorial page editor at the Times.

No Stopping Us Now “is a chronicle of the herky-jerky nature of older women’s journey to progress in the US over the years,” said Lesley Stahl in a review for the Times.

“It’s eye-opening, brimming with new information and, as you’d expect from Collins, a lot of fun,” added Stahl.

Stahl is a correspondent for 60 Minutes and the author of Becoming Grandma and Reporting Live.

Collins “has delivered a deeply researched, entertaining book about the ragged journey of this increasingly visible segment of America’s population, bringing a reporter’s eye to the facts and anecdotes, and never without humor,” said Stahl.

Collins was also a journalism instructor at Southern Connecticut State University.

Collins’ excavation of the past has produced a vault of nuggets and gems, added Stahl.