Crude drops as trade war rumbles on and output swells

An oil terminal in Novorossiysk, Russia. Oil prices fell by 2 percent on Tuesday, weighed down by rising OPEC and Russian oil output. (Reuters)
Updated 04 September 2019

Crude drops as trade war rumbles on and output swells

LONDON: Oil prices fell by 2 percent on Tuesday, weighed down by rising OPEC and Russian oil output as well as the protracted US-China trade dispute that has dragged on the global economy. US crude was down $1.26 at $53.84 a barrel while Brent crude was down 96 cents at $57.70 in
afternoon trade.

The US this week imposed 15 percent tariffs on Chinese goods and China began to impose new duties on a $75 billion target list in a trade war that has rumbled on for more than a year. Though the trade conflict has intensified, US President Donald Trump said both sides would meet for talks this month.

Meanwhile, South Korea’s economy expanded less than expected in the second quarter, with exports revised down in the face of the US-China dispute, central bank data showed on Tuesday.

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Russian oil production in August rose to 11.294 million barrels per day (bpd) hitting its highest since March.

A move on Sunday by Argentina to impose capital controls also cast a spotlight on emerging market risks. “Oil will struggle to make substantial headway topside this week with no progress on trade talks or meetings even, soft data from Asia and a possible cracking of OPEC’s resolve to control production,” said Jeffrey Halley, senior market analyst at OANDA.

Output OPEC rose in August for the first month this year as higher supply from Iraq and Nigeria outweighed restraint by Saudi Arabia and losses caused by US sanctions on Iran. Russian oil production in August rose to 11.294 million barrels per day (bpd), topping the rate cap pledged by Moscow in a pact with other producers and hitting its highest since March, data showed on Monday.

“What’s bad for the outlook for global growth is bad for oil at the moment and only big draws in inventories can delay that drift lower,” said Greg McKenna, strategist at McKenna Macro.


UAE central bank backs anti-money laundering

Updated 25 September 2020

UAE central bank backs anti-money laundering

  • Move to safeguard financial stability in COVID-hit economy

DUBAI: The UAE central bank has said that banks should increase anti-money laundering efforts to safeguard financial stability in the country.

“To mitigate the risk of financial crimes . . . banks are urged to put more efforts towardcombating money laundering and financing of terrorism,” it said in a statement.

The bank said more than 300,000 individuals, close to 10,000 small and medium enterprises, and more than 1,500 private companies, had benefited from a 50 billion dirhams ($14 billion) liquidity scheme introduced to cushion against the impact of the COVID-19 pandemic.

On Wednesday, the UAE reported its highest daily number of coronavirus infections since the start of the pandemic.

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The UAE Central Bank expects the country’s economy to contract by 5.2 percent this year.

In a separate report, the central bank said this week that the UAE economy would likely contract by 5.2 percent this year, revising down a previous 3.6 percent contraction forecast, as virus containment measures hurt sectors such as trade and tourism.

It said that manufacturing production shrank “due to supply chain disruptions, limited export opportunities and subdued domestic demand.”

The UAE said on Thursday that it would resume issuing visas to foreign visitors to all seven of its regions after a six-month suspension imposed due to the pandemic, state media reported.

Dubai, the region’s tourism and business hub and one of the seven emirates that make up the UAE, had already lifted its own visa ban in July.

The Federal Authority for Identity and Citizenship said in a statement carried in state media that the decision was taken as part of the easing of COVID-19 restrictions in the Gulf state as well as efforts to support economic recovery plans.

All six Gulf Arab countries have lifted internal curfews and lockdowns, but restrictions on gatherings and foreign travel remain in the oil-producing region, where the total number of COVID cases stands at more than 800,000, with more than 6,800 deaths.

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