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GRAND ISLE, LA - AUGUST 24: A fisherman hauls in a drum fish while competing in the Ride the Bull Kayak Tournament in the waters between Caminada Bay and the Gulf of Mexico on August 24, 2019 in Grand Isle, Louisiana. The Coastal Conservation Association (CCA) of Louisiana hosts the event and it's billed as the world's largest kayak fishing tournament. According to researchers at the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA), Louisiana's combination of rising waters and sinking land give it one of the highest rates of relative sea level rise on the planet. Since the 1930s, Louisiana has lost over 2,000 square miles of land and wetlands, an area roughly the size of Delaware. In the past 30 years, as subsidence continues and the effects of climate change increase, Louisiana has been losing its coastal landscape at the rate of almost a football fields worth of land every hour. Drew Angerer/Getty Images/AFP == FOR NEWSPAPERS, INTERNET, TELCOS & TELEVISION USE ONLY ==
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GRAND ISLE, LA - AUGUST 24: Competitive fishermen and women launch into the water at the start of the Ride the Bull Kayak Tournament at Bridge Side Marina on August 24, 2019 in Grand Isle, Louisiana. The Coastal Conservation Association (CCA) of Louisiana hosts the event and it's billed as the world's largest kayak fishing tournament. According to researchers at the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA), Louisiana's combination of rising waters and sinking land give it one of the highest rates of relative sea level rise on the planet. Since the 1930s, Louisiana has lost over 2,000 square miles of land and wetlands, an area roughly the size of Delaware. In the past 30 years, as subsidence continues and the effects of climate change increase, Louisiana has been losing its coastal landscape at the rate of almost a football fields worth of land every hour. Drew Angerer/Getty Images/AFP == FOR NEWSPAPERS, INTERNET, TELCOS & TELEVISION USE ONLY ==
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GRAND ISLE, LA - AUGUST 24: A fisherman hauls in a bull redfish while competing in the Ride the Bull Kayak Tournament in the waters between Caminada Bay and the Gulf of Mexico on August 24, 2019 in Grand Isle, Louisiana. The Coastal Conservation Association (CCA) of Louisiana hosts the event and it's billed as the world's largest kayak fishing tournament. According to researchers at the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA), Louisiana's combination of rising waters and sinking land give it one of the highest rates of relative sea level rise on the planet. Since the 1930s, Louisiana has lost over 2,000 square miles of land and wetlands, an area roughly the size of Delaware. In the past 30 years, as subsidence continues and the effects of climate change increase, Louisiana has been losing its coastal landscape at the rate of almost a football fields worth of land every hour. Drew Angerer/Getty Images/AFP == FOR NEWSPAPERS, INTERNET, TELCOS & TELEVISION USE ONLY ==
4 / 10
GRAND ISLE, LA - AUGUST 24: Competitive fishermen and women launch into the water at the start of the Ride the Bull Kayak Tournament at Bridge Side Marina on August 24, 2019 in Grand Isle, Louisiana. The Coastal Conservation Association (CCA) of Louisiana hosts the event and it's billed as the world's largest kayak fishing tournament. According to researchers at the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA), Louisiana's combination of rising waters and sinking land give it one of the highest rates of relative sea level rise on the planet. Since the 1930s, Louisiana has lost over 2,000 square miles of land and wetlands, an area roughly the size of Delaware. In the past 30 years, as subsidence continues and the effects of climate change increase, Louisiana has been losing its coastal landscape at the rate of almost a football fields worth of land every hour. Drew Angerer/Getty Images/AFP == FOR NEWSPAPERS, INTERNET, TELCOS & TELEVISION USE ONLY ==
5 / 10
GRAND ISLE, LA - AUGUST 24: Competitive fishermen and women launch into the water at the start of the Ride the Bull Kayak Tournament at Bridge Side Marina on August 24, 2019 in Grand Isle, Louisiana. The Coastal Conservation Association (CCA) of Louisiana hosts the event and it's billed as the world's largest kayak fishing tournament. According to researchers at the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA), Louisiana's combination of rising waters and sinking land give it one of the highest rates of relative sea level rise on the planet. Since the 1930s, Louisiana has lost over 2,000 square miles of land and wetlands, an area roughly the size of Delaware. In the past 30 years, as subsidence continues and the effects of climate change increase, Louisiana has been losing its coastal landscape at the rate of almost a football fields worth of land every hour. Drew Angerer/Getty Images/AFP == FOR NEWSPAPERS, INTERNET, TELCOS & TELEVISION USE ONLY ==
6 / 10
GRAND ISLE, LA - AUGUST 24: Competitive fishermen and women launch into the water at the start of the Ride the Bull Kayak Tournament at Bridge Side Marina on August 24, 2019 in Grand Isle, Louisiana. The Coastal Conservation Association (CCA) of Louisiana hosts the event and it's billed as the world's largest kayak fishing tournament. According to researchers at the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA), Louisiana's combination of rising waters and sinking land give it one of the highest rates of relative sea level rise on the planet. Since the 1930s, Louisiana has lost over 2,000 square miles of land and wetlands, an area roughly the size of Delaware. In the past 30 years, as subsidence continues and the effects of climate change increase, Louisiana has been losing its coastal landscape at the rate of almost a football fields worth of land every hour. Drew Angerer/Getty Images/AFP == FOR NEWSPAPERS, INTERNET, TELCOS & TELEVISION USE ONLY ==
7 / 10
GRAND ISLE, LA - AUGUST 24: Competitive fishermen and women launch into the water at the start of the Ride the Bull Kayak Tournament at Bridge Side Marina on August 24, 2019 in Grand Isle, Louisiana. The Coastal Conservation Association (CCA) of Louisiana hosts the event and it's billed as the world's largest kayak fishing tournament. According to researchers at the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA), Louisiana's combination of rising waters and sinking land give it one of the highest rates of relative sea level rise on the planet. Since the 1930s, Louisiana has lost over 2,000 square miles of land and wetlands, an area roughly the size of Delaware. In the past 30 years, as subsidence continues and the effects of climate change increase, Louisiana has been losing its coastal landscape at the rate of almost a football fields worth of land every hour. Drew Angerer/Getty Images/AFP == FOR NEWSPAPERS, INTERNET, TELCOS & TELEVISION USE ONLY ==
8 / 10
GRAND ISLE, LA - AUGUST 24: Competitive fishermen in kayaks compete in the Ride the Bull Kayak Tournament in the waters between Caminada Bay and the Gulf of Mexico on August 24, 2019 in Grand Isle, Louisiana. The Coastal Conservation Association (CCA) of Louisiana hosts the event and it's billed as the world's largest kayak fishing tournament. According to researchers at the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA), Louisiana's combination of rising waters and sinking land give it one of the highest rates of relative sea level rise on the planet. Since the 1930s, Louisiana has lost over 2,000 square miles of land and wetlands, an area roughly the size of Delaware. In the past 30 years, as subsidence continues and the effects of climate change increase, Louisiana has been losing its coastal landscape at the rate of almost a football fields worth of land every hour. Drew Angerer/Getty Images/AFP == FOR NEWSPAPERS, INTERNET, TELCOS & TELEVISION USE ONLY ==
9 / 10
GRAND ISLE, LA - AUGUST 24: Competitive fishermen in kayaks compete in the Ride the Bull Kayak Tournament in the waters between Caminada Bay and the Gulf of Mexico on August 24, 2019 in Grand Isle, Louisiana. The Coastal Conservation Association (CCA) of Louisiana hosts the event and it's billed as the world's largest kayak fishing tournament. According to researchers at the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA), Louisiana's combination of rising waters and sinking land give it one of the highest rates of relative sea level rise on the planet. Since the 1930s, Louisiana has lost over 2,000 square miles of land and wetlands, an area roughly the size of Delaware. In the past 30 years, as subsidence continues and the effects of climate change increase, Louisiana has been losing its coastal landscape at the rate of almost a football fields worth of land every hour. Drew Angerer/Getty Images/AFP == FOR NEWSPAPERS, INTERNET, TELCOS & TELEVISION USE ONLY ==
10 / 10
GRAND ISLE, LA - AUGUST 24: Competitive fishermen in kayaks compete in the Ride the Bull Kayak Tournament in the waters between Caminada Bay and the Gulf of Mexico on August 24, 2019 in Grand Isle, Louisiana. The Coastal Conservation Association (CCA) of Louisiana hosts the event and it's billed as the world's largest kayak fishing tournament. According to researchers at the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA), Louisiana's combination of rising waters and sinking land give it one of the highest rates of relative sea level rise on the planet. Since the 1930s, Louisiana has lost over 2,000 square miles of land and wetlands, an area roughly the size of Delaware. In the past 30 years, as subsidence continues and the effects of climate change increase, Louisiana has been losing its coastal landscape at the rate of almost a football fields worth of land every hour. Drew Angerer/Getty Images/AFP == FOR NEWSPAPERS, INTERNET, TELCOS & TELEVISION USE ONLY ==
Updated 28 August 2019

Ride the Bull Kayak Tournament

Ride the Bull Kayak Tournament

The Coastal Conservation Association (CCA) of Louisiana hosts the Ride the Bull Kayak Tournament in the waters between Caminada Bay and the Gulf of Mexico in Grand Isle and it's billed as the world's largest kayak fishing tournament. According to researchers at the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA), Louisiana's combination of rising waters and sinking land give it one of the highest rates of relative sea level rise on the planet. Since the 1930s, Louisiana has lost over 2,000 square miles of land and wetlands, an area roughly the size of Delaware. In the past 30 years, as subsidence continues and the effects of climate change increase, Louisiana has been losing its coastal landscape at the rate of almost a football fields worth of land every hour.