What We Are Reading Today: Drive by Daniel H. Pink

Updated 26 August 2019

What We Are Reading Today: Drive by Daniel H. Pink

  • Drive is bursting with big ideas — the rare book that will change how you think

Forget everything you thought you knew about how to motivate people — at work, at school, at home. It is wrong. As Daniel H. Pink explains in his paradigm-shattering book Drive, the secret to high performance and satisfaction in today’s world is the deeply human need to direct our own lives, to learn and create new things, and to do better by ourselves and our world.

Drawing on four decades of scientific research on human motivation, Pink exposes the mismatch between what science knows and what business does — and how that affects every aspect of our lives, says a review published on goodreads.com.

He demonstrates that while the old-fashioned carrot-and-stick approach worked successfully in the 20th century, it is precisely the wrong way to motivate people for today’s challenges.

Along the way, he takes us to companies that are enlisting new approaches to motivation and introduces us to the scientists and entrepreneurs who are pointing a bold way forward.

Drive is bursting with big ideas — the rare book that will change how you think and transform how you live.


What We Are Reading Today: Widen the Window

Updated 13 October 2019

What We Are Reading Today: Widen the Window

  • Why an event that is stressful for one person can be traumatizing for another

Stress is our internal response to an experience that our brain perceives as threatening or challenging. Trauma is our response to an experience in which we feel powerless or lacking agency. Until now, researchers have treated these conditions as different, but they actually lie along a continuum. 

Dr. Elizabeth Stanley explains the significance of this continuum, how it affects our resilience in the face of challenge, and why an event that is stressful for one person can be traumatizing for another.

This groundbreaking book examines the cultural norms that impede resilience in America, especially our collective tendency to disconnect stress from its potentially extreme consequences and override our need to recover, according to a review published on goodreads.com.

It explains the science of how to direct our attention to perform under stress and recover from trauma.

With stories from men and women Dr. Stanley has trained in settings as varied as military bases, health care facilities, and Capitol Hill, as well as her own striking experiences with stress and trauma, she gives readers hands-on strategies they can use themselves.