Lanka’s army chief rejects ‘war crime’ allegations

Armed forces wiped out separatist rebels in 2009 in an operation that ended a decades-long war, which killed tens of thousands of people. (AFP)
Updated 23 August 2019
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Lanka’s army chief rejects ‘war crime’ allegations

  • US envoy says ‘terrible things’ happened in civil war

COLOMBO: Sri Lanka’s newly appointed army chief on Friday hit back against allegations he was connected to war crimes during the country’s brutal civil war, saying the military had acted in “keeping with international humanitarian laws and rights.”

Lt. Gen. Shavendra Silva, who led the 58th Division of the Sri Lankan Army, has been named in several UN reports for grave violations of international humanitarian law that contributed to war crimes, including the shelling of a hospital.

The US and the UN are among those who have expressed concern about his appointment. But Silva defended himself against the criticism. 

“Any army in the world is committed to protect the inalienable rights of the country’s citizens and create a conducive atmosphere for a democratic way of life, while being alert to adopt any measures against internal or external threats with determination,” he said. 

“During past humanitarian operations, we adhered to those guidelines, acceptable to any state, and acted in keeping with international humanitarian laws and rights.”

Armed forces wiped out separatist rebels in 2009 in an operation that ended a decades-long war, which killed tens of thousands of people.

The UN has estimated that around 45,000 ethnic Tamil civilians might have been killed in the last months of the fighting, while other estimates put the number much higher.

The US ambassador to Sri Lanka, Alaina Teplitz, said it was her obligation to share Washington’s policies and decisions.

FASTFACTS

• Sri Lankan forces wiped out separatist rebels in 2009 in an operation that ended a decades-long war.

• The UN has estimated that around 45,000 ethnic Tamil civilians might have been killed in the last months of the fighting.

“We have expressed our concern for Sri Lanka’s reputation, the government’s commitment to its people regarding justice and accountability. We are not asking the government to appoint this person or that person. We are only articulating our position on this matter. 

“We are not telling Sri Lanka what to do. People here and the government can decide what they are going to do about it. I certainly hope that they take our concerns, and those of other nations, into consideration.”

She said one of the commitments made by the Sri Lankan government was to seek truth, reconciliation and accountability and there needed to be a process to fully address these. 

“There are credible allegations in the case of Silva. There will be a good outcome. They can go before (a) court. Then the court can make a decision accordingly. But that has not happened."

Whether the allegations were serious and credible or not were different issues, she added, but there was a lot of documentation that had been put together by the UN and other organizations. 

“During the 30-year war, terrible things happened, perpetrated by both sides. There is a need to get to the bottom of them.”

The official Sri Lankan army website says Silva has had an “illustrious” career, and that the 58th Division under his stewardship “liberated the country from terrorism.”

Sri Lanka’s Foreign Ministry said Silva’s appointment was a “sovereign decision” by President Maithripala Sirisena.

“Foreign entities trying to influence the decisions and internal administrative processes of public service promotions in Sri Lanka is unwarranted and unacceptable,” it said in a statement.

The US has given more than $1 billion in grants and direct development assistance to Sri Lanka since it gained independence from Britain in 1948.  

More than 10,000 households have directly benefited from US government assistance, and these households’ gross income is now in excess of $10.7 million. 

More than 5,000 micro-enterprises have benefited from US support, with total sales reported by all investment grantees of $68 million.


Johnson the Brexit ‘Hulk’ finally meets EU’s Juncker

Updated 16 September 2019
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Johnson the Brexit ‘Hulk’ finally meets EU’s Juncker

  • Downing Street has confidently billed the Luxembourg visit as part of efforts to negotiate an orderly divorce from the union

LUXEMBOURG: British Prime Minister Boris Johnson met EU chief Jean-Claude Juncker for talks Monday insisting a Brexit deal is possible, despite deep skepticism from European capitals with just six weeks to go before departure day.
After a weekend in which he compared himself to comic book super-smasher Hulk, the British leader will enjoy a genteel working lunch of snails and salmon in Luxembourg with the EU Commission president.
Downing Street has confidently billed the Luxembourg visit as part of efforts to negotiate an orderly divorce from the union before an October 17 EU summit.
A UK spokesman said Johnson would tell Juncker that “progress has been made, given that before the summer recess many said reopening talks would not be possible.
“The UK needs to enact the referendum result and avoid another delay; the UK wants to deliver Brexit and move on to other priorities, and EU member states’ leaders want to renegotiate an orderly Brexit.”
But Brussels has played down talk of a breakthrough, insisting Johnson has yet to suggest any “legally operable” proposal to revise a previous withdrawal accord.
As he shook hands with Johnson, Juncker declared himself “cautiously optimistic” and insisted that “Europe never loses patience” despite the tortuous Brexit saga dragging on over three years.
Finland’s European affairs minister, Tytti Tuppurainen, who was chairing an EU ministerial meeting in Brussels, gave a more downbeat assessment, repeating the bloc’s long-standing complaint that London has simply not come up with detailed ideas for replacing the so-called “Irish backstop” section of the divorce deal.
“The European Union is always ready to negotiate when a proper proposal from the UK side is presented,” Tuppurainen said.
“So far I haven’t seen any proposal that would compensate the backstop.”
The EU’s chief Brexit negotiator Michel Barnier, who joined the leaders for their talks in Juncker’s native Grand Duchy, said last week he has “no reason to be optimistic.”
The European Parliament will this week vote on a resolution rejecting Johnson’s demand that the backstop clause be stripped from the deal.
Johnson insists this measure, which temporarily keeps the UK in the EU customs union, has to go if he is to bring the agreement back to the House of Commons.
But the accord will also have to win the support of the other 27 EU leaders and the European Parliament if Britain is not to crash out with no deal on October 31 — a scenario that businesses warn would bring economic chaos.
Johnson, in turn, boasts that he would rather be “dead in a ditch” than ask his European counterparts to postpone Brexit for a third time.
“Be in no doubt that if we cannot get a deal — the right deal for both sides — then the UK will come out anyway,” Johnson said, writing in the Daily Telegraph on Monday.
A UK spokesman said that Britain would refuse an extension even if one were offered.
It is difficult, then, to see what might come from the lunch. There is no plan for a joint statement, but Barnier will meet Britain’s Brexit minister Stephen Barclay for separate discussions.
Speaking to the BBC on Sunday, Barclay indicated that any post-Brexit transition period could be extended past 2020 in order to resolve issues with the border.
Johnson, meanwhile, compared himself to Marvel comics hero Hulk, the rampaging mutant alter-ego of a mild-mannered nuclear scientist.
“The madder Hulk gets, the stronger Hulk gets and he always escaped, no matter how tightly bound in he seemed to be,” Johnson told the Mail on Sunday.
Johnson’s strategy faces resistance at home, where rebel and opposition MPs have passed a law aimed at forcing him to seek a Brexit delay.
Britain’s Supreme Court will rule this week on a bid to overturn Johnson’s decision to suspend parliament and limit time to debate the crisis.
Barnier will address the European Parliament session in Strasbourg on Wednesday as MEPs vote to reaffirm and reinforce the EU Brexit stance — and insist that the backstop must stay.
After his lunch with Juncker, Johnson is due to meet Luxembourg’s Prime Minister Xavier Bettel. The pair will hold a joint news conference.