Meghan Markle’s Vogue edit spotlights changemakers

Meghan Markle spent seven months working with British Vogue’s Editor-in-Chief Edward Enninful on the issue. (AFP)
Updated 29 July 2019

Meghan Markle’s Vogue edit spotlights changemakers

DUBAI: Meghan Markle, the Duchess of Sussex, has guest edited the September issue of British Vogue with the theme “Forces for Change” and has revealed that actors Jameela Jamil, Yara Shahidi and Salma Hayek Pinault will be featured alongside 12 other women on the cover.  




British Vogue with the theme “Forces for Change.” (AFP)

Royal officials say the issue coming out Aug. 2 features “change-makers united by their fearlessness in breaking barriers” and includes a conversation between Meghan and former US first lady Michelle Obama, The Associated Press reported.

The magazine cover features 15 women, including New Zealand Prime Minister Jacinda Ardern, actresses Jane Fonda, Jamil, Gemma Chan and Shahidi, model Adwoa Aboah, climate change campaigner Greta Thunberg, boxer Ramla Ali and actor and women’s rights advocate Hayek Pinault.

Meghan, who is on maternity leave from her royal duties, said she hopes readers will be inspired by the magazine’s focus on the “values, causes, and people making impact in the world today.”

The Duchess of Sussex, who gave birth to her first child in May, spent seven months working with British Vogue’s Editor-in-Chief Edward Enninful on the issue, Reuters reported.




Jameela Jamil (AFP) 

The former actress, 37, said in a statement she had sought to steer the focus of the September issue — usually the year’s most read — to “the values, causes and people making impact in the world today.”

British actress Jamil, who was born to a Pakistani mother and an Indian father in London, took to Instagram Stories to celebrate, posting a photo of the grid-like cover with the caption, “They are all heroes.”

“The Good Place” star has made it her personal mission to promote body positivity and founded the “I Weigh” movement in 2018 by launching an Instagram account where she shares inspiring images sent in by followers detailing their accomplishments and positive characteristics, rather than what they weigh.




Yara Shahidi (AFP) 

Author Chimamanda Ngozi Adichie, Royal Ballet principal dancer Francesca Hayward, and model and former refugee Adut Akech are among others featured in a list that also includes mental health and diversity campaigners.

“Through this lens I hope you’ll feel the strength of the collective in the diverse selection of women chosen for the cover as well as the team of support I called upon within the issue to help bring this to light,” Meghan said in the statement.

“I hope readers feel as inspired as I do, by the ‘Forces for Change’ they’ll find within these pages.”


Bob Dylan drops first original music in nearly a decade

Updated 27 March 2020

Bob Dylan drops first original music in nearly a decade

  • The song is packed with artist name-drops and pop culture references, including to The Beatles, Charlie Parker, the Eagles, Stevie Nicks and the Woodstock festival
  • It’s the folk singer’s first original song since his 2012 album “Tempest,” though he has released a number of cover albums in the interim

NEW YORK: Bob Dylan surprised fans overnight into Friday by releasing his first original music in eight years, a 17-minute ballad about the assassination of John F. Kennedy.
Backed by delicate piano, strings and muted drums, “Murder Most Foul” retells the shooting of the US president while describing the evolution of 1960s counterculture.
“This is an unreleased song we recorded a while back that you might find interesting. Stay safe, stay observant, and may God be with you,” Dylan posted on his website, along with a portrait of Kennedy, who was slain in 1963 while riding in a motorcade through Dallas.
The song is packed with artist name-drops and pop culture references, including to The Beatles, Charlie Parker, the Eagles, Stevie Nicks and the Woodstock festival.
“Shot down like a dog in broad daylight / Was a matter of timing and the timing was right / You got unpaid debts; we’ve come to collect / We’re gonna kill you with hatred; without any respect,” Dylan recounts in his signature sandpaper vocals.
It’s the folk singer’s first original song since his 2012 album “Tempest,” though he has released a number of cover albums in the interim.
“Murder Most Foul” is also the first song Dylan has penned and released since he reluctantly accepted the 2016 Nobel Prize for Literature, the first songwriter awarded the honor.
At 78, Dylan has maintained a relentless touring schedule, though he was forced to cancel a string of April dates in Japan over the coronavirus pandemic.
The artist is still set to kick off a North American tour in June.