Meghan Markle’s Vogue edit spotlights changemakers

Meghan Markle spent seven months working with British Vogue’s Editor-in-Chief Edward Enninful on the issue. (AFP)
Updated 29 July 2019

Meghan Markle’s Vogue edit spotlights changemakers

DUBAI: Meghan Markle, the Duchess of Sussex, has guest edited the September issue of British Vogue with the theme “Forces for Change” and has revealed that actors Jameela Jamil, Yara Shahidi and Salma Hayek Pinault will be featured alongside 12 other women on the cover.  




British Vogue with the theme “Forces for Change.” (AFP)

Royal officials say the issue coming out Aug. 2 features “change-makers united by their fearlessness in breaking barriers” and includes a conversation between Meghan and former US first lady Michelle Obama, The Associated Press reported.

The magazine cover features 15 women, including New Zealand Prime Minister Jacinda Ardern, actresses Jane Fonda, Jamil, Gemma Chan and Shahidi, model Adwoa Aboah, climate change campaigner Greta Thunberg, boxer Ramla Ali and actor and women’s rights advocate Hayek Pinault.

Meghan, who is on maternity leave from her royal duties, said she hopes readers will be inspired by the magazine’s focus on the “values, causes, and people making impact in the world today.”

The Duchess of Sussex, who gave birth to her first child in May, spent seven months working with British Vogue’s Editor-in-Chief Edward Enninful on the issue, Reuters reported.




Jameela Jamil (AFP) 

The former actress, 37, said in a statement she had sought to steer the focus of the September issue — usually the year’s most read — to “the values, causes and people making impact in the world today.”

British actress Jamil, who was born to a Pakistani mother and an Indian father in London, took to Instagram Stories to celebrate, posting a photo of the grid-like cover with the caption, “They are all heroes.”

“The Good Place” star has made it her personal mission to promote body positivity and founded the “I Weigh” movement in 2018 by launching an Instagram account where she shares inspiring images sent in by followers detailing their accomplishments and positive characteristics, rather than what they weigh.




Yara Shahidi (AFP) 

Author Chimamanda Ngozi Adichie, Royal Ballet principal dancer Francesca Hayward, and model and former refugee Adut Akech are among others featured in a list that also includes mental health and diversity campaigners.

“Through this lens I hope you’ll feel the strength of the collective in the diverse selection of women chosen for the cover as well as the team of support I called upon within the issue to help bring this to light,” Meghan said in the statement.

“I hope readers feel as inspired as I do, by the ‘Forces for Change’ they’ll find within these pages.”


K-pop group BTS: New album tells of conquering doubts and fears

Updated 24 February 2020

K-pop group BTS: New album tells of conquering doubts and fears

  • BTS stands at the forefront of South Korean pop music and has helped gather an international audience for the genre
  • BTS broke into the US market in 2017 and was the first Korean group to win a Billboard music award

SEOUL: The young stars in South Korean boy band BTS said on Monday the theme of their new album dealt with how they overcame doubts and fears encountered since they burst on the K-pop scene seven years ago.
Having performed at the Grammy Awards in Los Angeles last month, BTS stands at the forefront of South Korean pop music and has helped gather an international audience for the genre.
On Friday, the band released “Map of the Soul: 7,” its fourth album. The 20 tracks include collaborations with Sia and Troye Sivan.
Plans for a large media event in Seoul for the album were ditched due to the coronavirus health scare in South Korea, but the band instead livestreamed a news conference based on preregistered questions.
“Sometimes we were uncertain, sometimes we were lost. Every time that happened, the shadows and fear inside us grew,” rapper Suga told the news conference aired via YouTube.
“But it’s been seven years. I think we have grounded ourselves now, and we learned how to do that, the difficulties and wounds we face and fight them.”
Though several young K-Pop stars have struggled with cyberbullying and depression, Suga did not elaborate on what difficulties BTS faced.
But the group, whose seven members are in their Twenties, took an unexpectedly long vacation last year to “recharge.”
When asked about the comment by Bong Joon-ho, director of the Oscar-winning “Parasite,” who recently said BTS was 3,000 times more influential than him, Suga said he was an avid fan of Bong’s work and hoped more South Korean artists would be introduced to the world.
Leader and rapper RM likened K-pop to a “giftbox” integrating music, dance, video and interaction with fans, saying the personal elements the band infuses in its music might have boosted its global popularity.
“We try to instill personal stories in our music and dance and I think the concerns and feelings that we have resonate with people around the world,” he said.
But making music is a “constant battle to show your weakness and fight the fear of expressing your fear,” he added.
BTS broke into the US market in 2017 and was the first Korean group to win a Billboard music award. It is set to launch a new world tour in April, kicking off in Seoul.

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