Meghan Markle’s Vogue edit spotlights changemakers

Meghan Markle spent seven months working with British Vogue’s Editor-in-Chief Edward Enninful on the issue. (AFP)
Updated 29 July 2019

Meghan Markle’s Vogue edit spotlights changemakers

DUBAI: Meghan Markle, the Duchess of Sussex, has guest edited the September issue of British Vogue with the theme “Forces for Change” and has revealed that actors Jameela Jamil, Yara Shahidi and Salma Hayek Pinault will be featured alongside 12 other women on the cover.  




British Vogue with the theme “Forces for Change.” (AFP)

Royal officials say the issue coming out Aug. 2 features “change-makers united by their fearlessness in breaking barriers” and includes a conversation between Meghan and former US first lady Michelle Obama, The Associated Press reported.

The magazine cover features 15 women, including New Zealand Prime Minister Jacinda Ardern, actresses Jane Fonda, Jamil, Gemma Chan and Shahidi, model Adwoa Aboah, climate change campaigner Greta Thunberg, boxer Ramla Ali and actor and women’s rights advocate Hayek Pinault.

Meghan, who is on maternity leave from her royal duties, said she hopes readers will be inspired by the magazine’s focus on the “values, causes, and people making impact in the world today.”

The Duchess of Sussex, who gave birth to her first child in May, spent seven months working with British Vogue’s Editor-in-Chief Edward Enninful on the issue, Reuters reported.




Jameela Jamil (AFP) 

The former actress, 37, said in a statement she had sought to steer the focus of the September issue — usually the year’s most read — to “the values, causes and people making impact in the world today.”

British actress Jamil, who was born to a Pakistani mother and an Indian father in London, took to Instagram Stories to celebrate, posting a photo of the grid-like cover with the caption, “They are all heroes.”

“The Good Place” star has made it her personal mission to promote body positivity and founded the “I Weigh” movement in 2018 by launching an Instagram account where she shares inspiring images sent in by followers detailing their accomplishments and positive characteristics, rather than what they weigh.




Yara Shahidi (AFP) 

Author Chimamanda Ngozi Adichie, Royal Ballet principal dancer Francesca Hayward, and model and former refugee Adut Akech are among others featured in a list that also includes mental health and diversity campaigners.

“Through this lens I hope you’ll feel the strength of the collective in the diverse selection of women chosen for the cover as well as the team of support I called upon within the issue to help bring this to light,” Meghan said in the statement.

“I hope readers feel as inspired as I do, by the ‘Forces for Change’ they’ll find within these pages.”


Banksy loses EU trademark fight with greeting card company

Updated 17 September 2020

Banksy loses EU trademark fight with greeting card company

  • Full Colour Black claimed the trademark for “Flower Thrower” should be canceled because Banksy had not made use of it
  • The greeting card company also noted that Banksy wrote in one of his books that “copyright is for losers"

BRUSSELS: Street artist Banksy has lost a legal battle with a a greeting card company along with a European Union trademark for one of his most iconic artworks.
The cancellation division of the EU's intellectual property office said in a ruling this week that Banksy's trademark for “Flower Thrower” was filed in bad faith and declared it “invalid in its entirety.”
Also known as “Love is in The Air," the graffiti artist created the work in Jerusalem in 2005. It depicts a young protester wearing a cap and with his face half-covered throwing a bouquet of flowers.
The decision, which can be appealed, followed a dispute between UK greeting card company Full Colour Black Ltd. and the company that authenticates and handles requests dealing with Banksy's work, Pest Control Office Ltd. The British street artist's real name and identity are unknown.
Full Colour Black, which sells products printed with images of his pieces, claimed the 2014 trademark for “Flower Thrower” should be canceled because Banksy had not made use of it. The company argued he only applied for it to prevent “the ongoing use of the work which he had already permitted to be reproduced."
The greeting card company also noted that Banksy wrote in one of his books that “copyright is for losers."
After Full Colour Black started legal proceedings, Banksy opened an online store called Gross Domestic Product to sell his own range of merchandise. But the move left the EU examiners unconvinced.
“It was only during the course of the present proceedings that Banksy started to sell goods but specifically stated that they were only being sold to overcome non-use for trademark proceedings and not to commercialize the goods," they wrote in their decision.
Citing Banksy's stated contempt for intellectual property rights, the examiners also made clear that the artist's choice to keep his identity secret hurt him in the “Flower Thrower” case.
“It must be pointed out that another factor worthy of consideration is that he cannot be identified as the unquestionable owner of such works as his identity is hidden," they wrote. “It further cannot be established without question that the artist holds any copyrights to a graffiti. The contested (trademark) was filed in order for Banksy to have legal rights over the sign as he could not rely on copyright rights, but that is not a function of a trademark."
Banksy began his career spray-painting buildings in Bristol, England, and has become one of the world’s best-known artists. His mischievous and often satirical images include two policemen kissing, armed riot police with yellow smiley faces and a chimpanzee with a sign bearing the words, “Laugh now, but one day I’ll be in charge.”

Related