Welsh street named steepest in world; New Zealand loses out

Gwyn Headley and Sarah Badham hold a certificate for the record title for world's steepest street, in Harlech, Wales, Britain July 10, 2019, in this handout photo released on July 16, 2019. (Reuters)
Updated 17 July 2019

Welsh street named steepest in world; New Zealand loses out

  • The Welsh campaign was led by businessman and architectural historian Gwyn Headley. He says he feels “jubilation” now that the street has been recognized

LONDON: A street in Wales has been designated the steepest in the world after a successful campaign by residents.
The title comes at the expense of a street in New Zealand, which has apparently been eclipsed in the steepness sweepstakes.
Guinness World Records said Tuesday that the street of Ffordd Pen Llech in the seafront town of Harlech, 245 miles (395 kilometers) northwest of London, has a gradient of 37.45%, two percentage points steeper than the former title holder in Dunedin on New Zealand’s South Island.
The Welsh campaign was led by businessman and architectural historian Gwyn Headley. He says he feels “jubilation” now that the street has been recognized.
He says he feels sorry for New Zealand, but that “steeper is steeper.”


Ancient cup given to 1st marathon victor returned to Greece

Updated 14 November 2019

Ancient cup given to 1st marathon victor returned to Greece

ATHENS, Greece: An ancient Greek cup awarded as a prize to the marathon winner in the first modern Olympics of 1896 has been returned to Athens from a German university.
Greece’s Culture Ministry says the 6th century B.C. pottery vessel was considered lost for decades until research in 2014 by archaeologist Giorgos Kavvadias identified it in the University of Muenster’s collections.
A ministry statement says it was proved “beyond any doubt” that the two-handled cup painted with ancient runners was the one given to Spiros Louis, the Greek marathon victor in 1896.
Following correspondence with Greek officials, the university agreed to return the cup, which was part of a private German collection it had bought in 1986.
The vessel was presented at a ceremony Wednesday at the National Archaeological Museum in Athens.