Harry and Meghan champion girls’ education in Morocco

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Prince Harry and Meghan are seen during a henna ceremony as they visit a boarding house for girls run by the Moroccan NGO ‘Education for All’ in Asni, Morocco, on Sunday. (Reuters)
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Prince Harry and Meghan pose with staff and girls at a boarding house for girls run by the Moroccan NGO ‘Education for All’ in Asni, Morocco, on Sunday. (Reuters)
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Britain's Prince Harry and Meghan, Duchess of Sussex, are welcomed by British Ambassador to Morocco Thomas Reilly and his wife Alix, at the Casablanca Airport in Casablanca, Morocco, February 23, 2019. (REUTERS)
Updated 24 February 2019

Harry and Meghan champion girls’ education in Morocco

  • Their visit to the north African country will focus on work to promote girls’ education, women’s empowerment and the inclusion of people with disabilities

ASNI, Morocco: Britain’s Prince Harry and his pregnant wife Meghan, the Duchess of Sussex, visited a school high up in Morocco’s rugged Atlas Mountains on Sunday.

Harry and Meghan landed in the mountain town of Asni on Sunday morning on a whirlwind official visit to Morocco. They arrived by helicopter from the capital of Rabat and were welcomed by pupils from a school run by a Moroccan foundation that emphasizes education for all.

The school provides education for girls from rural communities whose parents would not typically be able to afford secondary education.

The royal couple, Harry in a light grey suit and Meghan in a red dress, were welcomed with a tray of dates, a traditional ritual of hospitality in Morocco, after they landed in Casablanca on Saturday evening.

The visit at the request of the British government is the second to the country in recent years by a member of the royal family, following a trip by Prince Charles in 2011. Queen Elizabeth visited Morocco in 1980.

As the couple arrived at the boarding house run by Education for All, an NGO that builds dormitories near schools to reduce school drop-out rates among girls aged 12 to 18, girls from the boarding house waved the flags of Morocco and Britain.

“Their Royal Highnesses will see work being done to promote girl’s education, empower young people and support children from disadvantaged backgrounds,” Kensington Palace said.

While in Asni, Harry and Meghan were also set to meet local high school students and teachers and afterwards attend a football game.

On Monday, the Duke and Duchess will attend an equestrian event in the capital Rabat involving horse therapy for children with special needs, followed by a cooking event and a meeting with young social entrepreneurs.

The couple is also expected to meet a member of the Moroccan royal family later in the day at a palace in Rabat. 

The brief trip is expected to be Meghan's last international trip before she gives birth to the couple's first child in April.


Keepers, animals keep each other company at Cairo’s shuttered zoo

Updated 03 April 2020

Keepers, animals keep each other company at Cairo’s shuttered zoo

  • The zoo in Giza, across the Nile from central Cairo, is one of the few green spaces in the usually bustling city of 23 million and is often crammed with families
  • Egypt, like other countries, is trying to curb the spread of coronavirus cases by restricting people’s movements

CAIRO: The chimpanzees, lions and hippos of Cairo’s zoo are getting a rare spell of peace and quiet alone with their keepers as a closure caused by the coronavirus outbreak keeps the public away.
The zoo in Giza, across the Nile from central Cairo, is one of the few green spaces in the usually bustling city of 23 million and is often crammed with families seeking diversion from the grind of daily life.
Now keepers do their rounds at the zoo along deserted pathways, feeding animals apples and bananas through the railings of their cages and bringing fresh hay to their enclosures.
Veteran keeper Mohamed Aly holds hands with 12-year-old chimpanzee Jolia in a gesture of friendship, while noting that keepers are careful about cleaning hands between rounds.
“I’ve been here about 25 years,” he said. “(I’ve spent) my whole life with them, they may not speak but they feel everything, and of course all of them are looking for people to play with.”
Egypt, like other countries, is trying to curb the spread of coronavirus cases by restricting people’s movements. It has imposed a night curfew and shut schools, mosques and tourist sites including the pyramids. It has so far confirmed more than 850 cases of the virus, including more than 50 deaths.
The zoo, which has been closed along with others in Egypt since March 18, is sprayed with disinfectant twice a week.

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