Enforcement courts order divorced fathers to pay SR180m to children

Enforcement courts have ordered more than 7,000 divorced fathers to pay around SR180 million ($48 million) to their children in the past 12 months. (Shutterstock)
Updated 11 September 2018

Enforcement courts order divorced fathers to pay SR180m to children

JEDDAH: Enforcement courts have ordered more than 7,000 divorced fathers to pay around SR180 million ($48 million) to their children in the past 12 months. Courts have also warned those who delay or avoid payments that there are strict procedures to guarantee the rights of children.
A business intelligence platform showed that Makkah region was the city with the highest number of alimony applications (2,657) with the value of SR38.5 million, followed by Riyadh (1,870 applications), valued at SR43.5 million, and Eastern province (969).
The Saudi Ministry of Justice and the supreme judicial council have taken steps to support children in custody and to ensure speedy settlements for them after parents have separated.
The ministry previously said that not paying alimony to children is considered both an act of violence and against child protection law in Saudi Arabia, and those who evade alimony payments will face penalties.


Mansour bin Saad Al-Kredes, Saudi Shoura Council member

Updated 26 January 2020

Mansour bin Saad Al-Kredes, Saudi Shoura Council member

  • He has been member of the consultative body since 2009
  • Since 2000, he has been serving as vice chairman of the agricultural committee at the Chamber of Commerce and Industry in Riyadh

Mansour bin Saad Al-Kredes has been a Shoura Council member since 2009. He received his bachelor’s degree in agricultural sciences from King Saud University (KSU) in Riyadh, and obtained his master’s in architectural planning from the University of Colorado.

He also obtained a master’s in animal production from the University of Colorado, and a Ph.D. in the same field from the University of Glasgow.

Al-Kredes began his career in 1989 as an assistant professor in the College of Food and Agriculture Sciences at KSU.

 He was head of the Department of Animal Production at the college between 1992 and 1998, and has been an associate professor there from 1996 until the present.

He served as a teaching assistant at the Department of Islamic Architecture at Umm Al-Qura University between 1990 and 1999.

 Al-Kredes was chairman of the Saudi Society of Agricultural Sciences between 1999 and 2002, and a member of KSU’s master’s program in biodiversity between 2001 and 2003.

Since 2000, he has been serving as vice chairman of the agricultural committee at the Chamber of Commerce and Industry in Riyadh.

In 2003, he worked for a year as a part-time adviser and member of a team tasked with developing food strategy for the Ministry of Environment, Water and Agriculture. 

Between 2006 and 2007, Al-Kredes was part of a team studying water consumption in dairy projects in Saudi Arabia.

Since 2008, he has been head of a team studying water and food security and sustainable development in the Kingdom.