Indonesia passes tougher anti-terror law

Members of Indonesian police counter terrorism unit Special Detachment 88 escort cleric Aman Abdurrahman upon arrival for his trial at a district court in Jakarta, Indonesia, on Friday. (AP)
Updated 25 May 2018

Indonesia passes tougher anti-terror law

  • Indonesia is set to host the Asian Games in three months
  • Security forces arrested hundreds of militants during a sustained crackdown since the 2002 Bali bombing

JAKARTA: Indonesia passed a new law Friday that will give police more power to take pre-emptive action against terror suspects following the country’s deadliest suicide attacks in years.
The bill had been stalled for almost two years as Parliament wrangled over key details, including how to define terrorism. But a wave of deadly suicide bombings on churches and a police station this month — claimed by Daesh — heaped pressure on lawmakers to pass the legislation. President Joko Widodo threatened to issue an emergency regulation if Parliament failed to pass the beefed-up law. Police will now be allowed to detain terror suspects for as long as 21 days, up from the current one week, and they will also be able to charge people for joining or recruiting for a “terrorist” organization, at home or abroad.
Hundreds of Indonesians flocked to Syria and Iraq in recent years to fight alongside Daesh and many have since returned.

 


Sudan criminalizes female genital mutilation

Updated 15 min 14 sec ago

Sudan criminalizes female genital mutilation

  • Nearly nine out of 10 girls in Sudan fall victim to what is known as FGM or genital cutting
  • The justice ministry said the practice “undermines the dignity of women”

KHARTOUM: Sudan’s sovereign council, the highest authority in the country, on Friday ratified a law criminalizing female genital mutilation, the justice ministry announced.
The council, comprising military and civilian authorities, passed the law after the government in May approved amendments to the criminal law that would punish those who perform the operation with up to three years in prison and a fine.
Nearly nine out of 10 girls in Sudan fall victim to what is known as FGM or genital cutting, according to the United Nations. The justice ministry said the practice “undermines the dignity of women.”