Pakistan under pressure to rein in blasphemy law

Pakistani civil society activists protest against the blasphemy law, which they claim terrifies minorities, quashes dissent and emboldens radicals who use it to whip up extremism in the population and threaten those who oppose them. (AP)
Updated 09 March 2018

Pakistan under pressure to rein in blasphemy law

LAHORE, Pakistan: One of the most frightening things about Pakistan’s blasphemy law is that the simplest act can spiral into charges that can bring the death penalty.
In the case of Aasia Bibi, a Christian woman, it started when she brought water to fellow women workers on a farm in 2009.
Bibi had a sip from the same container and some of the Muslim women became angry that a Christian had drunk from the same water. They demanded she convert, she refused. Five days later, a mob accused her of blasphemy. She was convicted and sentenced to death.
The Supreme Court is expected to hear her appeal.
Pakistan is under new international pressure to curb Islamic extremism, and activists at home say one place to start is by changing its blasphemy law.


North Korea says it won’t give Trump a summit for free

Updated 11 min 21 sec ago

North Korea says it won’t give Trump a summit for free

  • Kim Kye Gwan says Washington must discard what North Korea sees as its “hostile” policies to keep the negotiations alive

SEOUL: North Korea has responded to a tweet by US President Donald Trump that hinted at another summit with North Korean leader Kim Jong Un, saying it has no interest in giving Trump further meetings to brag about unless it gets something substantial in return.

The statement on Monday by Foreign Ministry adviser Kim Kye Gwan is the latest call by North Korea for US concessions ahead of an end-of-year deadline set by Kim
Jong Un for the Trump administration to offer mutually acceptable terms for a deal to salvage nuclear diplomacy.

Kim Kye Gwan says Washington must discard what North Korea sees as its “hostile” policies to keep the negotiations alive.