Saudi racing legend named host of Quest Arabiya’s new turbo show

Abdulaziz Al Faisal
Updated 09 November 2016

Saudi racing legend named host of Quest Arabiya’s new turbo show

ABU DHABI: Quest Arabiya on Monday announced that one of the biggest names in motor racing, Abdulaziz Al Faisal, will host its new original production “The World of Racing”.
No stranger to the racing world, the Red Bull Athlete, winner of the 2015 Dubai 24 Hours series and Saudi race car legend, Abdulaziz Al Faisal, will provide a rare glimpse into his lifelong passion for motor racing in the short-form series.
The Saudi Arabian national will bring his unique perspective to the 12 episode production – taking viewers on a behind-the-scenes look at what goes in to the sport and what can make or break you in the world of racing.
Abdulaziz said: “For me, racing is more than just going fast, it’s a way of life.”
“There’s such a huge following of motor racing in the region, and I’m excited to share my passion for the sport with fellow fans, and hopefully inspire a new generation of thrill-seeking fans.”
The World of Racing explores everything to do with the thrilling sport — from what it’s like to be in a high-speed accident on track, to learning how to master corners at a breakneck pace.
Khalid Khouri, deputy general manager of Quest Arabiya said: “There’s no hiding Abdulaziz’s enthusiasm for the sport. His ability to explain what goes on behind the scenes, curbed with his undying passion for motor racing, makes him the perfect candidate to share his story and bring his unique perspective to the region.”
The short-form series is one of the Arabic channel’s original productions that features in its Turbo themed line-up, which will broadcast throughout November.
Quest Arabiya will also broadcast a series of the region’s best exhilarating and thrill-seeking productions; including “Speed Rush”, a 30-minute program that reignites the old racing rivalry, between Abdulaziz and UAE’s racing champion, Khaled Al Qubaisi.
Alongside “Speed Sisters” a feature length documentary that follows the bold, fearless and first all-women race car driving team from the Middle East, who tear up racing tracks all across Palestine’s West Bank, which will air for the first time on a free-to-air channel.
In addition to Turbo month, the channel will continue to air programs in the following genres Extreme Outdoor, Engineering, Nature & Wildlife, Science & Space and People & Places.
For a list of broadcast times, please head to: questarabiya.com


Wimbledon will be canceled, believes Jamie Murray

Updated 31 March 2020

Wimbledon will be canceled, believes Jamie Murray

  • Tennis is at a standstill until June 7, with the entire European clay-court season already wiped out and the only Grand Slam event played on grass is expected to be officially canceled
  • Wimbledon organizers have ruled out playing the two-week tournament behind closed doors

LONDON: Cancelling Wimbledon is the only realistic option open to organizers as they grapple with the chaos caused by the coronavirus, says two-time Grand Slam men’s doubles champion Jamie Murray.
Tennis is at a standstill until June 7, with the entire European clay-court season already wiped out and the only Grand Slam event played on grass is expected to be officially canceled on Wednesday.
Wimbledon organizers have ruled out playing the two-week tournament, slated to run from June 29 to July 12, behind closed doors.
The French Open has already been postponed, shoehorned into the schedule in late September, and it will be difficult for Wimbledon to rearrange.
Murray, a Wimbledon men’s doubles finalist in 2015 and a two-time mixed doubles champion, said postponing the tournament presented a series of hurdles, including shorter evenings.
“I think for them, it’s difficult to move the tournament back because you’re running into other tournaments that are for the moment still on the schedule,” the 34-year-old Scotsman told the BBC on Tuesday.
“And also just things like daylight to host the event. Each week that passes, you get less and less light to play the tournament.
“Obviously they play until nine and 10 o’clock each night at Wimbledon.”
Murray, whose younger brother Andy is a two-time Wimbledon singles champion, is kicking his heels in the absence of tennis.
“I’m just at home, taking the necessary precautions, and trying to stay as active as I can,” he said.
“It’s different. We’re used to being on the road all the time, used to being in different cities every week, and you kind of become institutionalized to that.”