Camel races, horse-riding competitions add color to Eid festivities in Tabuk

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Camel races, horse riding competitions add color to Eid festivities in Tabuk. (SPA)
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Camel races, horse riding competitions add color to Eid festivities in Tabuk. (SPA)
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Camel races, horse riding competitions add color to Eid festivities in Tabuk. (SPA)
Updated 16 August 2019
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Camel races, horse-riding competitions add color to Eid festivities in Tabuk

  • Eid Al-Adha celebrations in Tabuk are calm, inspired by the stability they are accustomed to through the gentle rhythm of life in the desert

Eid Al-Adha or “festival of the sacrifice” commemorates the story of the Prophet Ibrahim’s test of faith, when he was commanded by God to sacrifice his son. The legend holds that God stayed his hand, sparing the boy, and placed a ram in his place.

Muslims around the world celebrate this occasion, and the citizens of Tabuk are no different. People from the region are keen to revive this ceremony in their own way through celebrations that reflect the desert area’s authenticity and modernity.

Eid Al-Adha celebrations in Tabuk are calm, inspired by the stability they are accustomed to through the gentle rhythm of life in the desert.




Camel races, horse riding competitions add color to Eid festivities in Tabuk. (SPA)

After the prayers, the Haganah groups congratulate the citizens by performing Hajini songs. Every family heads home to slaughter sacrifices and prepare the Eid feast. Then, they go out to visit friends and relatives and exchange gifts, in a social habit inherited from their ancestors.

Abdullah Al-Atwi, who specializes in the popular heritage in the Tabuk region, said: “Celebrations in Tabuk are quite similar to the rest of the Kingdom’s regions. However, Tabuk is unique due to the Haganah bands who tour the region, chant Hajini melodies and ride camels decorated with shiny patterns to reflect their joy.”

The residents of the desert gather on the third day of Eid to hold a special ceremony in which they recite poems and revive their heritage, added Al-Atwi.

He said that the ceremony features camel racing, horse riding and camel competitions organized by the region’s youth. The festivities last until the early hours of dawn.

The Tabuk region in northwestern Saudi Arabia is a magnet for tourists drawn to its beautiful Red Sea coastal cities. 

It offers a wealth of tourist attractions that help to guarantee a rewarding visit.

 


Madinah museum showcases over 2,000 rare artifacts

Updated 23 August 2019
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Madinah museum showcases over 2,000 rare artifacts

  • The museum has issued more than 44 books and publications on Madinah’s architecture

MADINAH: Dar Al-Madinah Museum offers visitors the opportunity to view historical pieces associated with the Prophet’s life. It features artifacts that capture the history, heritage, social life and culture of Madinah.

The museum’s executive director, Hassan Taher, said that it aims to promote the noble values of the Prophet Muhammad, encourage a sense of belonging and capture the history, culture and heritage of Madinah. The exhibits start with the Prophet’s life and end with the Saudi era.

Taher said: “The museum carries out specialized research in Madinah’s architectural heritage. It contains a library of relevant books, research and magazines, all of which are accessible to researchers.”

He said that the museum has issued more than 44 books and publications on Madinah’s architecture.

Taher explained that when preparing the museum’s narrative, it was necessary to reconcile temporal and spatial contexts so they created an added moral and intellectual value for the visitor.

He added: “There are around 2,000 artifacts in the museum’s exhibition halls. These include antiquities, extremely accurate models, handicrafts, manuscripts, documents, correspondence, old publications, postage stamps, photographs and artworks.”

One of the museum’s most valuable exhibits is a large collection of rare pieces associated with important moments in the Prophet’s life and the history of Madinah. 

These include various parts of the Kaaba, rare coins used in Madinah during different eras, ancient pottery, Islamic manuscripts, jewelry and collectibles from the pre-Islamic era.

Taher said that the museum has a professional team of guides who speak several languages, including English, Turkish, Urdu and Malay.